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By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
The newly renovated AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in Silver Spring is holding its first documentary film festival Wednesday through June 22. The Silverdocs Festival will feature more than 70 documentary films, including 21 foreign, on topics ranging from architecture to the Sudan to women's tennis. The festival will open with the North American premiere of Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin, by Time magazine film critic and filmmaker Richard Schickel. "The opening-night film was one of those serendipitous things," says Nina Gilden Seavey, director of the Silverdocs Festival.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Despite evidence to the contrary, Baltimore-born Claire Kosloff insists that there's no Charm City Mafia operating behind the scenes of Lifetime's "Supermarket Superstar. " No, she swears, it's just a coincidence that the show's host (Stacy Keibler) is from Baltimore, that one of its contestants (Nikki Lewis) is from Baltimore and that the show's co-executive producer (Kosloff) is from Baltimore. "There's a bunch of Baltimore people, but it's just by accident," says Kosloff, who supervised much of the show's writing, directing and behind-the-scenes planning.
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NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | October 6, 1996
The !Kung Bushmen of Africa's Kalahari desert are a people trapped by the myths art has created about them. Their unhappy history, and how it was shaped by a series of documentary films, is the subject of a projected PBS series now in development.In the early 1950s a young man named John Marshall traveled to the Kalahari in what was then South West Africa and began shooting what eventually would become some 1 million feet of film documenting the way of life of the indigenous desert people called !
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
The CBS Sports Network does some drum beating for March Madness Monday night with " The Miracles : The 1988 Kansas Jayhawks," a documentary about how an underdog team won the national championship that year. Known as Danny and the Miracles, because of star Danny Manning, Kansas upset the Oklahoma Sooners for the championship. There are a couple of local angles worth noting in the film that marks the 25th anniversary of that championship. One of the producers is Tamiko Bullock, a graduate of Morgan State University.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Despite evidence to the contrary, Baltimore-born Claire Kosloff insists that there's no Charm City Mafia operating behind the scenes of Lifetime's "Supermarket Superstar. " No, she swears, it's just a coincidence that the show's host (Stacy Keibler) is from Baltimore, that one of its contestants (Nikki Lewis) is from Baltimore and that the show's co-executive producer (Kosloff) is from Baltimore. "There's a bunch of Baltimore people, but it's just by accident," says Kosloff, who supervised much of the show's writing, directing and behind-the-scenes planning.
NEWS
August 19, 1999
More than 55 people responded to last week's question: Columbia is home to a couple of multiplex movie theaters, and a larger multiplex is being planned for The Mall. Do you think Columbia needs a smaller art house that shows independent and foreign films and documentaries?I am pleading for an independent, small art theater. Every time I find a picture I want to see it's in Washington or downtown Baltimore or the other side of Baltimore at the Rotunda. Please, I've been writing letters and I remember it being promised by the Palace Theatre when it opened many years ago that there would be one, and it never happened.
NEWS
February 3, 1993
Aben KandelWrote screenplaysLOS ANGELES -- Aben Kandel, 96, who wrote the screenplay for such horror films as "I Was a Teenage Werewolf" and "Horrors of the Black Museum," died of heart failure Thursday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital, said his son, Stephen.Mr. Kandel also wrote Joan Crawford's last film, "Trog," and one of Leonard Nimoy's first, "Kid Monk Baroni."His other films included "The Iron Major," "The Knute Rockne Story" and "Dinner at Eight."Kandel also wrote the novels "Vaudeville" in 1927, "Black Sun" in 1929 and "City for Conquest" in 1936, which was made into a film starring James Cagney.
