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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
The economy has health insurers worried - fewer employed people means fewer members for the insurance plans. For those who provide health care, however, the impact of the economic slowdown is more indirect. "It's true that physicians and other health care providers are generally recession-proof," said T. Michael Preston, executive director of the state medical society, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland. However, "any downturn plays out over the longer term in the availability of insurance."
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NEWS
September 11, 2012
I was not surprised that die hard Democrat Mel Mintz is supporting the re-election of President Obama ("Romney is this year's Dewey," Sept. 5), but the reasons he gives for his support are amusing. He must be living in some other country. First, he correctly states that Osama bin Laden is dead and GM is doing well. The military and intelligence people found this terrorist and killed him. All this president did was give the OK. Any rational American would have done the same. General Motors is still alive today only because the taxpayer has given the company billions of dollars of borrowed money.
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BUSINESS
July 11, 1992
NationsBank said yesterday that it would try to control health-care costs with a new system of managed care that includes negotiating directly with doctors and hospitals for discounted rates in some areas.The plan will allow many of its 55,000 employees nationwide, including 3,400 in Baltimore, to choose either a health maintenance organization or a preferred-provider organization.Employees who choose the HMO would receive medical care for a flat monthly rate. Workers who join the PPO and go to doctors and hospitals on the NationsBank plan's list would receive 80 percent reimbursement.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | December 17, 2011
If you want to understand a major reason medical costs are out of control, breaking the federal budget and dividing the country, look at the types of people enrolled in XLHealth's Medicare insurance plans. Most suffer from diabetes, congestive heart failure or other long-term illness. They're like the millions of chronically ill Americans who visit doctors half a dozen times a year or more and, by some measures, account for 80 percent or more of all spending by the Medicare program for senior citizens.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Health maintenance organizations, which now serve 45 million Americans, proposed uniform federal standards yesterday for the operation and financing of health plans across the country.The HMOs, concerned about the possibility of 50 different sets of state regulations, would go much further than President Clinton's health care plan in trying to establish uniform national standards.Under Mr. Clinton's proposal, no health plan could do business unless it was first certified by one or more states.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
United Payors & United Providers Inc., the Rockville managed-care middleman, announced yesterday that it had agreed to be acquired by BCE Emergis of Montreal for $580 million cash, or $27 a share. The announcement pushed shares of UP&UP up $5.0625 to $25.5625, a jump of 19.8 percent. UP&UP has grown rapidly since it was founded in 1995 and went public in 1996 -- from less than a dozen employees to about 650 and from $35.2 million in revenue in 1996 to $108.7 million in 1999. The company offers a variety of services to health insurers and self-insured employers (the payers)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As part of its health-care plan, the Clinton administration is considering a proposal to dismantle the Medicaid program and integrate low-income people into the same networks of doctors, hospitals and private insurance companies that would serve more affluent people, administration officials say.But poor people would probably receive medical and social services beyond the standard package of health benefits to be guaranteed to all Americans, the...
NEWS
By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | February 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton will seek at least $35 billion in savings from Medicare over the next four years by limiting payments to doctors and hospitals and by trying to increase premiums for elderly people with high incomes, administration officials said yesterday.The proposed savings, three times what President George Bush sought unsuccessfully last year, are part of what Mr. Clinton describes as a bold program to reduce the deficit and its long-term burden on the U.S. economy. He will announce the outlines of that program in a speech to Congress on Wednesday, but the details may still be modified.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
I was not surprised that die hard Democrat Mel Mintz is supporting the re-election of President Obama ("Romney is this year's Dewey," Sept. 5), but the reasons he gives for his support are amusing. He must be living in some other country. First, he correctly states that Osama bin Laden is dead and GM is doing well. The military and intelligence people found this terrorist and killed him. All this president did was give the OK. Any rational American would have done the same. General Motors is still alive today only because the taxpayer has given the company billions of dollars of borrowed money.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1997
Principal Health Care of the Mid-Atlantic, a Bethesda-based HMO, said yesterday that it was selling its Washington-area business to Inova Health System, a Virginia-based network of hospitals, nursing homes and other health services.Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.About 14,000 members whose employers are in Montgomery and Prince George's counties, the District of Columbia and Virginia are expected to become Inova HMO subscribers after the deal is completed.Principal's 12,000 members who have employers in the rest of Maryland will remain with the company.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Tribune Washington Bureau | March 15, 2009
