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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 3, 1994
It says something profoundly depressing about society that the classiest person in Nick Broomfield's documentary "Aileen Wuornos: The Selling of a Serial Killer" is Aileen Wuornos. She's even better behaved than Broomfield! And she probably could have made a better movie!The film, screening at 7 and 9 tonight and tomorrow at the Baltimore Museum of Art under the auspices of the Baltimore Film Forum's First Look series, is a jaundiced, amusing look at a horrifying subject relevant today: a feeding frenzy of cash-mad parasites swirling around a notorious act of murder.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
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By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 15, 2013
The Cartoon Network continues its conversation with kids and families about speaking up against bullying with a special presentation of "The Bully Effect" at 5:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 28. Produced as part of the Cartoon Network's "Stop Bullying: Speak Up " initiative and presented commercial-free, the show is a half-hour CNN original documentary abridged for family audiences featuring additional original content, including a...
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Graduated Boys' Latin lacrosse standout Shack Stanwick ,  The Sun's All-Metro Player of the Year and Male Athlete of the Year, will be featured in a 30-minute documentary titled "Undeniable: The Road to the All-America Game. " The show, which will run on ESPNU in advance of the Under Armour All-America Lacrosse Classic this weekend, follows Stanwick -- signed with Johns Hopkins -- and Jake Seau, who is the son of former NFL great Junior Seau and is set to play lacrosse at Duke.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Actor William H. Macy, will offer a bit of Hollywood glamour to a documentary about his home state. According to the Cumberland Times-News, Macy is going to appear in the Maryland Public Television production "Our Town," which takes a look at Cumberland and Frostburg. Macy graduated from Allegany High School in 1968, the paper says. “Getting Bill Macy was beyond our wildest dreams,” Rick Lore, vice president of MPT told the paper, adding the program will open and close with the actor, who was nominated for an Oscar for his role in "Fargo.
NEWS
October 14, 2011
The Public Broadcasting Service recently presented a two-hour documentary on the War of 1812, the so-called "forgotten war. " Well, they forgot to include the Battle of North Point, one of the few land battles the Americans won against the British. While the show went into great detail describing American failures under inept generals, it ignored Gen. Sam Smith and the few Army regulars, militiamen and ordinary citizens under his command who prevented the British from capturing Baltimore and laying siege to Fort McHenry from the land side.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | September 5, 2013
  WWE Hall of Famer The Iron Sheik is currently crowdsourcing for a documentary on his life . To some, he is a world class amateur wrestler, a hero in his home country of Iran, a former WWE champion and one of the best pro wrestlers of all time. Others see him as a man troubled by drug and alcohol abuse and a comical caricature of the once mighty figure he portrayed on worldwide television. Whatever perception you may have of the man, expect all topics to be addressed in this documentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 7, 2010
The making of the Oscar-nominated movie "Music by Prudence" is a tale of two schools, one in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, and one in Baltimore. A favorite for best short documentary at tonight's Academy Awards, this 33-minute flight presents an affecting portrait of its tough, gifted title character, the singer-songwriter in a band of disabled youths at the King George VI School & Centre for Children With Physical Disabilities in Bulawayo. Prudence Mabhena suffers from arthrogryposis, a condition that deforms joints and cost her both her legs.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
"12 O'Clock Boys," a documentary looking at West Baltimore dirt bikers, will get its world premiere at next month's South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin, Texas. Director Lotfy Nathan's film was one of eight documentary features chosen to be screened at the festival, out of more than 900 submitted for consideration. The film centers on 13-year-old Pug, who desperately wants to join the West Baltimore dirt-bike gang that gives Nathan's work its title. The SXSW website says the film "presents the pivotal years of change in a boy's life growing up in one of the most dangerous and economically depressed cities in the U.S. " Director Nathan, who began working on "12 O'Clock Boys" in 2008, is currently trying to raise $30,000 through kickstarter.com to complete post-production on the film, including color correction, sound design and mixing, music licensing and getting to SXSW.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexa Cottman-Robinson and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
In a scene from the documentary "A Place of Truth," opening Thursday at the Creative Alliance , Abi Mott sits behind a small desk on a city street corner with a sign that reads: "Name a price. Pick a subject. Get a poem. " She is greeted by a customer and after a quick exchange of money; she enters words on a vintage typewriter. Moments later, Mott hands her customer a short poem and smiles. "This is what she wrote for me," says the customer, eyes filled with tears, as she begins to read the lyrics out loud.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 3, 2014
