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NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 16, 1993
A new form of exchange called ''time dollars'' is flourishing where regular cash is short in this city's poor black neighborhoods.The new exchange simply formalizes traditional quid-pro-quo neighborhood help by expanding one-to-one relationships to thousands of people.But for socially chaotic neighborhoods, the time dollars are also a powerful new organizing tool linked by the latest technology -- a sophisticated computer network, with terminals in neighborhood leaders' homes, in police stations and libraries.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Hillary Rodham Clinton is scheduled to host what might be the single biggest fundraiser for Democratic Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown tonight in Potomac. The former secretary of state and potential presidential candidate is headlining Brown's 5 p.m. event at a wooded 2.8-acre estate in the wealthy Washington suburb. Tickets cost $4,000 each - even more for VIP tickets, according to an event invitation. Brown campaign manager Justin Schall said as many as 500 people might attend and the campaign expects to raise more than $1 million - a sum greater than that garnered during a May fundraiser for Brown featuring former President Bill Clinton.
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NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
After three years of growing frustration with the National Security Agency's bookkeeping, Congress has voted to take away the NSA's power to sign multimillion-dollar deals with contractors helping the agency modernize. The extraordinary measure shifts power over hundreds of millions of dollars in technology contracts from the NSA's Fort Meade headquarters to the Pentagon, where they would be subject to accounting procedures that lawmakers say are lacking at the global eavesdropping agency.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 4, 2014
A Family Dollar store is slated to open this fall as an anchor tenant in Cold Spring Shopping Center in Baltimore, the chain announced. Family Dollar Stores Inc. signed a lease for nearly 9,000 square feet in the center at Cold Spring Lane and Loch Raven Boulevard, owned by Schwaber Holdings. The Matthews, N.C.-based chain is being acquired by Dollar Tree Inc. in an $8.5 billion merger announced last week that would create North America's biggest dollar store chain. Family Dollar sells mostly lower-margin consumables such as food and household products priced between $1 to $5 and targets urban shoppers in lower-income neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Joy Aschenbach and Joy Aschenbach,National Geographic News Service | March 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Most U.S. dollars don't stay home.Since at least the mid-1980s, more than half of the money in circulation has been traveling overseas."We estimate that roughly 60 percent is now out of the country. But there's no way to track it," says Joseph R. Coyne of the Federal Reserve System, the central bank of the U.S. government.As of mid-February, a total of $296.5 billion in paper currency was in circulation. Demand determines the amount.The U.S. money factory -- the Treasury Department's Bureau of Engraving and Printing -- operates 24 hours a day and makes more paper currency than any other facility in the world.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | February 16, 1992
Shopping and dining in Jamaica are less expensive for Americans as a result of a decision by the Jamaican government last fall to abolish the fixed rate of exchange for the Jamaican dollar. The currency is now traded publicly and subject to market fluctuatuions. One U.S. dollar worth seven Jamaican dollars under the old system, has recently been worth 20 Jamaican. Tourists in Jamaica can pay for any goods in American dollars.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | April 28, 2004
DID YOU think Microsoft spawned fear, envy, loathing, fascination and paranoia? Get ready to go Google-gaga. The secretive and mighty Google Inc. is expected to announce its initial public stock sale tomorrow, inaugurating new levels of wealth and ambition for the California-based search engine company. Stock market joy will be the initial response. But Google is so pervasive and essential that its public-ownership debut can also be guaranteed to amplify questions about its financial, political and social influence.
TRAVEL
By Jason La and Jason La,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2007
Longing for an out-of-country excursion but feeling a little poor because you have only dollars in your pocket? Even with the fast-eroding value of the dollar against other currencies, you still can find international destinations where your buck goes a long way. And you won't have to forgo choice sightseeing or comfort. All you need is a little latitude - and longitude - in selecting your next vacation spot. Last year, I wanted to take one long trip before I had to ease into professional life.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
MOSCOW -- There's a new dirty word in Russia: dollar. In a move intended to boost confidence in the Russian ruble, the head of a Kremlin advisory group has proposed barring references to American greenbacks - and euros - in the course of official business as well as imposing fines on bureaucrats who publicly express prices in foreign currency. Yevgeny Velikhov, secretary of the Public Chamber, sent a letter to parliament last week proposing legislation that he says will help break the stereotype that the ruble is unstable and encourage Russians - and the rest of the world - to give it respect.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | April 20, 2001
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- If President Bush wants to make an immediate political and economic impact on the Western Hemisphere, he can encourage an existing trend toward dollarization of Latin American economies. Most Latin American currencies are tied to the dollar. Some nations use traditional fixed exchange rates in which the central bank promises to redeem domestic currency for dollars at a set price. Argentina's 10-year-old currency board is stricter. It must hold a dollar in assets for every peso liability it creates.
