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By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
Montgomery County police face a long, hard road as they try to build a criminal case against a nurse they suspect of causing the deaths of one or more critically ill patients, including a woman who died Independence Day weekend at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital. Legal experts say convictions, and even indictments, of doctors or nurses are rare because prosecutors have to prove that the defendants wanted to kill their patients - and did. Proving that can be difficult because their victims may be critically ill, and the complexity of medical records can be daunting.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Moira Mattingly had only been pregnant for about 24 weeks - still plenty of time, she thought, to pick a name for her daughter. So when she went to the hospital with some discomfort - small pains coming every seven minutes - the news that she was going into labor was alarming. The baby's lungs weren't fully formed, her skin barely so. Mattingly was also confronting sobering statistics: Babies born before 26 weeks, called micropreemies, can easily die and have a high chance of lifelong medical problems like cerebral palsy and blindness.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 6, 1991
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Senior medical officers in the Persian Gulf say they are prepared to treat heavy casualties in the event of combat, but many of the doctors and nurses who will handle patients say they lack important medical supplies and modern equipment.Casualty estimates, as well as numbers of hospital beds and medical personnel, are among the Pentagon's most closely held secrets.But military medical planners say they are relying on a range of equipment -- from scores of 50-bed mobile Air Force field hospitals to fully equipped 1,000-bed Navy hospital ships -- in preparation for the "worst case," an outcome that some experts say could result in as many as 10,000 to 20,000 American wounded and dead among the 430,000 troops expected to be deployed by the end of the month.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Johns Hopkins recently cleared the $200 million mark in grants received as part of federal stimulus spending, demonstrating that not even a deep recession could choke the university's ability to attract research money. The Johns Hopkins University recently cleared the $200 million mark in grants received as part of federal stimulus spending, demonstrating that not even a deep recession could choke its ability to attract research money. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act gave $12.4 billion to the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation for grants to be distributed between February 2009 and September 2010.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
Dr. Mojtaba Gashti, the Baltimore surgeon who brought a Haitian boy to the U.S. to remove an enormous tumor that might have otherwise killed him, has been named 2009 Public Citizen of the Year by the Maryland Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. Gashti, chief of vascular surgery at Union Memorial Hospital, was honored by the group for his humanitarian missions to Haiti, an annual medical pilgrimage he has made to the impoverished country since 1994. In February, Gashti brought 13-year-old Osly St. Preux and his mother to Baltimore, put them up at his Ellicott City home and arranged for the boy's surgeries.
NEWS
By Monica Lopossay | July 20, 2008
I walked into a dark auditorium with my laptop, a photo slide show ready and butterflies in my belly. I thought, "I'll do OK." After all, I had the laughing horse photo, my secret weapon. Kids love the laughing horse. I was asked by Rob Paymer, a former Sun photography intern who now is director of Bridges, a summer continuing-education program at St. Paul's School, to speak to a crowd of third-, fourth- and fifth-graders. After the slide show (the laughing horse is now famous at Bridges)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2001
Lacking experience in battlefield injuries, doctors and nurses with the Air Force will soon train at a Baltimore hospital where the caseload is sadly similar to that seen in combat. Under an agreement signed Friday, the Air Force will start sending medical teams to Maryland Shock Trauma Center next month. There the teams will quickly gain experience treating open wounds, multiple fractures and head injuries -- much like the injuries they would see if deployed to makeshift hospitals near a battlefront.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 2002
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba - One captive expressed surprise when he woke up after surgery to repair a gunshot wound he had suffered in Afghanistan. He told his doctor he thought he was going to be killed. Several other captives have thanked doctors and nurses for easing their pain by treating their wounds and infections. The Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners brought to Guantanamo for confinement and medical care until American officials can figure out what to do with them are supposed to be among the hardest of a hard lot. But the medical staff brought in to treat them say they have generally been cooperative and appreciative.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2008
Kim Cass knows better than most how traumatic a trip to the emergency room can be for a child. For about 12 years, Cass, a pediatrician, has seen a lot of children more upset about their visit to the emergency room than their illness. "With the bright lights, equipment, and doctors and nurses everywhere, it can be really scary for a child," said Cass, the director of pediatric emergency medicine at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. In an effort to help kids feel more at ease, Cass is holding the first Teddy Bear Clinic in the hospital's pediatric emergency room.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
