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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
An Owings Mills High School graduate who is being held in military detention at Guantanamo Bay showed his willingness to become an al-Qaida martyr by participating in a plot to assassinate Pakistan's president, the government alleges in classified documents obtained by media outlets. The government also believes Majid Khan, who moved with his family from Pakistan to Baltimore County in 1996, was involved in funneling money used in a 2003 bombing of a Marriott hotel in Jakarta, Indonesia, according to the documents provided to news outlets this week by WikiLeaks, a group opposed to government secrecy.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Former Mayor Sheila Dixon's city pension deal rankled many in 2010 - even sparking a small protest outside City Hall - but she did not get a free pass after being found guilty of embezzlement and perjury charges. To keep her $83,000 a year payout, Dixon had to donate $45,000 to charity, do 500 hours of community service and not seek office. Last week, Dixon was charged with a probation violation after falling almost $14,000 behind on the required payments, according to state records.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
The FBI raided Barry H. Landau's Manhattan apartment twice, hauling out thousands of documents that authorities say link him to a theft scheme involving historical artifacts pilfered from libraries and museums in Baltimore, elsewhere in the United States and in the United Kingdom. But agents didn't take everything from his $2,700-a-month rent-controlled apartment. The 63-year-old who was arrested in Baltimore in July is seeking permission from a federal judge to sell some of his prized artifacts to pay his rent and other "everyday living expenses" while he is out on bail awaiting trial.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Peter Hermann | June 27, 2012
Barry H. Landau, the once-esteemed collector of presidential memorabilia, was sentenced seven years in federal prison Wednesday for stealing thousands of historic documents from archives and libraries in Baltimore and up the East Coast. The 64-year-old was also ordered to pay roughly $46,000 in restitution. No sentencing date is yet set for his 25-year-old accomplice, Jason James Savedoff, who, like Landau, has pleaded guilty to theft of major artwork and conspiracy charges. More than 10,000 “objects of cultural heritage” worth more than $1 million - including letters signed by George Washington, John Hancock, John Adams, Karl Marx, Marie Antoinette and Napoleon Bonaparte - were recovered from Landau's Manhattan apartment, according to court records.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
Jason Savedoff may not have just stolen notable documents from the Maryland Historical Society, as police have charged, but prosecutors say he may have flushed at least one down a toilet as police closed in. Assistant State's Attorney Tracy Varda told a judge Tuesday that the document could not be recovered and it is not clear what it was. The new twist came during the first of separate Baltimore Circuit Court bail hearings for Savedoff and...
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
The former owner of the Senator Theatre told a police officer "he wished to be arrested in an attempt to get the media involved," according to charging documents in the Aug. 13 incident outside the Baltimore cinema. Tom Kiefaber was arrested that day and charged with trespassing. Below is the text of the charging document; it also appears as a related item (see left). There are seven charges filed against Kiefaber by James "Buzz" Cusack, current operator of the Senator: five counts of trespassing, one count of harassment and an accusation of illegal dumping (at the Senator on Aug. 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
By JAMES COATES and JAMES COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 30, 2001
I received my son's Gateway 2000 four months ago. All went well, until my documents ended with a long string of words that look like commands. I deleted them, but they always returned when I pulled up the documents. Some samples: Normal, Default Paragraph Font, Times New Roman, Symbol, Family name (repeated 8 times), -PID-GUID, 0c7BCE23-535A-11D5-A55F-0000C50C7445, Root Entry, Summary Information). Your fix is as easy as "Save As." Somehow, you started saving your documents in a format other than the format used by the word processor software that you are using.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration has turned over more than 10,000 pages of documents to a City Council committee conducting a wide-ranging investigation into Baltimore's speed camera program. Councilman James B. Kraft, chairman of the committee, said he's received 10,000 to 12,000 pages of documents. He believes the mayor may turn over far more, he said. In February, Kraft delivered a letter to Rawlings-Blake seeking 31 batches of documents involving nearly all aspects of the once-lucrative cameras, which have been offline since last spring.
NEWS
By Steve Yanda, The Washington Post | August 19, 2010
University of Virginia lacrosse player Yeardley Love was so angry at George Huguely V in the days before she was killed that she hit him with her purse, spilling its contents all over the floor, according to court documents released Wednesday. Love, 22, a Cockeysville resident and graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School, left Huguely's off-campus apartment without some items from the thrown purse, including her cell phone, forcing the former couple to communicate via e-mail, the documents say. Love showed a teammate an e-mail Huguely sent to her, the papers say. The contents of the e-mail were redacted from the court papers, but a source who spoke to that teammate said the e-mail, viewed on April 30, was described as threatening.
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