Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDog And Cat
IN THE NEWS

Dog And Cat

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kristin Sette and Kristin Sette,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2002
Squarely built and carefully clipped, Deborah Donovan's 45-pound black standard poodle has been known to turn a few heads on the sidewalk. So many that Donovan and her husband, Joe, could not help but name their pet Radar. "He's our Romeo," Deborah Donovan said. "He's a magnet for human beings." The Ellicott City couple, who did not want a typical name for their dog, chose a moniker shared only by two other registered pooches in Howard County: a mixed-breed and a sheep dog. But had they chosen to call their poodle Max, they might have been disappointed to hear that 115 other owners had the same name in mind.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
About 100 people gathered for a ceremony at the Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital in Baltimore last week, but it wasn't to honor a person. Instead, they paid tribute to a dog in a way that will help pets in the future. The story starts with Elaine Mintzes, a longtime city volunteer and philanthropist who was a patient at Levindale in 2012 after suffering injuries in a fire. She remembers having a dog when she was 7; her parents gave the dog to neighbors because she didn't have the initiative to care for it. That was 81 years ago. Since then, Mintzes had no special affinity for pets, until a white poodle leapt into her room at Levindale and sparked a friendship.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kristin Sette and Kristin Sette,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2002
Squarely built and carefully clipped, Deborah Donovan's 45-pound black standard poodle has been known to turn a few heads on the sidewalk. So many that Donovan and her husband, Joe, couldn't help but name their pet Radar. "He's our Romeo." Donovan said. "He's a magnet for human beings." The Ellicott City couple, who "didn't want a typical name" for their dog, chose one shared by only two other registered pooches in Howard County: a mixed-breed and a sheep dog. But had they chosen to call their poodle Max, they might have been disappointed to hear that 115 other owners had the same name in mind.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
People are passionate about pet breeds. While an increasing number of animal lovers list "rescue" as their favorite breed (and go, you!), many stick with the breed they grew up with or carefully researched before adding a furry friend to the family. Pets Best Insurance Service, LLC, recently released its list of the most popular breeds for 2013. While there aren't any big surprises on this year's list as compared to last year, Pets Best did identify several new trends: - The French bulldog, buoyed by more appearances in commercials and on television, rocketed up the list, from position 55 in 2006 to ranking 19 this year.
NEWS
December 14, 2008
Columbia Art Center sponsoring 'Doghouse' Columbia Art Center, 6100 Foreland Garth, Long Reach Village Center, will continue to sponsor its Doghouse of Joy through Tuesday, in conjunction with Columbia Association's 2008 "Season of Giving." Items that can be dropped off include: laundry detergent and bleach, paper towels, tall kitchen drawstring bags, disinfectant floor cleaner, antibacterial dishwashing liquid, canned dog and cat food, cat litter, bathroom rugs, cloth towels and meat-flavored baby food.
NEWS
March 16, 2007
Students at Hannah More School are holding a benefit drive to help the Humane Society of Baltimore County. Students are asking for meat formulas of baby food, blankets, towels, small rugs, canned dog and cat food, large rawhide bones, cat litter, animal toys, cleaning supplies and medical gloves. The Humane Society would also welcome food scales measuring up to 4 pounds. Donations will benefit dogs, cats and other pets housed at the Humane Society of Baltimore County and other local nonprofit animal shelters.
NEWS
January 2, 2000
Two firefighters were injured last night while a battling a three-alarm blaze that broke out in the 2300 block of Tucker Lane in the Wakefield neighborhood of Northwest Baltimore. Firefighters Richard Bocian and Edward Flemming were on the first floor of the three-story house when the floor collapsed, but the men caught themselves before plunging into the basement. Both were transported to Mercy Medical Center, where they were treated and released. It took about 50 firefighters two hours to bring the fire, which began about 7 p.m., under control.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera | March 10, 1991
When the times are tough, things can get a little weird.Consider: Some County Council members have been publicly griping that the county executive should restore $500,000 allocated by her predecessor soa new animal shelter for homeless pets can be built. I call this project the "Dog and Cat Hotel."But there's been no din rising from elected officials for action and an infusion of emergency county money since it was disclosed recently that the agency that provides food, shelter and other services to Harford's homeless people was about pluck out of money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett | January 28, 2001
So Socks finally got the boot. Senator and Mr. Clinton have decided the former first cat will no longer be a part of their former first family. So while Bill, Hillary and chocolate Labrador Buddy are off to start their new lives in New York (and Washington and Arkansas), Socks has been farmed out to Virginia to live with the former president's former White House secretary, Betty Currie. It's kind of a shame, says cat expert Helen F. Rogers, because cats have feelings, too. "I think you should really think hard about bringing an animal in your home," says Rogers, a volunteer for Baltimore County's Humane Society.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 17, 1998
INSIDE A JAPANESE 7-11 -- What, no Big Gulps? No chili dogs? No nachos with cheese?Some people just don't know how to live.Sushi, tempura shrimp, seaweed wraps -- they're all in the prepared-food section. So are teriyaki burgers, ready to be zapped in the microwave.As with all 7-11s, though, the main action is at the counter.Doughnuts aren't available, but you can choose from steamed pastries stuffed with meat, mushrooms, even pumpkin.Then there is the steamed fish known as Oden, waiting to be selected from a dish of boiling water that also includes vegetables, eggs, even squid.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 6, 2013
