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By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | September 9, 1996
WASHINGTON -- It is hardly surprising that the Bob Dole campaign would throw a couple of media consultants over the side. When things are going as badly as they are for Mr. Dole, somebody has to take the rap. And it can't be the candidate.But the staff shakeup at this particular time contributes to a picture of the Republican campaign in disarray and panic. That, in turn, can hasten the process of disintegration.There are several precedents for the situation in which Senator Dole finds himself, none of them encouraging.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Bob Dole tapped his forehead with his left index finger to identify the mastermind of his 96-hour "campaignathon" -- and of all the other imaginative tactics that marked his race for the White House.But, as Dole acknowledged aboard his campaign plane in the wee hours Saturday, those tactics earned him only slight and fleeting gains in opinion polls. They were no substitute for a well-crafted strategy that insiders say should have been unfolding by April, when the campaign instead went silent for weeks.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In 1970, a 38-year-old White House aide told President Richard M. Nixon that Sen. Bob Dole's "knee-jerk" defense of the Nixon administration was eroding Dole's credibility as the chairman of the Republican National Committee.That aide, Donald Rumsfeld, is Dole's national campaign coordinator today. Rumsfeld was "simply looking out for a friend 26 years ago," Christina Martin, the Dole campaign's deputy press secretary, said yesterday.In a memorandum declassified yesterday after a quarter-century under seal, Nixon wrote that "Rumsfeld has the feeling that Bob Dole may be losing some of his effectiveness because he is a 'knee-jerk' defender of the administration."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- In Omaha, Bob Dole performed an imitation of Bill Clinton trying to smoke marijuana. Later, in Sioux Falls, he was making faces and trotting out phrases like "hokey-hokey."By the time the 73-year-old Republican nominee landed in Las Vegas, the 10th appearance in 10 states since he had last had a chance to shower and shave, Dole was clearly worn and sleep-deprived. (Although one might say he looked better than Wayne Newton, the cosmetically altered Vegas showman who stood near his side.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1995
AMES, Iowa -- Sen. Bob Dole of neighboring Kansas has a political headache today and Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas is on cloud nine as a result of their surprise tie in Saturday night's Iowa straw poll among 10 Republican presidential candidates.For Mr. Dole, who has been calling himself "president of Iowa" ever since his victory over televangelist Pat Robertson and then-Vice President George Bush in Iowa's 1988 precinct caucuses, the tie was a wake-up call. He had been heavily favored to win the straw poll and has run far ahead in all the regular polls.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- In Omaha, Bob Dole performed an imitation of Bill Clinton trying to smoke marijuana. Later, in Sioux Falls, he was making faces and trotting out phrases like "hokey-hokey."By the time the 73-year-old Republican nominee landed in Las Vegas, the 10th appearance in 10 states since he had last had a chance to shower and shave, Dole was clearly worn and sleep-deprived. (Although one might say he looked better than Wayne Newton, the cosmetically altered Vegas showman who stood near his side.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 9, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- After days of bitter intramural squabbling over the Republican platform, GOP Chairman Haley Barbour yesterday sought to focus his fractured party on the formidable battle ahead to defeat President Clinton.In a speech intended to set the tone for the party's national convention four days away, Barbour said he expected that the presidential campaign would be waged over issues important to Americans, such as lower taxes, crime and education.With his party's presumptive nominee, Bob Dole, trailing badly in the polls, Barbour peppered his remarks with caustic asides portraying Clinton as an opportunist who will say anything to win re-election.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Stephen Merrill, the popular Republican governor of New Hampshire, whose backing has been eagerly (( sought by most candidates for his party's presidential nomination, will endorse Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas this week, people close to the governor said yesterday.A top Republican official who spoke on condition of anonymity said Mr. Merrill would put his considerable political reputation and well-run statewide organization behind Mr. Dole at a news conference tomorrow in Manchester, N.H.While the endorsement of the Republican front-runner would be a big blow to Mr. Dole's rivals, several strategists say the real motivation for the early statement of support may be to dissuade Colin Powell from entering the race.
