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By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | September 30, 1992
Why should doctors be any different? Like the general public, physicians have differing views on the issue of abortion:An obstetrician of 40 years' standing, who remembers seeing women die after back-alley abortions, says safe abortions are a service he's glad he can provide his patients.A medical resident assigned to learn how to perform second-trimester abortions says nightmares forced her to tell her supervisors she had to be reassigned.Dr. Ben Carson, a Johns Hopkins Hospital pediatric neurosurgeon, says that "as an individual who spends a lot of time trying to maintain life, I'm not going to be particularly enthusiastic about destroying life."
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 8, 2014
According to a new federal database put online last week, pharmaceutical companies and device makers paid doctors some $380 million in speaking and consulting fees over a five-month period in 2013. Some doctors received over $500,000 each, and some got millions of dollars in royalties from products they helped develop. Doctors claim these payments have no effect on what they prescribe. But why would drug companies shell out all of this money if it didn't provide them a healthy return on their investment?
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | March 5, 2013
Johns Hopkins will train China's next generation of doctors, researchers and hospital administrators under a new agreement with Sun Yat-sen University. The agreement was signed this week in the city of Guangzhou, where the university has affiliated hospitals, officials with Johns Hopkins Medicine International said. China's health system is growing rapidly and officials there hope Hopkins' expertise will help them develop a strong foundation for medical care.   Under the agreement, Hopkins researchers will teach courses at Sun Yat-sen.
NEWS
October 7, 2014
It actually doesn't do much good to head up an article about payments to doctors by telling readers that a doctor invented a great new device and the company sent him a check for royalties ( "Payments to doctors from drug companies, device makers revealed," Oct. 4). What would have been helpful is if your reporter had focused on whether the payments were justified instead of solely on the number of dollars. What's news is when device companies send kickbacks to doctors who didn't invent a device but merely used it rather than one from a competing company.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 8, 2012
Do you think your doctor is open and honest with you? Maybe not always, according to a new survey. Researchers from Harvard Medical School and the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston surveyed 1,891 physicians nationwide and one-tenth said they had told a patient something untruthful in the last year. Nearly 20 percent of physicians surveyed said they had not fully disclosed an error to a patient in the previous year because they feared a malpractice case.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 7, 2013
What if you're doctor smoked marijuana and then performed surgery on you? Not a comforting thought, but it could happen. That is why two Johns Hopkins doctors and patient safety experts say hospitals should make alcohol and drug tests mandatory for physicians. The doctors shared their views in a commentary published online April 29 in The Journal of the American Medical Association. They say doctors should also be tested if a patient dies suddenly or is unexpectedly injured during surgery.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 19, 2014
Patients who feel their doctors judge them about their size have a harder time losing weight, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. “Negative encounters can prompt a weight loss attempt, but our study shows they do not translate into success,” study leader Dr. Kimberly A. Gudzune, an assistant professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a statement. “Ideally, we need to talk about weight loss without making patients feel they are being judged.
NEWS
June 4, 2012
In response to Ritu Agarwal's commentary ("The high cost of waiting," June 1): While it can be frustrating to wait in a doctor's office, Ms. Argarwal fails to consider several important factors affecting the promptness of being seen at an appointed time. Doctors don't "run behind" just because they feel like it; falling behind schedule is stressful to the doctor and staff as well as the patient. There are legitimate reasons for falling behind schedule, including, but not limited to: true emergencies (a tooth knocked out on the playground)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 12, 2012
A Johns Hopkins bioethicist joined other government and health officials in calling on the U.S. Congress to do more to protect doctors in war zones such as Syria. In recent remarks to Congress, Leonard Rubenstein, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics specializing in protection of human rights in areas of conflict, said violations of medical neutrality must have consequences. “Adherence to norms won't take place unless it becomes a diplomatic priority, with the U.S. and other states using their considerable leverage to demand adherence to international law,” he said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
April 19, 2010
Nurse practitioners who educated legislators, negotiated with MedChi and reached out to all stakeholders were happy with the outcome of legislation to reduce the administrative burden of a physician collaborative agreement. The lengthy form and approval process was eliminated and will be replaced with a written statement by each nurse practitioner on file at the Board of Nursing. This highlights two things. First, public acceptance of the high quality, safe and cost effective care by nurse practitioners.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
NEWS
Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
An American doctor who was exposed to Ebola while volunteering to treat patients with the virus in Sierra Leone was admitted to the National Institute of Health in Bethesda on Sunday, the institute said. The patient will be treated at the NIH Clinical Center's Special Clinical Studies Unit, which is "specifically designed to provide high-level isolation capabilities" and staffed by experts on infectious diseases and critical care, according to an NIH release. "The unit staff is trained in strict infection control practices optimized to prevent spread of potentially transmissible agents such as Ebola," the institute said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi gave a talk last year to families about advanced prosthetics that would someday benefit their children who were missing hands. But when a parent asked what was easy, available and affordable now, Chi was at a loss. After focusing on the latest artificial limb technology, he began to hunt for more basic options. Like many researchers, entrepreneurs and even artists in recent years, he turned to the 3-D printer. With one his wife bought him for Father's Day, sheets of colored plastic, and free designs and advice found online, he made a hand for about $20. "One of the first kids we fitted was a 2-year-old," Chi said.
