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NEWS
May 16, 2012
I wonder why strict liability is limited to pit bulls ("Pit bull fans schedule a rally today in Annapolis," May 15)? Blame becomes an issue only after a person is injured. If a dog is as loving and benign as most owners claim, why fear strict liability? William S. Ramsey, Columbia
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Columbia's first dog park will celebrate its grand opening Saturday, May 24, but those who plan to use it can register for year-long use now. Local residents have been asking for a dog park for years. The Columbia Association designated 2.7 acres at 5901 Rivendell Lane in the village of Harper's Choice for canine use, and all dog breeds will be welcome. May 24 is a free day; there is no charge to visit the park between 10 a.m. and noon. After that, Columbia Association residents will pay $35 and non-residents will pay $40 for an annual pass to the park in the form of a dog tag that covers up to three dogs.
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NEWS
October 14, 2011
When I first started going to Robert E. Lee Park ("Park back, with rules for dogs," Oct. 13) eight years ago, I would take a bucket to carry out the broken glass, used condoms, hypodermic needles, liquor bottles, plastic bags and cans. I carried out at least two pounds, sometimes up to 10 pounds every day. Lately I just take broken glass and cans out of the water itself. This horrible stuff wasn't brought in by dog people, who have been demonized all over Baltimore. Responsible dog owners use the park day in and day out, snow, rain and sunshine, dawn to nightfall; picnickers don't do that.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 26, 2014
If the third try's the charm, the Maryland Senate gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a bill aimed at untangling for the third time an emotional controversy over dog owners' liability if their pets bite someone. The bill would reverse a Court of Appeals opinion declaring that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous", a decision that has prompted many landlords in the state to evict the dogs - or threaten to kick out their owners - to avoid potential liability if someone is bitten on the premises.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 21, 2012
Editor: The recent Special Session convened in the Maryland General Assembly dealt with two proposed bills in which four days of debate were spent. Senate Bill II was designed as the supposed answer to the recent Maryland Court of Appeals ruling in Tracy vs. Solesky regarding pit bull dogs and Senate Bill I was the controversial expansion of a sixth casino forPrince George's County.  The Senate took what was a bad ruling in Tracy vs. Solesky and made it much worse by deciding that all dog owners would be liable for injuries to victims.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
We appreciate that 100 percent of Maryland legislators voted for a form of the dog bite legislation that would have eliminated breed discrimination, overturned the court ruling that declared pit bulls to be "inherently dangerous," and removed strict liability for landlords. We believe the majority of legislators did this because our testimony and advocacy efforts over the last year helped them understand what it takes to build a safe and humane community for people and their pets. That's what makes it absolutely unacceptable that a compromise could not be found and no bill was passed ("Pit bull compromise fails, trial lawyers win," April 1)
EXPLORE
November 30, 2011
I'm fed up. This Saturday morning while running my dogs around Lake Elkhorn I came across three people standing on the trail talking, with a black dog at their side. At least one of them could clearly see me coming. I shortened up my already short leashes (4 feet long) and proceeded to run past them. As I did, the dog lurched at us and broadsided one of my dogs, forcing me off the trail. I turned and said, "Why don't you control your dog?" To which the owner said, "Why didn't you let us know you were coming?"
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
The first time Frank Moraff entered his chocolate Labrador retriever Cali in aquatic competition at 8 months old, she stopped short at the edge of the 40-foot dock and stared as the toy he'd flung, and that she so desperately wanted, went sailing into the air without her. After considerable urging, "she finally slid off the dock and did a belly flop," he recalled, shaking his head and smiling. But in her second attempt that same day, she redeemed herself and jumped 17 feet. "I was thrilled," said the longtime Columbia resident, who is a member of Chesapeake DockDogs, a canine dock jumping club formed in 2003 that has 60 families as members.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Residents of the Fells Prospect neighborhood have long grumbled about abandoned dog feces in their sidewalk tree pits. But when a recent community association newsletter advised members to, among other things, place pine cones or clippings from thorny plants in the pits to keep dogs out, some property owners saw red and said the suggestions were both harmful to pets and illegal. John Lam, a dog owner who's lived in the neighborhood -- which is near Fells Point and Butchers Hill -- for three years, said the association's January newsletter “made a point that a tremendous amount of people aren't picking up after their pets.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Erica Carter's move from Pasadena to Baltimore was difficult, she said, not because of the lack of housing options, but because many places would not allow her pit bull Bailey. Though Carter has settled into a rental near Patterson Park, she said the search was daunting. And she fears it will only get worse with her next move after last week's Maryland Court of Appeals ruling that pit bulls are inherently dangerous animals. The court's decision could have far-reaching implications for landlords and dog owners who rent.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Residents of the Fells Prospect neighborhood have long grumbled about abandoned dog feces in their sidewalk tree pits. But when a recent community association newsletter advised members to, among other things, place pine cones or clippings from thorny plants in the pits to keep dogs out, some property owners saw red and said the suggestions were both harmful to pets and illegal. John Lam, a dog owner who's lived in the neighborhood -- which is near Fells Point and Butchers Hill -- for three years, said the association's January newsletter “made a point that a tremendous amount of people aren't picking up after their pets.