NEWS
September 29, 1996
IS IT TIME to begin feeling sorry for Bob Dole? No matter what the Republican nominee does, he can't seem to narrow President Clinton's lead in the polls or connect with voters on the key issues he has fashioned: a 15 percent cut in income tax rates, an assault on a frightening rise in teen-age drug use and, lately, the charge that Mr. Clinton is a "closet liberal" pretending to be a conservative.Mr. Dole's successes are mainly in negatives. He goaded the Democratic president into denying he was a liberal -- an assertion that must have party icons twirling in the graveyard.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- With two months to go in the presidential race, Bob Dole is still searching for a way to connect with voters.Yesterday, Dole installed his third advertising team of the election season, and last night he introduced himself to the nation for at least the fourth time this year in an unusually long (5-minute) new ad. Both steps suggested that Dole fears the public still doesn't know enough about him, particularly the story of his humble small-town origins and his struggle to overcome his war injuries.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 3, 1996
OMAHA, Neb. -- Truck stops. bowling alleys, all-night diners. Rally after rally after rally. The landscape of America seen from buses and airport tarmacs starts to look all the same.But one-third of the way through Bob Dole's 96-hour, 19-state sprint to Election Day, there was little sign that "Marathon Man" would falter.Dole, a 73-year-old man who normally strives for at least seven hours of sleep a night, seems strained but also energized by this last-minute bid to change the widely anticipated outcome of his challenge to President Clinton.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1996
Wrapping up their fall convention, Maryland Republican officials came up with four words of advice yesterday for their presidential nominee, Bob Dole: "Take the gloves off."With 10 days to go before the election and Dole behind in the polls by double digits, many GOP activists urged their champion to zero in on Clinton's character and allegations of wrongdoing in the White House."Go negative. Hit the character issue. Don't be so afraid of offending these pantywaists," said Al Bullock, a member of the Montgomery County Central Committee, when asked what he would tell Dole.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | October 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Spurning Bob Dole's request that he drop out of the presidential race and endorse the Republican nominee, Ross Perot proclaimed yesterday that he was "here to stay," leaving Dole frustrated in the final days of the campaign.Perot called the overture made to him by Dole's campaign manager, Scott Reed, "weird and totally inconsequential." He declined to give details about the meeting, which occurred Wednesday in Dallas.But at an appearance at the National Press Club here yesterday, the Reform Party candidate said: "Am I in this for the long haul?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic National Committee said last night that it had suspended the fund-raising activities of a senior party official with long-standing ties to a prominent Indonesian family and asked the Federal Election Commission to begin an expedited investigation to determine whether he had solicited any improper donations.The decision to relieve John Huang, a vice chairman of the Democratic National Committee's finance arm, of his fund-raising duties amounted to an acknowledgment that reports that he had organized a fund-raiser at a Buddhist temple and had solicited an illegal contribution of $250,000 from a South Korean conglomerate were making him a political liability.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 19, 1996
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- Escalating his attack on President Clinton's ethics, Bob Dole asserted yesterday that the White House was being corrupted by foreign campaign donations and demanded that Clinton "come clean.""It's really unbelievable; every day we have a new scandal involving the foreign corruption of America," Dole charged at a rally here. "It's mind-boggling. The number and persistence of scandals suggests an abuse of power in this White House."In raising ethics issues for the fourth day this week, the Republican presidential nominee zeroed in on reports of contributions to the Democratic National Committee from Asian business interests.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In 1970, a 38-year-old White House aide told President Richard M. Nixon that Sen. Bob Dole's "knee-jerk" defense of the Nixon administration was eroding Dole's credibility as the chairman of the Republican National Committee.That aide, Donald Rumsfeld, is Dole's national campaign coordinator today. Rumsfeld was "simply looking out for a friend 26 years ago," Christina Martin, the Dole campaign's deputy press secretary, said yesterday.In a memorandum declassified yesterday after a quarter-century under seal, Nixon wrote that "Rumsfeld has the feeling that Bob Dole may be losing some of his effectiveness because he is a 'knee-jerk' defender of the administration."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 1996
MASON CITY, Iowa -- Struggling to keep his once-soaring campaign from a downward slide, GOP presidential contender Steve Forbes hit the campaign trail yesterday, armed with his wife and five daughters and bold charges that Sen. Bob Dole was behind a dirty tricks campaign to smear him.As polls showed his popularity dropping just two days before this state's caucuses, Mr. Forbes, who until lately has been congenial and mild-mannered in front of the cameras, stepped...
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | October 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Spurning Bob Dole's request that he drop out of the presidential race and endorse the Republican nominee, Ross Perot proclaimed yesterday that he was "here to stay," leaving Dole frustrated in the final days of the campaign.Perot called the overture made to him by Dole's campaign manager, Scott Reed, "weird and totally inconsequential." He declined to give details about the meeting, which occurred Wednesday in Dallas.But at an appearance at the National Press Club here yesterday, the Reform Party candidate said: "Am I in this for the long haul?
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 1996
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Flush from a debate that he clearly feels did nothing to slow his humming campaign, President Clinton chugged exuberantly through New England yesterday, praising and thanking big business, welfare moms, the weather, the voters and even Bob Dole."
NEWS
October 6, 1996
WHEN BILL CLINTON and Bob Dole meet tonight in their first presidential debate, you can be sure neither believes the election has already been decided. They know that in at least two (and maybe more) of the six such encounters since John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon started this ritual in 1960, the debates were probably decisive. Republican Dole will be looking for a breakthrough; Democrat Clinton will be trying to protect his big lead.Why then is President Clinton willing to debate at all?
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