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Domestic Abuse

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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
Three years ago, Rhonda took back her life when she left her abusive husband and moved into a safe house run by the the Domestic Violence Center of Howard County.Last night at a candlelight vigil for victims of domestic violence, Rhonda lighted a white candle to mark her three-year struggle to build a new life and the struggles of all the others who have suffered with her."I am a new creation, I have renewed my life," Rhonda told the 35 people who assembled at Amherst House in Kings Contrivance village in Columbia for a Celebration of Unity Against Domestic Violence.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The panels on the stand-up display feature the words of a dozen women who survived domestic violence, telling why they stayed and how they left. Growing out of a larger effort to tackle domestic abuse - or intimate partner violence - as an issue affecting health and safety in the workplace, Kaiser Permanente sends the display, featuring the stories of its employees, around to its medical centers. The project aims to "to open up a conversation, to let employees and members know they're not the only one who may be experiencing domestic violence," said Ann Jordan, program manager for women's health at Kaiser, which offers domestic violence prevention programs to employees, including on-site services, referrals to community services such as shelters and training to recognize signs of abuse.
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NEWS
December 17, 2012
As a Baltimorean and Ravens fan, I am disheartened by the fact that so much attention is being given to the dismissal of offensive coordinator Cam Cameron and so little attention to Terrell Suggs' alleged domestic abuse troubles ("Suggs, fiancee reach court agreement," Dec. 12). John Harbaugh has held various press conferences to explain the organization's position regarding the dismissal of Mr. Cameron and the future expectations for the team. However, he has yet to publicly condemn domestic abuse and state that the Ravens will not tolerate such behavior by their players.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 18, 2014
"I think they're going too far with Ray Rice. " So said a civil servant I know only in passing, making small talk the other day. No, it is not the majority opinion, but neither is the guy alone. Last week, USA Today quoted women fans who pointedly support Rice, the NFL star dropped by the Baltimore Ravens and indefinitely suspended by the league this month for a February incident in which he cold-cocked his then-fiancee (now wife) Janay Palmer. "I've met the guy," said one. "He's such a sweet guy. " "I'm supporting him all the way around," said another woman, herself a survivor of domestic abuse.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1995
Maryland's insurers and advocates for victims of domestic violence told state regulators yesterday that they would support a state law banning insurers from using an applicant's history as a victim of domestic abuse as a factor in setting premiums or denying coverage.The groups said they'd support the change even though most major insurers say they already eliminate such information from their underwriting files.Although a few members of the Health Insurance Association of America have said they do use the information when making coverage decisions, "I really don't think it is a severe problem," said Lynne E. Fritter, an attorney for the trade association.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
In what is being described as the state's first partnership between a private and public agency to curb domestic violence, Harford County law officials and an abuse resource center yesterday formally unveiled a domestic violence intervention team.The team, made up of two officers from the Harford County Sheriff's Office and a legal advocate from the Sexual Assault/Spouse Abuse Resource Center Inc. (SARC), provides investigative, counseling and legal assistance to victims of domestic abuse.
NEWS
April 9, 2001
The Domestic Violence Program of the Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland will establish a lending library at its Woodlawn office to provide educational and self-help resources for low-income victims of domestic violence. The library, which will be open next month, is to be funded by a $10,000 grant from the Maryland attorney general's office. The Domestic Violence Program of the Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland has been serving victims of domestic violence since 1984.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,Los Angeles Times | December 27, 2006
BANGOR, Maine -- The new customer slipped into Janie B. Good's hair salon cautiously, as if worried that someone might see her. She was only in her 30s, but fear had etched tight lines in her face. Nervous, she told Good: "Don't cut off too much. He doesn't like my hair short." It's your hair, Good started to tell the young woman whose tresses draped down over her shoulders. But as the client had leaned back for a shampoo, Good noticed bruises on her neck. Easing her fingers across her scalp, Good felt bumps that could have come only from being struck.
NEWS
December 6, 1998
The Carroll County state's attorney's domestic violence unit is appealing to businesses and residents for unused cellular phones to afford abuse victims immediate access to police help.Gary Cofflin, special investigator, said the unit has about 100 active domestic violence cases, and the need is great to protect victims from further abuse."We are asking that anyone planning to upgrade a cellular phone to consider donating the old phone to the domestic violence unit," Cofflin said.Even without being activated, a cellular phone can still be used to dial 911, which is a free service, he said.
