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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | June 13, 2012
The worldwide entity that acts as a traffic cop for Internet domain names, ICANN , today released a list of hundreds of proposed top level domain names that could supplment the current 20+ suffixes in use, such as .com, .org., .net, .org, and .xxx. ICANN billed it as likely the biggest expansion ever of the Internet domain system. It's a veritable gold rush for major companies to lock up domain names that mirror their companies or their product names, such as .Apple and .Android.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Federal agents in Baltimore seized 36 commercial websites on Monday as part of an international operation to stop fraudulent online sales this holiday season, alleging that the sites have been selling counterfeit goods — including athletic gear bearing the copyrighted logos of pro sports teams. Dubbed "Operation Cyber Monday 3," the international effort involved law enforcement agencies from across the United States and Europe, and seized a total of 101 website domains that allegedly sold counterfeit sports gear, jewelry, shoes, movies and other items copyrighted by brand-name companies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1999
All Internet traffic starts with Network Solutions Inc. (www. netsol.com), a little-known Herndon, Va. company responsible for registering and maintaining the master list of Web addresses such as "www.yahoo.com," also known as domain names.Since 1993, the company has held an exclusive contract with the U.S. government to administer domain names ending in .com, .org, .net, and .edu. The company's database holds 3.4 million such addresses. At one time each three-letter suffix actually meant something: only commercial businesses, for example, could register a .com address, only nonprofits an .org address, and computer networking firms a .net address.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Federal agents in Baltimore helped lead an operation that this week seized and shut down nearly 700 U.S.-based websites linked to the sale of counterfeit pharmaceutical drugs as part of an international effort to upend the global online drug trade. The local operation, known as Bitter Pill, was part of an international initiative led by Interpol that spanned 100 countries and confiscated 3.7 million doses of counterfeit medications worth an estimated $10.5 million, according to federal officials.
NEWS
by Carson Porter | April 4, 2011
In case you missed the recent controversy involving GoDaddy.com CEO Bob Parsons, ABC has a pretty complete article about it. To summarize, Bob Parsons posted a graphic personal video showing him shooting an elephant in Zimbabwe. The video also shows villagers butchering the animal the next day. PETA jumped on this story immediately, calling for a boycott of GoDaddy.com. Bob Parsons refused to apologize and maintained that he killed the elephant because elephants trample crops that the villagers desperately need.  If you are offended by the video and want to transfer your domain names away from GoDaddy, check  http://www.domparison.com  to compare fees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | March 8, 1999
Not everything on the Internet is what it seems -- or where it seems.A trip to www.newark.com won't deliver you to New Jersey's largest city, but to an electronics company in Chicago. If it's the Windy City you're after, don't bother with chicago.com. That will send you to the home page of an engineer in California.Now the worst part. Baltimore.com no longer points to Charm City, but to Dublin. As in "Dublin, Arlin, hon."This mixed-up geography is more than a minor roadblock for tourists looking for information on the World Wide Web. It's evidence that Baltimore and many other cities are quietly losing some of their most valuable Internet real estate: their domain names.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Carpenter and Susan Carpenter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 25, 2000
What's in a name? If you ask the owners of JimSmith.com, BrianFrank. com and many other people who have registered their fairly common birth names as dot-coms, the answer is jealousy. "Why the hell is there a Web site with my name?" one amazed visitor to Brian Frank.com wrote on the site's guest book. "I can't believe you've wasted this url.com on this content," whined another. "My name is Brian Frank and ... [I'm] trying to start up my site and I see this." "My name is also Brian Frank," a third visitor wrote, anchoring a string of messages from people who shared the same name.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2002
Memo to Mayor Martin O'Malley: Someone's taken Baltimore, Maryland, and he's holding it for $8,500 in cash. What happens if you don't pay up, Mr. Mayor? Well, whenever anyone goes to the Web site www.baltimorema ryland.com, they won't find anything approximating the city, its government or civic life in general. Unless pornography counts as civic life. That's right, Baltimore truly has joined the Information Age, though not in that "Digital Harbor" way O'Malley's been imagining. "I'm disgusted, repulsed and annoyed," O'Malley said after learning about the pornography site last week.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1997
By filling out computerized forms and paying a few hundred dollars, Massoud Chaharbakhsh built an empire of big-city newspapers.Now, the Rockville man is being pursued by lawyers for a half-dozen media companies who say he is ruining prestigious names by using variations of their trademarks on his World Wide Web sites.The owners of the Chicago Tribune and Tampa Tribune are suing Chaharbakhsh in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt in a case that Internet experts say is among the first in the country to pit newspaper trademarks against so-called computer domain names.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2000
WASHINGTON - New names appearing next year on the Internet could well end with ".union," ".web" and ".info." But don't look for ".xxx," an online porn district, or ".kids," a safe playground. Yesterday, those names were rejected by the staff of the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a nonprofit organization in charge of key areas of Internet administration. The staff recommendations will be weighed by ICANN's 19 board members when they meet next week in Marina del Rey, Calif.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | June 13, 2012
The worldwide entity that acts as a traffic cop for Internet domain names, ICANN , today released a list of hundreds of proposed top level domain names that could supplment the current 20+ suffixes in use, such as .com, .org., .net, .org, and .xxx. ICANN billed it as likely the biggest expansion ever of the Internet domain system. It's a veritable gold rush for major companies to lock up domain names that mirror their companies or their product names, such as .Apple and .Android.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Update: Mirlande Wilson told WRC-TV  in Washington Thursday that she has lost her ticket . If you've been following the bizarre story about the Baltimore woman who claims she may have won a piece of the Mega Millions record-breaking $656 million jackpot, you may have noticed the peculiar hat Mirlande Wilson wore to her news conference this week -- the one with “Sweet Swine Pork Rinds” stitched across the front. After Wilson's picture was broadcast by The Baltimore Sun and news organizations across the country, a reader from Chicago wrote in to suggest that Wilson and her cap were part of a political stunt designed to smear Mitt Romney, the GOP frontrunner for president.