NEWS
By Tami Santelli | January 6, 2014
Lawmakers arrive back in Annapolis this week to a major piece of unfinished business: passing a dog bite liability bill to address the unintended consequences of the Maryland Court of Appeals' ruling in which pit bull-type dogs were deemed inherently dangerous. The Maryland General Assembly, which last year failed to pass compromise legislation to address the issue, will have another chance to bring certainty and protection to dog bite victims and dog owners. The court's unprecedented decision holds owners of pit bull type dogs, landlords and anyone else with the right to control the dog's presence on their property strictly liable for incidents involving the dog. This has resulted in paralyzing uncertainty for hundreds of thousands of dog owners in the state (nearly one-third of Maryland households include at least one dog)
NEWS
Staff Reports | September 16, 2013
County officials and pet advocates from the Perry Hall area will take part in a ceremony Tuesday marking the start of construction at the Perry Paw Dog Park. The park is a $205,000 project at Honeygo Regional Park in Perry Hall, and will include a .34-acre area for small dogs and a 1.06-acre area for larger breeds. The park will feature a key card entry system for members, water fountains for dogs and other amenities. The park will be operated by the Perry Paw Dog Park Committee, which will set operating rules and regulations, coordinate paid membership and oversee the operations of the park.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
Baltimore County officials and pet advocates from the Perry Hall area will take part in a ceremony Tuesday marking the start of construction at the Perry Paw Dog Park. The park is a $205,000 improvement to Honeygo Regional Park in Perry Hall, and will include a .34-acre area for small dogs and a 1.06-acre area for larger breeds. The park will feature a key card entry system for members, water fountains for dogs and other amenities. The park will be operated by the Perry Paw Dog Park Committee, which will set operating rules and regulations, coordinate paid membership and oversee the operations of the park.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 10, 2013
You know those Sarah McLaughlin-narrated ads about puppy mills? The ones with the horrific pictures of dogs in unthinkable conditions? I flip the station as quickly as possible (I'm pretty sure everyone does), but her message is a good one. Unfortunately, if you've purchased a dog from a pet store, online retailer or breeder who didn't give you a tour of a clean and humane facility, there's a good chance your pup started out life that way, and that his mom and dad are still living there.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 21, 2013
Whenever I have company over, my dog goes crazy barking and jumping at the door.  He's really friendly, but some of my family doesn't like him because he barks and jumps at them.  How can I get him to stop? This is a very common concern among dog owners. Dogs can feed off our excitement, activity and stress level, causing unwanted behavior: barking, rushing the door, jumping and mouthing guests. We should be sensitive to the fact that some people are uncomfortable, fearful or just don't like dogs in general.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | June 15, 1991
A vicious dog should be euthanized.It doesn't matter that such animals are often the result of poor breeding and ignorant or willfully cruel treatment. When a dog without provocation attacks people or other pets, it should be killed. No neutering, no muzzling, no confinement. No second chances.That said, I believe it's wrong to condemn a breed of dog because a few of its members are dangerous, and I am saddened by the news that the British have done precisely that.Earlier this month, British Prime Minister John Major declared an immediate ban on the importation of American pit bull terriers and other breeds developed for fighting.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | April 17, 2009
About 100 dog owners gathered Thursday night at Riverside Park Pavilion in Federal Hill to protest the $1,000 fines for owners who allow their animals outside without a leash. Animal control officers began issuing the costly citations this month. The amount is 10 times the previous fine for first-time offenders. City Councilman Edward L. Reisinger held an open forum where he and Councilman William H. Cole IV listened to dozens of dog owners, who called the new fines "excessive" while arguing for off-leash early-morning hours in city parks.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
I have lived in Roland Park a long time. People often call me when looking for referrals or trying to solve problems. Sometimes, there is a theme. The theme of this month has been dogs running loose. First came not a call but an experience my husband and I had walking on Roland Avenue. Two pit bulls with collars, no leashes and no owners, tore past us with jaws clenched.  More than a block away they grabbed a boy's pants leg at West Cold Spring Lane and Roland Avenue. The boy jumped on a bench and the dogs ran off. To avoid the dogs, we took the long way home. When we came around the corner near Hollywood Lane, the two pit bulls were standing in the corner of a yard.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
We appreciate that 100 percent of Maryland legislators voted for a form of the dog bite legislation that would have eliminated breed discrimination, overturned the court ruling that declared pit bulls to be "inherently dangerous," and removed strict liability for landlords. We believe the majority of legislators did this because our testimony and advocacy efforts over the last year helped them understand what it takes to build a safe and humane community for people and their pets. That's what makes it absolutely unacceptable that a compromise could not be found and no bill was passed ("Pit bull compromise fails, trial lawyers win," April 1)
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