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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
It's Baltimore Restaurant Week -- to benefit the city's neediest dogs and cats. This week a number of Baltimore restaurants have agreed to donate a portion from every check to the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter. Every night, one restaurant is offering the deal. Tonight it's Pierpoint in Fells Point. Here's how it works: Tonight, Tuesday Oct. 25: Pierpoint , 1822 Aliceanna St., will donate 10 percent of the check from guests that make a reservation under the name "BARCS.
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NEWS
By David Tayman, D.V.M and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Q: Our family loves Halloween. Any tips for keeping our dog and cat safe during the holiday commotion? A: Americans spend something like $7 billion on Halloween costumes, candy and decorations annually - including more than $300 million on pet costumes. While humans of all ages have lots of spooky fun on Halloween, it may be less fun for pets. In fact, Halloween can be downright dangerous. Here are some sensible precautions. Candy Pets can smell wrapped candy, even sealed in plastic bags.
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NEWS
By JOE MURRAY | December 3, 1991
Angelina County, Texas--The nights have turned cold and gotten dangerous. Getting up in the middle of the night, if I'm not careful, I'll stumble over a dog in the dark. I think I know how George Bush must feel with those domestic issues.My dogs are indoors for the duration, I guess. Every night is a three-dog night. That's how many there were at last count. They are Old Thunder, the old black dog; Lady, the pretty little lady dog; and Rusty, Rudolph the Reindeer dog. My wife named that last one. That's because, she said, Rusty looks like a reindeer, not just his color but the way he looks when he is lying on the floor by the fire.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
About 100 people gathered for a ceremony at the Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital in Baltimore last week, but it wasn't to honor a person. Instead, they paid tribute to a dog in a way that will help pets in the future. The story starts with Elaine Mintzes, a longtime city volunteer and philanthropist who was a patient at Levindale in 2012 after suffering injuries in a fire. She remembers having a dog when she was 7; her parents gave the dog to neighbors because she didn't have the initiative to care for it. That was 81 years ago. Since then, Mintzes had no special affinity for pets, until a white poodle leapt into her room at Levindale and sparked a friendship.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | May 13, 2006
Authorities in Harford County said they will pursue animal cruelty charges against a Whiteford woman after finding about 120 dogs and cats, at least 40 of them dead, in squalid conditions yesterday in two houses she owns. Dozens of animals were found roaming amid carcasses and feces in the two properties in the 2900 block of Whiteford Road, which officials believe were exclusively homes to the pets. Robert B. Thomas, a spokesman with the Harford sheriff's office, said there was evidence in the one-story rancher that the dogs had attempted to claw through the walls.
NEWS
By Tami Metz | August 1, 2011
Because I no longer live in Baltimore City, one might think I no longer have a dog in this fight. I do still own a home in Baltimore, though, and I work in the inner city five days a week, frequenting many economically challenged neighborhoods. In my travels, I have observed utter horror in the treatment of some of Baltimore's animals. The plight of many dogs and cats in this city is devastatingly cruel. There is no escape for them. Torture, starvation and hopelessness radiate from empty eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,Cox News Service | July 26, 1999
There's more than one way to name a cat.If you're a pet lover, the Web is littered with sites that can help -- whether your pet of choice is a Chihuahua or a king snake.Let's start with a good general purpose site called Petlinks.com, located understandably enough at www.petlinks.com.The first thing you'll notice is a rather busy page filled with text. But the absence of graphics means the page loads fast, and the text is an elaborate system of links for almost every type of pet you can imagine.
NEWS
By Kristin Sette and Kristin Sette,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2002
Squarely built and carefully clipped, Deborah Donovan's 45-pound black standard poodle has been known to turn a few heads on the sidewalk. So many that Donovan and her husband, Joe, could not help but name their pet Radar. "He's our Romeo," Deborah Donovan said. "He's a magnet for human beings." The Ellicott City couple, who did not want a typical name for their dog, chose a moniker shared only by two other registered pooches in Howard County: a mixed-breed and a sheep dog. But had they chosen to call their poodle Max, they might have been disappointed to hear that 115 other owners had the same name in mind.
NEWS
March 7, 2011
I read with interest your article about proposed legislation to permit dog owners to bring their pets to outdoor dining sections at restaurants ("More eateries may proclaim 'bone appétit,'" March 7).  The article also suggested that eventually pets might even be allowed to accompany their owners inside the eateries. I like dogs and cats. But I don't go on hiking trails, take walks around the neighborhood or go to festivals in order to experience other people's pets, leashed or unleashed.