NEWS
by Carson Porter | April 4, 2011
In case you missed the recent controversy involving GoDaddy.com CEO Bob Parsons, ABC has a pretty complete article about it. To summarize, Bob Parsons posted a graphic personal video showing him shooting an elephant in Zimbabwe. The video also shows villagers butchering the animal the next day. PETA jumped on this story immediately, calling for a boycott of GoDaddy.com. Bob Parsons refused to apologize and maintained that he killed the elephant because elephants trample crops that the villagers desperately need.  If you are offended by the video and want to transfer your domain names away from GoDaddy, check  http://www.domparison.com  to compare fees.
NEWS
By Carson Porter | February 22, 2011
It's officially time to buy that domain name you've been thinking about. Godaddy.com is offering $1 new domain name registrations and transfers for $1 with promo code PRESIDENT. Additional 18 cent ICANN fee applies. May be used on .COM, .US, .MOBI, .BIZ, .NET, .ORG, .CA, .CO.UK and .IN. This is the best deal I've seen GoDaddy offer and it might not pop up again for months.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
Bob Parsons managed the sort of life leap that movies are made of: Bethlehem Steel laborer to dot-com millionaire. The Baltimore native struggled as a student, graduated from Patterson High School by the skin of his teeth and fought in Vietnam before returning to Baltimore and a job at the Sparrows Point steel mill. No thanks, he quickly decided. "That place was no place to work," he said. He ended up at the University of Baltimore, majoring in accounting. After a stint running a small accounting practice, he moved to Iowa, started a software company and — in 1994 — sold it for $64 million to Intuit.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2008
Fourteen years ago, Chris Clark shelled out 20 bucks to register the domain name "pizza.com." This afternoon, he's selling it to the highest bidder for somewhere in the neighborhood of $3 million. "It's crazy, it's just crazy," he said somewhat giddily yesterday morning from his home in North Potomac. By then, a week's worth of anonymous bidding at an online auction site had pushed the price to $2.6 million. The auction closes at 2 p.m. today. "That amount of money is significant," said Clark, 43, who recently launched a software company.
NEWS
August 22, 2005
THE INTERNET has all sorts of big unresolved problems - from spam to the limited access of those living in much of the developing world. But, by and large, it's a marvel, a world-changing technology spawned by the U.S. government but then sustained by largely private and loosely coordinated efforts that have worked so well that the Internet has quickly become essential to worldwide economic activity. An international working group commissioned by the United Nations to study the Internet thinks that's not good enough, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rita Ciolli and Rita Ciolli,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2001
When you were born, your parents took care of registering your name. But you just may want to do it all over again. Sure, that birth certificate established your offline identity once and for all, but what about your digital identity? And while people can find you easily with a street address or telephone listing, how do they find you in cyberspace? This fall, some of those questions will be answered. That's when ".name" arrives, a new Internet domain name that would let online citizens create a permanent electronic identity that would be as unique as their terrestrial one. "Most people would rather have their own name than an irrelevant series of names and numbers to identify them," said David Hirschler, vice president of global marketing for http://register.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | March 4, 2008
Log onto theeconomist.com and pretty much the only thing you'll see is a giant mug shot of Alan Greenspan - which irks The Economist magazine to no end. The 165-year-old English publication, read by financial and political junkies worldwide, is stuck using plain old "economist.com" - sans the all important "the" - as its Web home, even though it has trademarked the two-word title. Three weeks ago, a United Nations intellectual property arbitrator ruled that while he's "highly sceptical and almost incredulous" over aspects of the situation, there's no legitimate reason to rip the domain name from the owner who claimed it in 1996.
NEWS
August 22, 2005
THE INTERNET has all sorts of big unresolved problems - from spam to the limited access of those living in much of the developing world. But, by and large, it's a marvel, a world-changing technology spawned by the U.S. government but then sustained by largely private and loosely coordinated efforts that have worked so well that the Internet has quickly become essential to worldwide economic activity. An international working group commissioned by the United Nations to study the Internet thinks that's not good enough, however.
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