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BUSINESS
September 5, 1996
Genesis Health Ventures of Kennett Square, Pa., yesterday announced that it will pay $10 million for a 10 percent stake in Doctors Health System of Owings Mills. When Doctors Health meets operational and financial benchmarks, Genesis will invest another $10 million to bring its ownership interest to about 20 percent.Genesis, which has nursing home networks in five markets, has been active in the Baltimore area. It owns more than a dozen nursing homes in the area, and in April bought Baltimore-based NeighborCare Pharmacies for $57.25 million, absorbing it into its institutional pharmacy division, called ASCO.
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
The chief financial officer at Anne Arundel Medical Center is watching the fight over federal spending closely. If the federal government goes through with sequestration cuts beginning today, Maryland stands to lose millions of dollars in health-related funding that could leave hospitals such as Anne Arundel Medical Center looking for ways to make up lost revenue without weakening medical care. "We're here for the community and, like all hospitals, we are here 24/7 and will not jeopardize the care of patients," said Bob Reilly, the Annapolis hospital's finance director.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 1996
Doctors Health System said it made a deal with a Hagerstown medical practice that allows the fast-growing Owings Mills firm to expand its network of physicians into Washington County.Quality Health Care IPA appointed Doctors Health as the exclusive agent for its doctors in negotiating with managed care organizations. Quality Health has 18 doctors and four nurse practitioners who serve more than 40,000 patients.Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.Doctors Health is a 2-year-old, physician-owned company that has merged independent medical practices in a bid to give health care providers more control of patient care by giving them more leverage in talks with health maintenance organizations.
NEWS
By Monae Johnson | May 10, 2012
The Supreme Court's ruling on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, expected in June, will determine the future for countless Americans. Health care reform debates have elevated the plight of millions of uninsured Americans to the national consciousness. However, the physician workforce that would be needed to care for millions of newly insured people deserves equal attention. There is a growing shortage of primary care physicians in the U.S., and it has been forecasted for decades.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1996
Doctors Health System yesterday announced a move into Anne Arundel County, as eight doctors in a pediatric group and three internists became partners in DHS."We are currently engaged in discussions with an additional seven or eight individual practices and a number of large groups. We expect the new medical group to grow to over 60 primary-care physicians and affiliated providers in the next year," said Dr. Robert G. Graw Jr., head of the pediatric group.Dr. Graw also will become vice president of practice operations for DHS.The announcement brings the total number of primary-care physicians involved -- including those with contractual ties as well as partners -- to 253. Nearly 100 are partners.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
Doctors Health Inc. of Owings Mills has filed for bankruptcy protection and reorganization.Company officials could not be reached for comment on the Chapter 11 filing. But Blue Cross officials confirmed that Doctors Health has canceled its largest remaining contract, under which it cared for about 8,800 Blue Cross HMO patients.Dr. Scott Rifkin, who resigned as chairman of Doctors Health in April but remains a stockholder and a participating physician, said yesterday that he believes the company has about 25 employees managing medical practices.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Doctors Health, the largest of about half-a-dozen local doctor-owned physician groups, said yesterday that the Securities and Exchange Commission has approved its registration to offer 4.1 million shares in stock to physicians.The SEC's approval positions Doctors Health -- which has been exchanging stock to acquire medical practices -- to continue to grow.The registration statement does not allow Doctors Health to offer stock to the public, something it has indicated it might do later.Before it could do a public offering, it must receive SEC approval and amend its statement, said Paul Serini, executive vice president and director of legal services.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1995
Gaining size and market clout, Doctors Health System has obtained $8 million in new financing and joined forces with Baltimore Medical Systems to care for Medicare and Medicaid HMO patients.Doctors Health bills itself as Maryland's biggest doctor-owned health system. Baltimore Medical Systems is a community health center organization treating patients at six locations in the city.They announced yesterday they have formed a third organization, Baltimore Medical Alliance, LLC, which will offer physician and hospital services primarily to Medicare and Medicaid patients in health maintenance organizations.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
Stewart B. Gold resigned yesterday as chief executive officer of financially troubled Doctors Health Inc., but said the company's investors were prepared to put up enough money to assure the company could operate through 1999.Doctors Health, based in Owings Mills, laid off 52 of its 148 headquarters' staff two weeks ago, after losing its largest contract.In an annual report filed Sept. 28 with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company said that it had lost $40 million in its fiscal year ended June 30; that "there is substantial doubt as to the company's ability to continue as a going concern"; and that it might have to seek bankruptcy protection without an infusion of capital.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
In a sign of the difficulties besetting groups of doctors aligned to secure managed care contracts, one area entity has thrown in the towel while another has retrenched after losing business.New American Health, the managed care contracting arm of the North Arundel Health System, is closing, with the loss of about 40 jobs. Doctors Health, of Owings Mills, laid off 52 of its 148 headquarters staff members this week after losing a major contract.Doctors Health is the largest of the so-called equity model physician groups in the area.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
