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SPORTS
October 17, 2008
Jamison Hensley Dolphins, 13-10 If the Ravens couldn't beat Cleo Lemon last year, they won't beat Chad Pennington this time. David Steele Ravens, 24-20 Both teams will run. The Ravens will stop the run better. Edward Lee Dolphins, 16-10 Cam Cameron will learn how it feels to be on the other end of a Ravens-Dolphins meeting. Peter Schmuck Ravens, 20-9 Perfect time and place for the Ravens' first road win in a year. Ken Murray Ravens, 24-17 Another losing streak into Miami, but this time the Ravens get it right.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1990
Three new dolphins were coping well at the National Aquarium today after a five-hour plane ride from Florida last evening, said Vicki Aversa, an aquarium spokeswoman.The dolphins, all female, were resting in an isolated pool. They will remain there for a few weeks until they are ready to move into a 1.2 million-gallon display tank in the marine mammal pavilion. The pavilion is to open in late December.The dolphins -- Hailey, Schooner and Shiloh -- will share the tank with the three beluga whales and three other dolphins that arrived from Texas in August.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Seven bottlenose dolphins have washed up dead on Maryland shores in recent weeks, part of a larger mystery along the Mid-Atlantic coast, where alarmed scientists are working to find the cause of more than 120 dolphin deaths since June. The seven dolphin carcasses were found in the Chesapeake Bay and on beaches on Maryland's Atlantic coast during July. In a typical July, marine biologists might respond to a single report of a dead dolphin, said Dr. Cindy Driscoll, veterinarian and fish and wildlife health program director for the state Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | May 24, 1991
About 40 dolphins, which apparently took an unorthodox detour on their spring journey up the Atlantic coast, were spied yesterday visiting the Choptank River near Cambridge.Armed with binoculars and cameras, a group of astonished spectators counted the dolphins as they swam past about 200 yards off the Horn Point Environmental Laboratories."It was kind of impressive. They took about an hour to pass by," said Wayne Bell, vice president for external affairs for the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies, which operates the laboratories.
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger and Lynda Robinson | October 24, 1990
Three more Atlantic bottlenose dolphins were moved late last night into Baltimore's National Aquarium, joining three others that will be displayed in the new $35 million marine mammal pavilion when it opens in December.The three female dolphins -- Hailey, Schooner and Shiloh -- were purchased from Zoovet, a California-based company that supplies dolphins to aquariums, said Vicki Aversa, an aquarium spokeswoman. The dolphins had been living at the Hawk's Cay marine mammal facility in the Florida Keys.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson | June 26, 1991
Two bottlenose dolphins at the National Aquarium's Marine Mammal Pavilion may be expecting calves, aquarium officials said yesterday. Blood tests have made officials hopeful of two new arrivals early next year, the first in the aquarium's 10-year history."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 12, 1992
In the first major international accord to save dolphins, 10 nations that fish for tuna in the eastern Pacific Ocean have agreed to cut the killing of dolphins by 80 percent during the 1990s.The agreement, negotiated by the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission last month, builds on an earlier 80 percent drop in dolphin kills, achieved from 1986 to 1991."The resolution sets into motion a program to reduce dolphin mortality to insignificant levels, to levels approaching zero," Dr. James Joseph, director of the commission, said in a phone interview from La Jolla, Calif.
SPORTS
By Greg Cote and Greg Cote,Knight-Ridder | October 19, 1990
MIAMI -- They tried and tried, but they just couldn't do it. The Miami Dolphins' offense simply could not give away a football game last night at Joe Robbie Stadium.No takers.Certainly not the New England Patriots.The Dolphins gave away five turnovers -- four in a frightful first quarter -- but the Pats kept treating the gifts like ugly neckties and the Dolphins escaped with a homely 17-10 victory over their AFC East brothers before 62,630.Miami improved to 5-1, its best start since 1984, and is assured of another week's tie or better atop the division race.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | March 17, 1994
TEL AVIV -- Three dolphins stranded by a bankruptcy are the central figures in the great Flipper Flap.From limbo in an abandoned pool, they have been saved -- or condemned, depending on who's doing the telling -- to perform in an amusement park. It is yet another controversy from Israel taking on international dimensions.The dolphins were part of a contingent obtained from Russia to put on entertainment shows at Dolphinarium, a shabby 13-year-old beachfront building on Tel Aviv's Mediterranean coast.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
MIAMI -- Miami Dolphins coach Don Shula went to his heavy-metal act last week. He showed off his 1972 Super Bowl ring to his players at practice. You know the ring. The one from the season the Dolphins went unbeaten. Huge glob of gold, surrounded by diamonds."The young guys were impressed and the veterans got hungry,said Miami free safety Louis Oliver. "We played well in the first half of the year, but got complacent in the second. The ring alerted us that it was time to prepare for the big dance.
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