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By Julie Chao | September 10, 2000
DATONG, CHINA - The way Zhang Weilin sees it, as the Chinese palate becomes more demanding and sophisticated, it's only a matter of time before the dog-meat industry takes off. With his 90 Saint Bernards, he's counting on being at the forefront of the revolution. "When China opens the dog-meat market and dog-breeding industry, it will gradually become like raising cows and sheep," said the middle-aged Zhang. "As people spend more and their dietary habits change, industrialization of dog breeding will not take as long as domestication of cows and sheep."
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NEWS
May 1, 2013
I disagree with the University of Maryland's Animal Science Department's decision to expand its horse-breeding program. There is a glut of unwanted horses and ponies across the country. Horse Rescue Farms are over-crowded and are turning away the no longer wanted animals for lack of space, feed, medication and shelter. Due to the economy and cost of keeping horses, owners are desperately trying to find homes for their no longer wanted horses, ponies, mules, and donkeys. Many are beloved pets or used for pleasure or racing or work or have outlived their purpose.
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NEWS
May 1, 2013
I disagree with the University of Maryland's Animal Science Department's decision to expand its horse-breeding program. There is a glut of unwanted horses and ponies across the country. Horse Rescue Farms are over-crowded and are turning away the no longer wanted animals for lack of space, feed, medication and shelter. Due to the economy and cost of keeping horses, owners are desperately trying to find homes for their no longer wanted horses, ponies, mules, and donkeys. Many are beloved pets or used for pleasure or racing or work or have outlived their purpose.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
Last week, food safety officials in United Kingdom, France and Sweden found traces of horse meat in ground beef sold across Europe. Massive recalls and lawsuits are ensuing. Can it happen here? Horse slaughter for human consumption was banned in the U.S. between 2007 and 2011. But now a New Mexico slaughterhouse is getting approved by U.S. authorities to slaughter horses for human consumption, and a Philadelphia restaurant has already announced plans to serve horse meat. I marvel at our hypocrisy of rejecting the notion of horse or dog meat on our dinner plates, while condemning cows, pigs and chickens to the same fate.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
Last week, food safety officials in United Kingdom, France and Sweden found traces of horse meat in ground beef sold across Europe. Massive recalls and lawsuits are ensuing. Can it happen here? Horse slaughter for human consumption was banned in the U.S. between 2007 and 2011. But now a New Mexico slaughterhouse is getting approved by U.S. authorities to slaughter horses for human consumption, and a Philadelphia restaurant has already announced plans to serve horse meat. I marvel at our hypocrisy of rejecting the notion of horse or dog meat on our dinner plates, while condemning cows, pigs and chickens to the same fate.
TOPIC
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan | February 13, 2000
WE WERE gathered in a friend's apartment last weekend, stuffing ourselves with roast pork, dumplings and homemade spicy tofu to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year, when the conversation took an interesting turn. My friend Tim, a Canadian of Taiwanese descent, extended his chopsticks to the head of the large, steamed ginger fish at the center of the dinner table and asked: "Does anyone mind if I eat the cheek? That's the best part." Many Asian food connoisseurs know the tiny flap of flesh beneath the eye is the most succulent part of the fish -- a choice morsel that inspires much bickering in my family over who gets to have it. And the fish cheek started a discussion on Asian delicacies around the world that are rarely found in the United States.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2002
SEOUL, South Korea - Prancing on a chair in a fashionable cafe, an 11-month-old beagle wears a red patent-leather collar and a sweater in festive colors. Nobody seems bothered when she puts her paws on the cafe table or tries to lap at her owner's cappuccino. In fact, this cafe is designed especially for dog owners - the menu even includes dog food - and many of the clients say they wouldn't consider going out on weekends to any establishment that didn't welcome their pets. "My dog comes first," says Kim Ju Young, a 29-year-old marketing manager who, with her beagle, Blue, patronizes several new cafes in Seoul that cater to dogs.
SPORTS
February 24, 1991
The twos have itWhat do LSU's 7-foot-1 sophomore center Shaquille O'Neal and Columbia's 6-5 sophomore forward Buck Jenkins have in common? They are the only two players to score more than 40 points in a Division I game this season and not have a three-pointer. Neither, in fact, attempted one.Politics in the fast laneAn effort to name part of a Texas highway for Nolan Ryan has some politicians playing hardball.Some Democratic state senators are balking on the proposal to name a stretch of Texas 288, which runs by Ryan's hometown of Alvin, the "Nolan Ryan Expressway."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 4, 1990
HERNDON, Va. -- The next time Joe Gibbs visits an amusement park, he's likely to stay away from the roller coaster.He'd like something more sedate, maybe along the lines of the merry-go-round.That's because the Washington Redskins have experienced a roller coaster of a season.In the past four games, they've had their two poorest games of the season -- against the Philadelphia Eagles and the Dallas Cowboys -- sandwiched around impressive victories over the New Orleans Saints and the Miami Dolphins.
SPORTS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | September 12, 1993
BEIJING -- The coach of the Chinese female runners who set two world records last week says their startling success comes more from dried worms than illegal, performance-enhancing drugs.The two Chinese young women and several of their teammatessparked the suspicions with a spectacular display at the World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany, last month.There, they took the top three places in the 3,000 meters, with Qu winning. They took the first two places in the 10,000 meters, with Wang winning.
TOPIC
By Julie Chao | September 10, 2000
DATONG, CHINA - The way Zhang Weilin sees it, as the Chinese palate becomes more demanding and sophisticated, it's only a matter of time before the dog-meat industry takes off. With his 90 Saint Bernards, he's counting on being at the forefront of the revolution. "When China opens the dog-meat market and dog-breeding industry, it will gradually become like raising cows and sheep," said the middle-aged Zhang. "As people spend more and their dietary habits change, industrialization of dog breeding will not take as long as domestication of cows and sheep."
TOPIC
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan | February 13, 2000
WE WERE gathered in a friend's apartment last weekend, stuffing ourselves with roast pork, dumplings and homemade spicy tofu to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year, when the conversation took an interesting turn. My friend Tim, a Canadian of Taiwanese descent, extended his chopsticks to the head of the large, steamed ginger fish at the center of the dinner table and asked: "Does anyone mind if I eat the cheek? That's the best part." Many Asian food connoisseurs know the tiny flap of flesh beneath the eye is the most succulent part of the fish -- a choice morsel that inspires much bickering in my family over who gets to have it. And the fish cheek started a discussion on Asian delicacies around the world that are rarely found in the United States.
NEWS
May 12, 2012
If never having done anything stupid or regrettable in high school were a requirement for holding public office, only angels and saints would qualify. Still, it's a bit ironic that Mitt Romney's supporters, some of whom recently were only too happy to criticize President Barack Obama for tasting dog meat as a child in Indonesia, rose up in indignation this week over a published report of an incident from their candidate's past that painted a less-than-stellar picture of the presumptive GOP nominee.
FEATURES
By Susan Farlow and Susan Farlow,Contributing Writer | September 20, 1992
I raced up on deck and -- bam! -- I ran smack into a Vietnamese policeman.He had just boarded our ship, the M. S. Caledonian Star, which moments earlier had docked at our first port of call, Nha Trang. But more than that, our ship was making the first-ever cruise of Vietnam, the newest frontier for American travelers.He smiled. I got up the nerve to ask, "Can I take your picture?" He nodded. I clicked."Thank you a lot," he said.A few minutes later, as my husband and I were disembarking, another young Vietnamese policeman beamed, "Have a good time."
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