FEATURES
By Mark Dawidziak and Mark Dawidziak,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 1, 1992
Documentary filmmakers are accustomed to living without the renown of their wealthier Hollywood cousins. They know that the puffy paychecks and heady headlines will go to such Tinseltown directors as Oliver Stone, Martin Scorsese, Spike Lee and Steven Spielberg.Yet a modest splash of this recognition has trickled into Walpole, N.H., where documentary filmmaker Ken Burns operates his Florentine Films company.Although Mr. Burns may not be a household name, he certainly has established himself as the country's best-known documentary director.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | October 20, 1993
Soon after Sue Furman moved to Columbia's newest village, she would spend hours on the phone with River Hill's developer and county officials tracking down information about community development issues.It made her wonder whether there was a better way to inform the groups with a stake in the growing community -- old and new residents, the developer and county officials -- of development plans and to address growth-related problems.That question became the genesis of a documentary film Hal and Sue Furman are making about River Hill, chronicling the development of the village and examining how change affects established communities and how distinct communities can be brought together.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | June 18, 1995
Terry Zwigoff blames his unruly hair on a rainy Baltimore day. But the director has been similarly described in other interviews he's done while promoting his documentary movie about cult underground cartoonist Robert Crumb. His hair-raising "Crumb" opens Friday at the Charles Theater.Lamenting the journalistic fixation on his messy hair, Mr. Zwigoff comes across as a more genial version of his eternally kvetching subject. Slightly built, bearded and a tad disheveled, the 47-year-old Mr. Zwigoff is like a middle-aged poster child for casual nonconformity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
The relationship between some members of the Baltimore Ravens and the community runs deeper than just on-field victories. And Friday, the USA cable channel features one of the those players, linebacker Jameel McClain, in a film about the way he reached out to a homeless boy in our city. "NFL Characters Unite," an hour-long documentary of professional football players sharing stories of obstacles they have overcome, features Justin Tuck (New York Giants), Troy Polamalu (Pittsburgh Steelers)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and For The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Local film fans may have a leg up on the competition when it comes to their Oscar pools, thanks to the folks at the Maryland Film Festival and Chesapeake Film Festival. "Beasts of the Southern Wild," which enjoyed a long run at The Charles Theatre last year, received four nods among the Oscar nominations announced Thursday morning in Los Angeles. The film had its Baltimore premiere June 5 at MICA, before an audience culled from members of the Maryland Film Festival's Friends of the Festival program.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
William George "Bill" Homewood, a retired British Airways executive and an accomplished transocean sailor who set a record in 1984 for a westbound Atlantic crossing during the Observer Transatlantic Singlehanded Race, died Sunday of a pulmonary embolism at Hilton Head Island Medical Center in Hilton Head, N.C. The former longtime Edgewater resident was 75. The son of a British military officer and a homemaker, Mr. Homewood was born in London....
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | January 10, 2007
Weekend warriors, clad in homemade armor and wielding fearsome-looking weapons, travel throughout the Baltimore area to experience the wonders of battle. But thanks to the Internet, the rest of us need never step outside our dens to join in the rampage. Darkon, an award-winning documentary centering on everyday folks whose love of medieval sword-and-sorcery extends well beyond conventional game-playing, is available for free on a new AOL-sponsored Web site. This month, visitors to truestories.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 8, 2006
NO ONE MAKES documentaries the way David Sutherland does. And perhaps no one ever will; the toll is too great. Though not a household name like Ken Burns, Sutherland is considered by those who know documentaries to be one of the nation's greatest practitioners of the form. He also is renowned for his obsessive attention to detail, extraordinary use of live sound and his habit of living months, even years, with his subjects. Before cameras rolled on his best-known work, PBS' The Farmer's Wife, a portrait of a young husband and wife as they struggle to save their farm, Sutherland visited 43 rural families and lived with each for as long as two weeks in search of the right couple.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 26, 2005
Shifting from a documentary about a spelling bee to a deadpan comedy centering on a chronic stutterer would seem to require a whole new set of directing muscles, but Jeffrey Blitz insists the change from cinematic fact to fiction isn't as drastic as it might sound. "You have more control over a documentary than most people think you do, and you have less control over a fiction film than most people think you do," says Blitz, who's been in Baltimore since July 21 filming Rocket Science, his first film since debuting three years ago with the Oscar-nominated documentary Spellbound.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | August 8, 1993
They may be strapped to their seats thousands of feet above the Atlantic Ocean, but British Airways passengers will hear the cacophony of sounds and witness the vibrant colors of this year's Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair livestock auction.The annual auction, which benefits individual 4-H'ers, was filmed by Kevan Pegley of the Spafax Airline Network Inc. in Britain for a documentary announcing British Airways' merger with USAir.The merger will allow British Airways to begin flying out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport in September.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | January 10, 2007
Weekend warriors, clad in homemade armor and wielding fearsome-looking weapons, travel throughout the Baltimore area to experience the wonders of battle. But thanks to the Internet, the rest of us need never step outside our dens to join in the rampage. Darkon, an award-winning documentary centering on everyday folks whose love of medieval sword-and-sorcery extends well beyond conventional game-playing, is available for free on a new AOL-sponsored Web site. This month, visitors to truestories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
The newly renovated AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in Silver Spring is holding its first documentary film festival Wednesday through June 22. The Silverdocs Festival will feature more than 70 documentary films, including 21 foreign, on topics ranging from architecture to the Sudan to women's tennis. The festival will open with the North American premiere of Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin, by Time magazine film critic and filmmaker Richard Schickel. "The opening-night film was one of those serendipitous things," says Nina Gilden Seavey, director of the Silverdocs Festival.
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