NEWS
By Barbara A. Frush | March 19, 2013
When 45,000 dogs and cats are tragically killed yearly in Maryland, costing taxpayers over $8 million, a remedy is long overdue. That's why Sen. Joanne Benson and I sponsored House Bill 767 and Senate Bill 820 in the 2013 General Assembly. It will establish a voluntary, low-cost spay-neuter program for dogs and cats owned by low-income Marylanders - and it will do this without raising your taxes. Each year, close to 100,000 dogs and cats are surrendered to Maryland animal shelters and control facilities, including boxes of puppies and kittens, and the public must pay for their care.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
It's kitten season, which is the time of year animal shelters are flooded with young cats. It can be overwhelming for shelters, which can lack the space, funding, and the people to care for young kittens, some of which need to be bottle-fed every few hours, and many of which must be weaned, spayed/neutered, and then adopted. It's also when well-meaning animal lovers come through the doors with feral litters they've found outside. The experts at Best Friends Animal Society, which runs one of the largest no-kill shelters in the world and works to end shelter deaths of dogs and cats, say that while people have the best of intentions in rescuing stray litters of kittens, it's not always the best thing to do. Shelter managers do everything they can to save all the pets they receive, says Best Friends, but it's not always possible, and about 70 percent of cats that enter shelters never leave.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
People are passionate about pet breeds. While an increasing number of animal lovers list "rescue" as their favorite breed (and go, you!), many stick with the breed they grew up with or carefully researched before adding a furry friend to the family. Pets Best Insurance Service, LLC, recently released its list of the most popular breeds for 2013. While there aren't any big surprises on this year's list as compared to last year, Pets Best did identify several new trends: - The French bulldog, buoyed by more appearances in commercials and on television, rocketed up the list, from position 55 in 2006 to ranking 19 this year.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
Articles like "Happy animals, local meat" (Feb. 19) make me angry in their attempt to paint animals from non-factory farm conditions as happy and their treatment as humane. All animals go to the same slaughterhouses, and I can assure you they are neither. They use the word "slaughter" as if it is no big deal to the animal so the reader will feel guilt-free about buying these food-animals as if they are somehow helping them. They aren't. They are consuming the flesh of an animal that has panicked at knowing they are next on the kill line.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) says spaying or neutering pets can reduce or eliminate the risk of some cancers, along with reducing their urge to mark territory, wander off and get lost, race into the street after a potential mate and be hit by a car, or become aggressive over time. So it's no wonder shelters and veterinary professionals urge pet owners to spay and neuter their dogs and cats. Pet owners in Baltimore are clearly listening: The MD SPCA this week celebrated spay/neuter procedure #50,000 at its low-cost clinic on Falls Road.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
With the polar votex on its way, pets need extra consideration. Just as dogs and cats and bunnies can't be left out in the heat of the summer, cold and snowy days pose their own risks to beloved pets. The experts at the MD SPCA offer the following tips for pets and cold: - Pets shouldn't be left outside for extended periods of time when it's cold. If it's too cold for you, it's too cold for your pet. - Watch for cats! Outdoor cats sometimes seek shelter near warm car engines and sleep under the hoods of vehicles.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Starting Jan. 13, all Baltimore County residents will be able to get their dogs and cats spayed or neutered at the county animal shelter, even if they adopted the pet elsewhere, officials announced this week. The county also plans to reduce the adoption fee for cats to $50, down from $65. The adoption fee for dogs will remain $65. The cost includes vaccinations, sterilization, a license and a microchip. The animal shelter in Baldwin only began offering sterilization services a month ago, after the county installed a temporary trailer with an operating room.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
To keep its animals safe, the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) moved all of its dogs and cats to a temporary home at 1st Mariner Arena on Monday morning. Because the shelter lies in a flood-prone part of South Baltimore, BARCS convened a team of volunteers for the emergency evacuation. In a matter of hours, they safely moved more than 100 cats and nearly that many dogs. The animals will ride out the storm at the arena.
EXPLORE
September 8, 2011
What a wonderful thing it would be if every dog could curl up with a loyal human companion, or if every cat had a human caretaker who understood its many moods. The world would be a better place. Pets enrich the lives of many families in Harford County, providing companionship and unconditional love, not to mention the occasional nuzzle. We care about those pets not only as a matter of personal responsibility, but also as a matter of public policy. You may not be able to run for the office of dog catcher in Harford County, but we certainly have an office of Animal Control whose job it is to remove stray dogs and cats from the dangers of the street.
EXPLORE
Letter to the Editor | September 12, 2013
Editor: I recently invited elected officials in Harford County to accompany me on a tour of the Humane Society of Harford County to see the good work done there. I was met by the manager, Blaine Lang, who conducted the tour. The first thing I noticed was how friendly and caring the workers and volunteers were and how clean everything was kept. The dogs are paired off in fenced areas where they can go outside and remain protected from the elements. They are walked every day by workers and volunteers who continually show the animals love, respect and physical touch.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 10, 2013
You know those Sarah McLaughlin-narrated ads about puppy mills? The ones with the horrific pictures of dogs in unthinkable conditions? I flip the station as quickly as possible (I'm pretty sure everyone does), but her message is a good one. Unfortunately, if you've purchased a dog from a pet store, online retailer or breeder who didn't give you a tour of a clean and humane facility, there's a good chance your pup started out life that way, and that his mom and dad are still living there.
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