NEWS
By Michelle Minton | July 30, 2014
This month, Maryland banned high-proof liquors like Everclear and other inexpensive tipples . Self-proclaimed public health activists claimed such "high octane" liquors increased the likelihood of binge-drinking and sexual assaults on college campuses. While the merits of the ban are debatable, one aspect of it is not: the use of taxpayer money to support a political agenda.   The "grain alcohol ban" was backed by the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, a coalition of researchers and administrators at 10 Maryland colleges and universities.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
An $8.5 billion merger creating North America's biggest dollar store chain could mean increased competition for mass discounters such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. but less choice for shoppers. In the Baltimore area and elsewhere, retail experts said, Dollar Tree Inc.'s planned purchase of Family Dollar Stores Inc., announced Monday, likely will lead to some store closings, though the companies have not identified any locations. Dollar Tree, which runs mostly suburban stores and sells a mix of consumables as well as items such as gifts, party goods and greeting cards for $1 or less, has about 55 stores in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Darrell Gaskin | July 27, 2014
The Potomac River has long been a symbolic divide between two states with divergent histories and politics. Today, the difference between Virginia and Maryland plays out in Medicaid coverage. In Maryland, low-income workers - adults living alone making $15,552 a year or less, or a family of four earning less than $31,720 - are eligible for Medicaid. In Virginia, workers with these incomes or lower are most likely uninsured. That's because the Virginia legislature last month rejected Gov. Terry McAuliffe's appeal to expand Medicaid to cover this group.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
If your roof starts leaking live a sieve, it's not only prudent to get a new roof but to install a short-term fix - buckets to catch the water, perhaps, or a tarp - before your house is ruined. So should it be with so-called tax inversions by U.S. corporations. The long-term answer may be tax reform, but right now the leaks have to be plugged. What is a tax inversion? It's when a big U.S.-based multinational buys a company off-shore and then ships its own corporate headquarters there to avoid paying U.S. federal and state corporate taxes.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
After 30 years in Washington it's time for Sen. Barbara Mikulski to go ( "Obama requests $3.7 billion to address influx of immigrant children," July 8). It appears she has forgotten whose money she is spending. Last week she appeared on local TV bragging about the federal dollars she got to upgrade several fire stations and saying how Maryland taxpayers won't have to pay for these upgrades. Has she forgotten that Marylanders pay federal taxes? J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 10, 2014
Excessive drinking accounts for 10 percent of deaths among working-age adults, making it the leading cause of preventable death of Americans, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The alcohol use killed about 88,000 people aged 20 to 64 a year from 2006 to 2010, shortening their lives by about 30 years. They died from health effects including breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease, as well as from violence, alcohol poisoning and car crashes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2005
Thomas W. Cole III, the former host of the popular WBAL-TV show Duckpins for Dollars who later sold real estate, died of cancer Thursday at Brightwood Center in Lutherville. The Towson resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised in Windsor Hills, he was a 1947 Loyola High School graduate and earned a business degree from Loyola College. He served in the Army in Korea before attending the University of Baltimore Law School. In the 1950s, Mr. Cole went into management training for Sealtest Dairies on Loch Raven Road.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
Allfirst Financial Inc. will begin dispensing more than $1 million in golden dollars beginning Monday. The Baltimore-based banking company is the first financial institution in the country to team up with the United States Mint to promote and distribute the coin on a large scale. Allfirst's 261 branches in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington each have 4,000 golden dollars to distribute. Tellers will dispense the dollars as change to customers from their cash drawers. "This $1 million is just the start," said Philip Hosmer, an Allfirst spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
When the derailed train cars full of hazardous chemicals exploded, a shock wave shot through an adjacent industrial park, shattering windows, cracking concrete and buckling metal paneling and roofs. A year later, the recovery continues. "We're a long way from being back to normal, that's for sure," said Mike Brown, president of Baltimore Windustrial Co., which had one of its warehouses destroyed and another badly damaged. The derailment and blast occurred May 28 after a southbound CSX Transportation train collided with a trash truck at a crossing near Pulaski Highway in Rosedale.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
I spilled my coffee and laughed out loud when I read this sentence in David Selig's Preakness commentary ( "Coffee Companion (5/19): Chrome's nose, throwback uniforms and more ," May 19). He wrote: "The casinos that have opened under the administration of Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Brown have aided the horse racing industry by boosting the size of purses. " Some of us remember the five years between 2002 and 2007 when Mr. O'Malley and the dim bulbs in Annapolis fought allowing any casinos to operate in Maryland and said that using gambling money to help the state was "morally bankrupt" because casinos would bring "undesirable people, prostitution and crime.
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