VERO BEACH, Fla. -With his stethoscope decorated with three tiny koalas, Dennis Saver looks every bit the family doctor as he steps into the examining room of his small practice on Florida's Treasure Coast. When Saver begins to examine his patient, however, he does something that four out of five doctors in America do not do: He pulls out a computer. The little black Toshiba, its edges worn to the bare metal, now gets more use than the stethoscope and has become key to the care Saver gives his patients.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun Reporter | March 2, 2008
For two decades, electronic health records have been the Next Big Thing in health care: a way to simultaneously improve care and reduce waste in a system clogged with paper and manila folders. In 1994, President Bill Clinton announced that all doctors would use computerized records within 10 years. In his 2004 State of the Union, President Bush called for universal use of digital health records. The result of all these grand declarations: 90 percent of U.S. doctors and more than two-thirds of U.S. hospitals still use paper for patient records.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun Reporter | January 27, 2008
By now you surely know the U.S. health care system is massively messed up. But the question is why. A few years ago, health journalist Shannon Brownlee was going through some global health statistics. She noticed that even as U.S. health care costs were rising steadily, Americans were not getting healthier. How to explain this apparent paradox? Brownlee became fascinated and began to collect data in search of answers. The result is Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sicker and Poorer, her analysis of how American health care has failed.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 2007
What if medical care came with a 90-day warranty? That is what a hospital group in central Pennsylvania is trying to learn in an experiment that some experts say is a radically new way to encourage hospitals and doctors to provide high-quality care that can avoid costly mistakes. The group, Geisinger Health System, has overhauled its approach to surgery. And taking a cue from the makers of television sets, washing machines and other consumer products, Geisinger essentially guarantees its workmanship, charging a flat fee that includes 90 days of follow-up treatment.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - In a victory for patients and their doctors, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that health maintenance organizations can be forced by state law to open their networks to outside doctors and hospitals. The decision upholds so-called "any willing provider" laws in half the states. These pro-consumer laws permit patients enrolled in an HMO to see a favorite doctor or specialist, even if the physician is not part of the network. So long as the medical provider abides by the network's rules, the HMO may not "discriminate against" the doctor or hospital.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
The economy has health insurers worried - fewer employed people means fewer members for the insurance plans. For those who provide health care, however, the impact of the economic slowdown is more indirect. "It's true that physicians and other health care providers are generally recession-proof," said T. Michael Preston, executive director of the state medical society, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland. However, "any downturn plays out over the longer term in the availability of insurance."
NEWS
By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | December 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- At a time when Medicare and private health insurers are struggling to control medical bills, many doctors and hospitals are increasing their income by improperly manipulating the numerical codes used to describe their services on insurance claims and billing forms, federal investigators say.Federal auditors say the techniques are often illegal and clearly violate the intent of federal rules concerning payment for doctors' services under Medicare.The...
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1996
After a successful shakedown cruise, the Johns Hopkins Health System is seeking higher visibility for a plan in which it offers managed-care services directly to self-insured employers -- skipping over insurance companies and health maintenance organizations.The program, called Employee Health Plans (EHP), makes Hopkins the only hospital in Maryland contracting directly with employers, although other hospitals and doctors' groups have assembled care networks to contract with managed-care insurers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg and Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
Doctors and hospitals scrambled yesterday to treat more than 2,000 burned, broken and crushed patients taken from the wreckage of the World Trade Center. Medical officials set up makeshift emergency rooms, appealed for volunteer staff and set up triage centers, including one at a New Jersey waterfront park where hundreds were ferried throughout the day. Meanwhile, patients injured when an airliner slammed into the Pentagon were taken by ambulance and helicopter to hospitals in Virginia and Washington.
NEWS
By Marian Morton and Marian Morton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2001
Jackie Mann looks healthy at age 57. She has a spark in her eye, color in her cheeks and a bounce in her step. Diagnosed with breast cancer a year ago, she has completed radiation treatments and succeeded for now in preventing the disease from spreading. But looking healthy has been part of the problem during her bout with cancer. Mann is deaf, and has struggled frequently to communicate with doctors, especially when her external appearance belies her internal pain. Although the Americans with Disabilities Act requires doctors to provide American Sign Language interpreters for their deaf patients, Mann and other deaf patients often have had to fight to have hospitals and clinics provide this basic service for them.
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