The Maryland medical society and attorney general's office launched a website Saturday aimed at helping doctors file complaints with the state when insurance companies refuse to cover patient care. "Essentially, our goal was to educate our patients and our physicians that there is an avenue for these complaints," said Gene Ransom III, CEO of MedChi, the state medical society. "We thought, 'Let's make it easier.'" The site, called Insurance Watch, is hosted on the Internet by the medical society.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2005
For the past five years, top-ranking Democratic Party official Bradley Marshall has squeezed time into his jammed schedule to visit Baltimore - for his annual physical. But getting an appointment isn't as easy as it used to be. Marshall is one of more than a thousand people who participate each year in Johns Hopkins Medicine's Executive Health Program, a project created a decade ago by Dr. George H. Sack Jr. in part to change the way doctors administer annual physical exams. "It used to be your doctor looked down your throat, checked your blood pressure and sent you on your way," says Marshall, 50, the chief financial officer for the Democratic National Committee in Washington.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 28, 2004
I'm about to have hip surgery, and I'm worried after I read an article that said anesthesia might lead to memory loss. What can you tell me about it? Researchers at Duke University Medical Center found that major surgery is associated with a drop in test scores for concentration, mental speed and verbal ability in some elderly patients. The surgeries in the study were primarily joint replacements, and the average age of the patients was 69. Two years after the surgery, 42 percent of them scored below their baseline pre-surgery tests.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2004
Cylex Inc. will use $6.4 million of newly received venture money to boost market acceptance of a testing technology the company says helps doctors to better measure the health of a patient's immune system, the Columbia-based biotechnology company said yesterday. Using the trademarked product name of "ImmuKnow," Cylex is making and marketing a test kit doctors use to monitor the immune-system health of organ-transplant recipients. The company will next position Immu- Know as a product physicians can employ to manage the treatments of patients with cancer, Hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS and other diseases that attack the immune system.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | January 4, 2004
When dissecting cadavers, most first-year students at Johns Hopkins Medical School protect their faces by wearing a large plastic shield that looks like a welder's mask. Mary Schuler just puts on an old pair of safety goggles -- the same ones she used for target practice as a Chicago cop. At 32, Schuler is taking aim at a radically different career, which makes her an object of curiosity among the 118 other aspiring physicians in Hopkins' Class of 2007. "People say to me all the time, 'You don't look like a police officer,' " notes Schuler.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
Last winter the National Football League revised its marketing game plan and lifted a self-imposed ban on doing business with drug companies. Bayer Pharmaceuticals and GlaxoSmithKline - joint distributors of the new erectile dysfunction pill, Levitra - quickly signed a three-year sponsorship deal worth a reported $18 million. Those new bedfellows have just launched a public education campaign titled Tackling Men's Health. TMH is geared toward pulling the average-guy football fan away from his buffalo wings long enough to get him up to speed on a variety of topics, including diabetes, stress, heart disease, mental and sexual health and prostate irregularities.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
Doctors Health System and Montgomery County Network agreed yesterday to band together to create one of the largest doctor-controlled health systems in the state, with more than 250 primary-care physicians.Under the 15-year agreement, the two organizations will not merge.Instead, Montgomery County Network will grant Owings Mills-based Doctors Health the exclusive right to negotiate service contracts with insurers, hospitals and managed-care companies for its primary-care physicians, said Dr. Scott Rifkin, founder of Doctors Health.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1997
University of Maryland Medicine will invest $5 million in Doctors Health System, the state's largest independent physician group, as part of an affiliation plan announced in April.The two entities announced the investment yesterday, along with the signing of a 10-year working agreement.With its $5 million, University of Maryland Medicine buys the stock held by Medical Mutual Liability Insurance Society of Maryland, a malpractice insurer that was an early investor in Doctors Health.University of Maryland Medicine consists of the medical school and health system -- a large general hospital, rehabilitation facilities and community clinics.
BUSINESS
By Liz Steinberg and Liz Steinberg,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2002
The first time Norma Aisquith found herself engulfed in what she described as a "bright aroma," she admitted she was a little frightened. But then the light began to comfort her. Now, she's recommending it to her friends. And that's just how Ralph Venuto Sr., founder and chief executive of the Mount Laurel, N.J.-based Hollywood Tan franchise, likes it. Aisquith, a 54-year-old Glen Burnie resident with red hair and a pale complexion, went tanning for the first time with her daughter and sister at Hollywood's new salon in Glen Burnie's Harundale Plaza.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and Jane E. Allen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 8, 2001
Doctors are said to make lousy patients. Now comes a study indicating that many docs avoid being patients altogether. Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine decided to examine how well doctors took care of their health after previous studies suggested that doctors' bad habits -- among them smoking and drinking -- influence what they tell patients. Using annual health surveys completed by graduates, they found that a surprising number of physicians -- about one in three -- had no regular source of care, even though they had ready access and were better educated and could more easily afford it than the average American.
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