His family doesn't know if Zack actually heard any of it firsthand. Maybe he was at that City Council meeting (some people swear he was) or maybe not. Either way, they figure he probably knew about the things that were said, how his neighbors in the small town of Norman, Okla., paraded to the microphone that evening in 2010 to denounce the proclamation of GLBT -- Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender -- History Month. They warned of a "slippery slope" to hate-crime laws, said gay people were out to "recruit" children, claimed 78 percent of all gay people have -- and die from -- sexually transmitted diseases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexa Cottman-Robinson and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
In a scene from the documentary "A Place of Truth," opening Thursday at the Creative Alliance , Abi Mott sits behind a small desk on a city street corner with a sign that reads: "Name a price. Pick a subject. Get a poem. " She is greeted by a customer and after a quick exchange of money; she enters words on a vintage typewriter. Moments later, Mott hands her customer a short poem and smiles. "This is what she wrote for me," says the customer, eyes filled with tears, as she begins to read the lyrics out loud.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
It took decades before serious documentaries about the civil rights struggle of the 1960s began to appear. But less than a year after some of the biggest victories in the fight for same-sex marriage, a social movement often compared to civil rights, compelling nonfiction films chronicling that history are already starting to arrive. I'm not certain whether such near-instant history will prove to be a good or bad thing, but it's sure to shape the way the fight for marriage equality and gay rights is perceived in future battlegrounds and by future generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
I am not looking to make a big deal out of this, but I thought at least one mainstream media critic ought to point out that CNN plans to air what it's calling a "documentary" about George H.W. Bush Sunday night in prime time, starting at 9. Except it's not a documentary as the word is used to describe the work of a filmmaker like Ken Burns or Frederick Wiseman. It's not even a documentary as the word might be used to describe an extended report of 30 minutes or so about a historic building airing on your hometown TV news station.
FEATURES
By Amanda Krotki and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
It's here! It's queer! Go to it!  B'more Qfest - Baltimore's Queer Film and Media Festival -- strives to build relationships with the community and bring LGBT-themed films to Baltimore on a regular basis. The event comes back to Baltimore June 12-15 with opening and closing night festivities, parties and more than 40 films -- many of them Maryland premieres. Screenings take place at MICA Brown Center, Fred Lazarus Studio Center at MICA, Theater Project, Yellow Sign Theater and 1727 N. Charles St. Individual tickets for regular screenings are $10 each.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
If you want to feel good again about what's possible for public television, don't miss “Coming Back with Wes Moore,” which airs Tuesday night on Maryland Public Television. At a time in American life when we are seeing reports of veterans dying while waiting months and even years for basic care at Veterans Affairs hospitals, this documentary about soldiers returning to civilian life after combat in Iraq and Afghanistan is timely and deeply touching. The best-selling Baltimore author, who served as a combat officer in Afghanistan, sets out to chronicle the stories of veterans who have survived the battlefield, in some cases only to face even deadlier challenges at home.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured distant reaches of the universe over the past 22 years, but with the end of the space shuttle program, has not been repaired since 2009. A filmmaker is challenging that decision with the documentary "Saving Hubble" and will speak in Baltimore on Tuesday. David Gaynes will speak at the Space Telescope Science Institute with his message about saving Hubble, which is expected to continue operating only through next year. NASA is focused on replacing Hubble with the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
When filmmaker Ramona Persaud decided to home-school her children, she soon realized how difficult it would be. "I would keep asking [my daughter], 'Why aren't you getting this? Why aren't you remembering?' And telling her, 'We can sit here all day,'" Persaud said. "She was getting visibly frustrated and stressed, as was I. It was just not working. " Then Persaud came across a teaching approach - the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model developed by a Baltimore educator in one of the highest-performing schools in the city - that she said gave her a reality check.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
If you think Kevin Spacey is something special as Frank Underwood, you should see him as Richard III. And with the documentary “Now: In the Wings on a World Stage” debuting this week, the lines of influence between Spacey's work in Shakespeare and “House of Cards” will be on global display. Spacey funded, produced and stars in the film directed by Sam Mendes, with whom he worked in the feature film “American Beauty.” The 90-minute production follows Spacey and a troupe of actors that includes Gemma Jones as they take the play about the monstrous monarch on tour.
TRAVEL
By Jada Vanderpool, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
In a precursor to summer, Maryland Public Television will take beach lovers on a behind-the-scenes tour of Ocean City with its new documentary “Downee Ocean, Hon!” The one-hour program premieres April 21 at 9 p.m. during the station's Chesapeake Bay Week. “Downee Ocean, Hon” peeks into Ocean City's rich family traditions and town history. From the sunset on the bay and salt water taffy to the small town's vivid nightlife, the documentary captures it all. “We count a lot of different small stories," says Mike English, producer of "Downee Ocean, Hon. " "We look at life on the boardwalk, we look at beach life, we look at some of the interesting characters that ocean city is known for…what we're trying to do is strike a chord with our viewers.” English says he was inspired by the beach town's memories and reputation as a family fun spot.
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