Doctors and nurses could find themselves paying the bill for tighter regulation of them under a measure moving through the Maryland General Assembly.The proposal would give the state licensing boards that regulate doctors and nurses more freedom to spend the money they raise through licensing fees.The boards are eager for the bill, saying they don't have enough money to do their job of licensing and regulating health professionals."Right now, they feel that they don't have adequate resources to do the job," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., who introduced the bill on behalf of the State Board of Physician Quality Assurance.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
Dr. Mojtaba Gashti, the Baltimore surgeon who brought a Haitian boy to the U.S. to remove an enormous tumor that might have otherwise killed him, has been named 2009 Public Citizen of the Year by the Maryland Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. Gashti, chief of vascular surgery at Union Memorial Hospital, was honored by the group for his humanitarian missions to Haiti, an annual medical pilgrimage he has made to the impoverished country since 1994. In February, Gashti brought 13-year-old Osly St. Preux and his mother to Baltimore, put them up at his Ellicott City home and arranged for the boy's surgeries.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
The tyke in the Tigers cap drew his foot back, kicked as hard as he could and sent the soccer ball rolling toward the net. Jordan Champion, 3, of Suitland, decked out in a T-shirt that read "A Monster Ate My Socks," didn't seem to care all that much whether his shot eluded the goalie across from him, a 47-year-old physician named Fernando Mena. Neither did Mena, who just happened to let the ball roll through his legs. When the cluster of grown-ups around Jordan burst into applause, it was for his bigger triumph: Like the dozens of other kids and 200 or so parents on hand for a celebration at the Hippodrome on Saturday, he spent his first few weeks clinging to life in the neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU, of University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2008
Kim Cass knows better than most how traumatic a trip to the emergency room can be for a child. For about 12 years, Cass, a pediatrician, has seen a lot of children more upset about their visit to the emergency room than their illness. "With the bright lights, equipment, and doctors and nurses everywhere, it can be really scary for a child," said Cass, the director of pediatric emergency medicine at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. In an effort to help kids feel more at ease, Cass is holding the first Teddy Bear Clinic in the hospital's pediatric emergency room.
NEWS
By Monica Lopossay | July 20, 2008
I walked into a dark auditorium with my laptop, a photo slide show ready and butterflies in my belly. I thought, "I'll do OK." After all, I had the laughing horse photo, my secret weapon. Kids love the laughing horse. I was asked by Rob Paymer, a former Sun photography intern who now is director of Bridges, a summer continuing-education program at St. Paul's School, to speak to a crowd of third-, fourth- and fifth-graders. After the slide show (the laughing horse is now famous at Bridges)
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2007
TRIPOLI, Libya -- The fate of five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian doctor sentenced to death for allegedly infecting children with the AIDS virus remained in the hands of Libya's top judicial body yesterday, the case having galvanized international scientists, politicians and human-rights groups who say the charges are baseless. The government-controlled Supreme Judicial Council can decide whether to affirm or annul the death penalty for the six defendants, who lost their appeal in Libya's Supreme Court on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | November 16, 2006
The federal judge hearing death-row inmate Vernon L. Evans Jr.'s challenge to Maryland's lethal-injection procedures said yesterday that he might direct state corrections officials to "test the recruitment waters" in search of doctors or highly trained nurses to participate in state executions before he rules on whether to require the medical professionals' involvement. U.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg said that nine days of trial testimony, stretched over three months, had left "a hole in the record" regarding the availability of doctors and nurses trained and willing to monitor an inmate's level of consciousness and to perform a surgical procedure to establish an IV in a major vein.
SPORTS
By McClatchey News Service | August 10, 1993
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Brad Holman will be going home today -- by land, not by air.Felled by a line drive to the face on Sunday in Texas, the Seattle Mariners rookie has a bruised sinus cavity -- not a broken one -- and could rejoin the team within two weeks.The only bad news yesterday, after a series of tests, was that for the next 10 to 14 days, Holman can't work out and can't fly. So today, when he is released from a hospital in Arlington, Texas, his wife will pick him up and drive them to their home in Wichita, Kan."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun Reporter | October 22, 2006
In North Carolina, a physician monitored a condemned inmate's brain waves as the drugs that would bring death were about to be added to the IV. The doctor was prepared to direct executioners to inject more anesthesia if the prisoner remained conscious. Doctors in Georgia have gradually taken on larger roles in state executions, starting intravenous lines when nurses could not and, on one occasion, even ordering a second dose of potassium chloride after a prisoner's heart did not stop. In Maryland, a team of correctional officers, prison officials and hired nursing assistants and paramedics carries out executions.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
Blair and Ahern warn parties to elect N. Ireland government ARMAGH, Northern Ireland -- The British and Irish prime ministers, Tony Blair and Bertie Ahern, issued an ultimatum yesterday to Northern Ireland's divided politicians: Elect a power-sharing administration by November - or your legislature will be disbanded. Their declaration followed 3 1/2 years of diplomacy that has failed to revive a Catholic-Protestant administration, the intended centerpiece of the Good Friday peace accord that the two prime ministers oversaw eight years ago. A previous coalition collapsed in October 2002 over an Irish Republican Army spying scandal.
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