NEWS
By Dan Harsha and Dan Harsha,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
Anne Arundel County officials began participation yesterday in a national program intended to collect unwanted wireless phones, refurbish them and donate them to victims of domestic abuse. The goal is to gather 300 wireless phones from nine collection centers around the county through April 30. The effort is being jump-started by a donation of 25 phones - complete with limited emergency service - from Nextel Communications Inc. and Motorola Inc. "Victims of domestic violence feel themselves in danger," said State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee, who joined with Sheriff George F. Johnson IV to announce participation in the Call to Protect program.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
When models strut down the outdoor catwalk at The Village of Cross Keys' annual One Great Fall fashion show on Sept. 20, the sartorial showcase will be about more than hemlines and high heels. Cross Keys, an upscale enclave of residences, boutiques and cafes in North Baltimore, will utilize the occasion to benefit the House of Ruth Maryland Inc., which provides services aimed at domestic violence victims. While the glamour and beauty of fashion may seem incompatible with the ugly and violent behavior of domestic abuse, organizers are billing the event as one that, ultimately, empowers women.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 14, 2014
Domestic violence is an issue that has been on the minds of many people in recent days, prompted by the horrifying abuse committed by Ray Rice against his now-wife. His status as a professional football player, coupled with the fact that the attack was captured on video and has been seen by millions, has helped to shine a bright light on this often-neglected yet serious societal problem. Lesser known but not less tragic was the murder of Jessica Meredith Jacobsen, mother to two young boys, by her estranged husband exactly two years ago today in front of their Baltimore County home.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 10, 2014
Janay Rice's comments in support of her husband Ray, tossed out of football by the Baltimore Ravens and the National Football League, have stoked the fires of outrage that have blazed since video surfaced Monday of him hitting her. But this time, it is directed at her. She posted a message to her followers on Instagram saying that she felt like she was living in a nightmare of loss and public humiliation, and she pledged that she and Rice would...
NEWS
September 9, 2014
Janay Rice's public message today about the Ravens' decision to cut her husband, running back Ray Rice, and the NFL's decision to ban him for life after a video was published showing him knocking her unconscious is likely to have precisely the opposite of the effect she desired, drawing more attention to what is for her, a painful family matter. In a post on her Instagram account, Ms. Rice condemned the media and the public for causing her family anguish and forcing them to relive "a moment we regret every day. " She added: "If your intentions were to hurt us, embarrass us, make us feel alone, take all happiness away, you've succeeded on so many levels.
NEWS
August 3, 2014
I have to agree with commentator Jacob Simpson's take on the Ray Rice's domestic violence case ( "Ray Rice is not a victim," July 31). As a 60-year-old survivor of a 13-year relationship where the violence escalated from verbal to physical abuse, I remember each time I was attacked my partner screamed: "Why do you do this? Why do you push my buttons? Why do you have to be such a [expletive]!" All abusers blame the victim. The attacks on me were perpetuated by alcohol abuse, and 99 percent of the time all I did was ask a question or make a statement - which in his mind meant I had it coming.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2014
The Internet - that living, breathing mob of opinion that builds on itself and creates consensus in a matter of moments - was true to form Thursday morning, and didn't leave much nuance in relation to Ravens running back Ray Rice's two-game suspension. Many believed NFL commissioner Roger Goodell came down soft on Rice, relating it to drug suspensions of other players, and also called into question the league's women's health initiatives that it pushes each October. Here's a small representation of what they're saying about Ray Rice's two-game suspension: ESPN W's Jane McManus believes it's indicative of a problem with domestic violence in the league . And now ... two games?
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
Howard County's state legislators rejected a plan yesterday that would have fined people convicted of domestic abuse up to $250, with the money going to prevention and education programs.Sen. Martin G. Madden, a Clarksville Republican who sponsored the bill, said it would have created a steady funding source for the fight against domestic violence.The fine would have been in addition to criminal punishments.But other members of the delegation noted that the state has no specific criminal charge titled "domestic abuse."
NEWS
November 29, 1996
HOME SHOULD be a haven, but in too many families home is a dangerous place. According to the American Medical Association, the annual toll of domestic violence in this country includes physical abuse to at least 2 million children, up to 4 million women and 1 1/2 million older adults. A 1993 Commonwealth Fund study found that abuse by husbands or boyfriends is the single largest cause of physical injury to women in America, more common than burglary, muggings and other physical crimes combined.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
We recently witnessed another senseless mass shooting that injured one child and took the lives of four children and two adults ("Texas shooting suspect collapses in courtroom," July 12). The shooting in the suburbs of Houston, Texas, illustrates how our federal gun laws are insufficient when it comes to domestic abusers and how easily they can still get their hands on guns. Ron Lee Haskell, the accused shooter, is a domestic abuser who previously had been arrested for assaulting his wife.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
The Maryland Senate passed one of the governor's proposals to combat domestic violence Thursday, sending to the House a bill that would make it easier for assault victims to obtain permanent court orders telling their abusers to stay away. Meeting despite the snow, senators approved the measure that would add second-degree assault to the list of crimes that can trigger a protective order. There was no debate or dissent. A similar measure is scheduled for a hearing in the House next week.
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