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Dollar Coin

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NEWS
March 9, 2011
The Sun's recent article on the dollar coin ("Dollar for dollar, a big savings," March 8), documents a prime example of where our government has taken a wrong turn. As pointed out in the article, the savings accrued from eliminating the paper dollar bill and replacing it with a more durable dollar coin is significant. Budget-conscious representatives of the people should consider this a "no-brainer. " What could be stopping them? Lobbyists from the paper and ink providers have consistently influenced representatives to drop the subject.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Fiscal cliff is so last year. In 2013, it's all about the trillion-dollar coin. And there's at least one news outlet campaigning for the dream coin to feature Michael Phelps. If you haven't been paying attention, the idea of a trillion dollar coin -- apparently like a silver dollar but A LOT heavier -- is gaining some degree of traction in Washington as lawmakers kick around ways to fix the ginormous national debt. A legal loophole would allow the U.S. Treasury to make huge-value coins.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Fiscal cliff is so last year. In 2013, it's all about the trillion-dollar coin. And there's at least one news outlet campaigning for the dream coin to feature Michael Phelps. If you haven't been paying attention, the idea of a trillion dollar coin -- apparently like a silver dollar but A LOT heavier -- is gaining some degree of traction in Washington as lawmakers kick around ways to fix the ginormous national debt. A legal loophole would allow the U.S. Treasury to make huge-value coins.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
I have been in favor of the dollar coin for years now, but its value cannot be measured by the popularity of the coin now ("Nobody wants dollar coins," May 1). I think I have one, it's in my golf bag as a ball marker. The value of the dollar coin lies in the elimination of the dollar bill. The dollar bill is a has very little going for it other than you can fold it and put it in your wallet. It's expensive to make and only last a short time. Sure, there is much that can be done to make the dollar coin recognizable, put a hole in it like some European currency, for example.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 25, 1999
DALTON, Mass. -- Between now and March 1, when a new $1 coin goes into circulation, the U.S. Mint will be hard at work trying to convince Americans that they need it. Television advertisements, Cheerios boxes -- even a float in today's Macy's parade -- will sing the praises of the gold-colored Sacagawea dollar.But they should not waste their effort in Dalton."Frankly, I don't want it in my register," said Ruth Trapnell, 60, at the gift shop where she deals in scented candles, novelty beer steins and T-shirts that say "The Buck Starts Here."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Concerned about the cost of printing $1 bills, some budget-cutters in the nation's capital are advocating change: replacing the dollar bill with a gold-colored dollar coin.The switch might be unpopular, but a durable dollar coin could save the country up to $400 million a year.More than 100 members of the House are expected to co-sponsor a bill for the dollar coin.Threatening to stop the buck is a coin a little bigger than a quarter. Under the House plan, George Washington's visage would give way to a design honoring veterans.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
I have been in favor of the dollar coin for years now, but its value cannot be measured by the popularity of the coin now ("Nobody wants dollar coins," May 1). I think I have one, it's in my golf bag as a ball marker. The value of the dollar coin lies in the elimination of the dollar bill. The dollar bill is a has very little going for it other than you can fold it and put it in your wallet. It's expensive to make and only last a short time. Sure, there is much that can be done to make the dollar coin recognizable, put a hole in it like some European currency, for example.
NEWS
February 27, 1995
Ever find yourself with a handful of dimes and nickels when the parking meter takes only quarters?Why be so single-minded?It has everything to do with money -- charging a top rate to park in the prime downtown business district -- and keeping the meters in tiptop shape.Here's how city officials explain it: Of the 12,000 parking meters in Baltimore, about 10 percent take only quarters. And most of them are located in the central business district. Because parking is at a premium downtown, the cost to park per minute is greater there.
NEWS
July 4, 1991
If a dollar coin replaced the dollar bill, it would make today's Fourth of July celebrations more enjoyable for thousands of local residents. Riding the Metro today could be as easy as dropping a dollar coin into a fare basket instead of waiting in lines only to have a fare card machine reject a slightly creased paper bill. Along with American independence, one could celebrate the $318 million this coin would save the federal government annually. Yet the general public fears the inconvenience of those extra coins weighing down their pockets, making Congress skittish about endorsing the "U.S.
NEWS
February 12, 2007
NATIONAL Harvard picks female president Drew Gilpin Faust, 59, yesterday became the first woman appointed president of Harvard since the university's founding in 1636. pg 3A Americans split on change With a dollar coin paying tribute to American presidents set to go into general circulation Thursday, a poll found that three-fourths of people surveyed oppose replacing the dollar bill with a dollar coin. People are split evenly on the idea of having both a dollar bill and a dollar coin.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
Here's a challenge for The Sun writers: At your next staff meeting, have everybody dig into their pockets (or pocketbooks) and count the number of Susan B. Anthony $1 coins you have collectively. My guess is zero ("Sensible change: Switch to $1 coins," April 25). This raises the question, how does op-ed writer Dave DuGoff get almost 700 words on the commentary page to promote an idea that coincidentally would be quite convenient for his car-wash business? Readers should know that the U.S. Mint has hundreds of thousands of Susan B. Anthony $1 coins on its hands, but it can't get banks to order them due to lack of demand.