HEALTH
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A database in Kentucky that has tracked potentially dangerous and addictive prescriptions dispensed in the state for the past 15 years has become a national model by helping significantly reduce so-called doctor-shopping for pain drugs. Federal data show the state has dropped from the second-highest abuser of prescription drugs such as OxyContin and Percocet to 31st. But what it and other states cannot show is that such programs cut down on overdose deaths from all legal and illegal drugs, a lesson not lost on Maryland as its joins every other state in launching its own prescription drug monitoring system.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Former Catonsville doctor William Dando will not face trial for sexual assault allegations after agreeing never to practice medicine in Maryland again. Allegany County prosecutors dropped charges against him Tuesday, citing two factors — the "he said, she said" nature of the case and his decision to surrender his medical license. Dando had been scheduled to stand trial Wednesday in an incident in which a 41-year-old patient said he touched her genitals while treating her for an ear infection at an urgent-care center near Cumberland.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
I would like to share my organization's thoughts with regard to recent discussions about medical marijuana in Maryland and the question of whether physicians should receive additional training ( "Medical pot rules raise concern," July 26). As a statewide pharmacists' program with a mission to educate our field about drug and alcohol abuse, we are aware of the harmful effects substance use has especially when illicit drug and prescription drugs interact. Many clinicians outside of the pharmacy community lack the background necessary to discern the dangers recreational use of drugs can have on various health conditions due to prescription drug interplay.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
We physicians are not a trade union ("Got a better plan for reducing Medicare costs?" April 5). We have a monopoly on an essential service. As such, we are not permitted to unionize without violating antitrust laws. However, medical practice is voluntary. If pay does not cover costs, especially of massive student loan payback and practice startup costs, there will be less and less access to care. Marylanders should contact their legislators about real tort reform if they expect any reduction in their Medicare costs, as elderly patients and their families expect prompt diagnosis, timely treatment and excellent outcomes regardless of age or prior severe illness.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
I, for one, do not think that having doctors dispense drugs in their office is a bad practice ( "Lawmakers must address prescription drug loophole in workers' comp cases," April 14). Why is it that only the pharmaceuticals and CVS stores can make all of the money on grossly-inflated drug bills? Until state legislators decide to make sweeping changes across the board when it comes to the highly inflated cost, it is not fair going after the doctors. They claim that millions are being lost.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
NEWS
By Dwaine Rieves | August 8, 2014
He stood, dropped his pants and as one pocket crumpled, the other didn't. There it was: the creased outline of what appeared to be a pistol in the right hip pocket. I steeled and turned my attention to the specimen collection kit on the work shelf before me. The door was closed. We were alone in the exam room. This would be just fine, I told myself. To which another part of my brain responded - well, if it isn't, are you prepared? Ask me about my fears back when I first started volunteering to do sexually transmitted disease testing in a downtown Washington D.C. clinic for gay men, and my answer would involve an embarrassing lesson taught by a young patient in pumps and a halter top. Back then, not really knowing my patients - their backgrounds, social situations, lingo and interaction style - was pretty much my only fear.
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