The town, or more precisely, Harford County, is going to the dogs and cats. At least that's the hope of those at the Humane Society of Harford County who have partnered with the Art Rooms Professional Art Supplies to host a fun competition as a fundraiser. The Art Rooms Professional Art Supplies is inviting artists of all ages and abilities to join them for an art show and benefit to raise funds for the homeless and neglected animals at the Humane Society of Harford County. The Arts Rooms is not looking for Harford County's next Picasso, but they are looking for artists to shine the spotlight on our furry friends and raise funds for their care while having fun and letting the creative juices flow.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez and For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
You've probably seen the list floating around Facebook and email chains. It claims that dozens of brands of popular pet treats are linked to the deaths of dogs and cats, and that you should throw them all away. Is it true? Depends who you believe. The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning about chicken jerky products from China in November 2011, which it started investigating in 2007. Last year, the agency added duck and sweet potato jerky to its investigation.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
It's Baltimore Restaurant Week -- to benefit the city's neediest dogs and cats. This week a number of Baltimore restaurants have agreed to donate a portion from every check to the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter. Every night, one restaurant is offering the deal. Tonight it's Pierpoint in Fells Point. Here's how it works: Tonight, Tuesday Oct. 25: Pierpoint , 1822 Aliceanna St., will donate 10 percent of the check from guests that make a reservation under the name "BARCS.
NEWS
By Tami Metz | August 1, 2011
Because I no longer live in Baltimore City, one might think I no longer have a dog in this fight. I do still own a home in Baltimore, though, and I work in the inner city five days a week, frequenting many economically challenged neighborhoods. In my travels, I have observed utter horror in the treatment of some of Baltimore's animals. The plight of many dogs and cats in this city is devastatingly cruel. There is no escape for them. Torture, starvation and hopelessness radiate from empty eyes.
EXPLORE
By David Tayman, D.V.M | June 6, 2011
Q: What should we know when it comes to controlling fleas on our dog and cats? A: Fleas are truly the kind of creatures that give parasites their bad name. Despite the fact that Americans spend something like $9 billion annually fighting them, fleas are extremely adept at torturing us and our pets. When I first started in veterinary medicine almost 40 years ago, flea control products were crude, overly toxic and not very effective. Over the years, the old flea collars, sprays and powders have been replaced by an evolving arsenal of products that are safer for pets, humans and the environment, and much more effective.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
Minutes after Simon was introduced to his new feline pied-a-terre Thursday morning, the tabby lazed in kitty bliss, perhaps aware he was enjoying more space and finer quarters than any of the thousands of cats that have passed through the Maryland SPCA. With a $2.1 million renovation unveiled Thursday, the Baltimore shelter's most significant update since it was built in the 1970s, Simon and the rest of the homeless animals are not only more comfortable — shelter officials believe they have a better chance of finding homes.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez and For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
You've probably seen the list floating around Facebook and email chains. It claims that dozens of brands of popular pet treats are linked to the deaths of dogs and cats, and that you should throw them all away. Is it true? Depends who you believe. The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning about chicken jerky products from China in November 2011, which it started investigating in 2007. Last year, the agency added duck and sweet potato jerky to its investigation.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff writer | August 23, 1993
Welcome to the wild, wonderful, wacky world of everything anyone could possibly need, want or imagine for the family pet.Pet products from the practical to the sublimely ridiculous were displayed at the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association, Inc. trade show, held this weekend at Baltimore's Convention Center. More than 300 manufacturers showed their wares to the 2,000 retail shop owners and distributors who attended, says Clare DeNicola, APPMA spokeswoman. The show was not open to the public, but the products there will be available at pet stores this year.
NEWS
December 14, 2008
Columbia Art Center sponsoring 'Doghouse' Columbia Art Center, 6100 Foreland Garth, Long Reach Village Center, will continue to sponsor its Doghouse of Joy through Tuesday, in conjunction with Columbia Association's 2008 "Season of Giving." Items that can be dropped off include: laundry detergent and bleach, paper towels, tall kitchen drawstring bags, disinfectant floor cleaner, antibacterial dishwashing liquid, canned dog and cat food, cat litter, bathroom rugs, cloth towels and meat-flavored baby food.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | January 23, 2008
Agness Fulton Bond, who had been the school nurse at Bryn Mawr School for nearly three decades, died Saturday of complications from Addison's disease at her Roland Park Place home. She was 83. Agness Cator Fulton was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. She was a 1941 graduate of Roland Park Country School and earned her nursing degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in 1946. Mrs. Bond began her nursing career at the old Hospital for Women of Maryland and later joined the staff at Union Memorial Hospital.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.