NEWS
By Dave DuGoff | April 25, 2012
Americans embrace innovation. It is in our DNA. We are always on the lookout for new ways to do something faster, cheaper, better. From the horse and buggy to the automobile; from the rotary telephone to the iPhone, we're always willing to embrace innovation if it will make our lives more efficient and productive. Unfortunately, the federal government's bureaucratic inertia has stood in the way of one such innovation that would save the country billions of dollars while making things easier for millions of small business owners like myself.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
The simplest way to encourage use of the dollar coins is to retire the paper bills ("Spare change," Sept. 7). My family has vacationed in Canada for 40 years, and during that time that country introduced the dollar coin (called a "Loonie" because of the imprint of a loon on its reverse side) and at the same time retired the bills. People soon stopped complaining, and soon the "Toonie" came along, and all two-dollar paper bills were retired. We kept a little change purse for just these coins and found the whole situation no inconvenience at all. I say if the move will really save the U.S. a lot of money, it is something that should be done.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
After reading the story about the Federal Reserve banks' vaults overflowing with useless dollar coins minted because of a congressional mandate ("Dollar coins piling up at Baltimore reserve bank," Sept. 6) I cannot believe we are going to turn over control of our health care system to these idiot Washington bureaucrats. Mike Jacober, Relay
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
In a dimly lit underground vault a block from Camden Yards, the Federal Reserve is holding millions of dollars in cash that nobody wants. The money - stored in cloth and plastic sacks piled high on metal shelving units - is in the unloved form of dollar coins, some of them never used. But a 2005 law requires the reserve bank to keep ordering coins regardless of its stockpile, and so vaults in Baltimore and around the country are filling up. "This is just a small portion of what there is nationwide," Dave Beck, senior vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond and regional executive for the Baltimore branch, said as he stood inside a small warehouse filled with money bags, each containing 2,000 coins.
NEWS
March 9, 2011
The Sun's recent article on the dollar coin ("Dollar for dollar, a big savings," March 8), documents a prime example of where our government has taken a wrong turn. As pointed out in the article, the savings accrued from eliminating the paper dollar bill and replacing it with a more durable dollar coin is significant. Budget-conscious representatives of the people should consider this a "no-brainer. " What could be stopping them? Lobbyists from the paper and ink providers have consistently influenced representatives to drop the subject.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 25, 1992
DETROIT -- With the fervor of newly minted evangelists, vending-machine company executives have taken up the cause of Susan B. Anthony. Not the famous suffragette, the infamous dollar coin.One of them is Robert Nowak, finance and administration vice president at Warren, Mich.-based Variety Food Services, which serves more than 250,000 southeastern Michigan workers daily through its cafeterias and vending machines.Variety puts its coins where its mouth is, circulating more than a million Anthony dollars a year to get around fickle paper-bill changers, cut down on unnecessary change and build grass-roots support for the dollar coin.
NEWS
By Patricia A. McGuire | August 17, 1998
A WEEK ago on this page, writer Kristine Holmgren harshly denounced the selection of Sacajawea, the American Indian JTC Shoshoni woman, who accompanied Meriwether Lewis and William Clark on their 1805 expedition, to represent the ideal of liberty on the new dollar coin.Ms. Holmgren pointed out that Sacajawea was a slave who had no choice in making the trip. The writer raised many questions about the selection process, including asking several times "Who are these people?" referring to the members of the Dollar Coin Design Advisory Committee that chose Sacajawea's likeness for the coin.
NEWS
February 12, 2007
NATIONAL Harvard picks female president Drew Gilpin Faust, 59, yesterday became the first woman appointed president of Harvard since the university's founding in 1636. pg 3A Americans split on change With a dollar coin paying tribute to American presidents set to go into general circulation Thursday, a poll found that three-fourths of people surveyed oppose replacing the dollar bill with a dollar coin. People are split evenly on the idea of having both a dollar bill and a dollar coin.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 25, 1999
DALTON, Mass. -- Between now and March 1, when a new $1 coin goes into circulation, the U.S. Mint will be hard at work trying to convince Americans that they need it. Television advertisements, Cheerios boxes -- even a float in today's Macy's parade -- will sing the praises of the gold-colored Sacagawea dollar.But they should not waste their effort in Dalton."Frankly, I don't want it in my register," said Ruth Trapnell, 60, at the gift shop where she deals in scented candles, novelty beer steins and T-shirts that say "The Buck Starts Here."
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