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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
E.L. Doctorow, one of America's most celebrated writers, is scheduled to deliver a lecture at the Johns Hopkins University tonight on the topic of "Literature and Religion." Doctorow is the winner of the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award, among many other literary prizes. His novels, including Ragtime and Billy Bathgate, are often set in a richly evoked American past. His writing style is astonishingly diverse from one book to the next, so much so that it's sometimes hard to believe they were written by the same author.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 13, 2008
CHAUTAUQUA, N.Y. - I suppose a week's worth of lectures on writing might be considered a busman's holiday for someone like me, but when the lecturers are Billy Collins, E.L. Doctorow, Joyce Carol Oates, Amy Tan and Garry Trudeau, it's a bus you want to be on. To hear these masters in the "institutional sublimity" of Chautauqua is to be at least twice blessed. For me it was thrice. I hear all these stars and I begin, as I do every summer, thinking about how to start doing the things that really matter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
Sweet Land Stories, by E. L. Doctorow. Random House. 148 pages. $24.95. Although the five stories in E. L. Doctorow's new collection, Sweet Land Stories, are far more conventional in form than his prize-winning novels Ragtime, Billy Bathgate or World's Fair, the characters who animate them are anything but conventional. They are strangers in a strange and hostile land, the "sweet" of the title being a reflex of Doctorow's ingrained irony. While there is a measure of authentic sweetness in these stories, it is in the characters themselves, a touch of naivete and hopefulness that makes their failings and inevitable suffering all the more poignant.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | November 8, 2006
Listening to E.L. Doctorow is like listening to a scratchy, old LP, the needle traversing ever-narrowing circles. The voice over the telephone receiver is pitched low and is full of unexpected catches, of stops and starts - not unlike the experience of reading his novels and essays. The much-lauded, much-awarded author of such works as Ragtime, The Book of Daniel and The March will be in the area twice in the next few months. Tomorrow, he will appear at the Enoch Pratt Free Library before about 200 invited guests, where he will receive the library's Lifetime Literary Achievement award.
FEATURES
By ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR and ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2005
The March, E.L. Doctorow's fictional Civil War saga of Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's devastating scorched-earth campaign against the Confederate South, was chosen yesterday as a finalist for the National Book Award, along with Joan Didion's memoir of her grief following her husband's death, The Year of Magical Thinking. American poets W.S. Merwin and John Ashbery, both 78, were also finalists. Merwin was nominated for Migration and Ashbery for the collection Where Shall I Wander. Christopher Sorrentino's Trance, a novel based on the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst, was also a fiction finalist, along with Mary Gaitskill's Veronica, the stark story of a friendship between a young woman and an older, HIV-positive colleague.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 13, 2000
The first of E.L. Doctorow's ten novels, "Welcome to Hard Times," was published in 1960, when he was 29. His most successful book thus far, "Ragtime," was published in 1975. His ninth novel, "The Waterworks," came out in 1994. Now comes "City of God" (Random House, 272 pages, $25). The wait was worth it. It is an astonishing, irresistible book. At 69, at the height of his powers, Doctorow has fashioned a magically imaginative, unpredictable novel that is lushly rooted in moral philosophy and history.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | June 5, 1994
New York -- When E. L. Doctorow writes about the past, sometimes he uses his memory -- flawed though it may be. "I have a terrible memory," he told an interviewer once, though it served him well enough to write such evocative novels as "World's Fair" and "Billy Bathgate," both set in the 1930s in his native New York.Other times, it's images he uses. For instance, his rambling old house in New Rochelle, N.Y., got Mr. Doctorow thinking about the history of the place and then beginning a novel set in the early 1900s.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | October 29, 2006
Creationists: Selected Essays 1993-2006 E.L. Doctorow Random House / 192 pages / $24.95 In the U.K. the word "brilliant" has long been slang for pretty much anything fun, exciting, delicious, good, enjoyable - you name it, it's covered by the term. In America, the word brilliant is repetitively overused as well, although with a more hifalutin' clarity of objective: This writer is "brilliant," this artist is "brilliant." At least the British have it right - the appellation of brilliance has long since become pointless.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | November 8, 2006
Listening to E.L. Doctorow is like listening to a scratchy, old LP, the needle traversing ever-narrowing circles. The voice over the telephone receiver is pitched low and is full of unexpected catches, of stops and starts - not unlike the experience of reading his novels and essays. The much-lauded, much-awarded author of such works as Ragtime, The Book of Daniel and The March will be in the area twice in the next few months. Tomorrow, he will appear at the Enoch Pratt Free Library before about 200 invited guests, where he will receive the library's Lifetime Literary Achievement award.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 7, 1998
The last line of an article on the Tony Awards was inadvertently omitted in yesterday's Arts & Society section. The final paragraph should have read:Twenty years from now, when your neighborhood dinner theater, community theater or high school stages "Ragtime," it will still be a great musical. But when -- or if -- they stage "The Lion King," it will still be a cartoon.The Sun regrets the errors.NEW YORK - "The Lion King" vs. "Ragtime." Tonight's Tony Award competition for best musical boils down to a spirited race between two shows that, on the surface, have several things in common.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | October 29, 2006
Creationists: Selected Essays 1993-2006 E.L. Doctorow Random House / 192 pages / $24.95 In the U.K. the word "brilliant" has long been slang for pretty much anything fun, exciting, delicious, good, enjoyable - you name it, it's covered by the term. In America, the word brilliant is repetitively overused as well, although with a more hifalutin' clarity of objective: This writer is "brilliant," this artist is "brilliant." At least the British have it right - the appellation of brilliance has long since become pointless.
FEATURES
By ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR and ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2005
The March, E.L. Doctorow's fictional Civil War saga of Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's devastating scorched-earth campaign against the Confederate South, was chosen yesterday as a finalist for the National Book Award, along with Joan Didion's memoir of her grief following her husband's death, The Year of Magical Thinking. American poets W.S. Merwin and John Ashbery, both 78, were also finalists. Merwin was nominated for Migration and Ashbery for the collection Where Shall I Wander. Christopher Sorrentino's Trance, a novel based on the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst, was also a fiction finalist, along with Mary Gaitskill's Veronica, the stark story of a friendship between a young woman and an older, HIV-positive colleague.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | September 25, 2005
One by one, the season's new arrivals beckon, waving us over to the tables on which they lounge so seductively: Shalimar the Clown by Salman Rushdie gives us a come-hither look. The March by E.L. Doctorow whispers low and sweet in our ear. Zadie Smith's On Beauty provocatively flutters its pages. Slow Man by J.M. Coetzee flips open its cover and spreads out before us on its spine. It's so tempting to sample the merchandise. And who, really, does it hurt? So many great new books, so little money.
NEWS
By Mike Littwin and Mike Littwin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Review: Novel THE MARCH E.L. Doctorow Random House / 369 pages THE MOST COMPELLING CHARACTER that E.L. Doctorow creates in his Civil War novel, The March, is the march itself. We remember William Tecumseh Sherman's march to the sea from our high school history books as a morality play - but Doctorow is far too subtle a writer and thinker for that, of course. He gives us Sherman's march more as a force of nature that leaves nothing it touches unchanged and no one unmoved. It's not the fog of war that counts here.
NEWS
October 12, 2004
A vicious attack on the character of the president Although I have known for some time that The Sun shows biased support for liberal issues and liberal candidates, it reached a new low with E. L. Doctorow's column "The unfeeling president" (Opinion * Commentary, Oct. 6). This article is the most vile, hate-filled, mean-spirited, uncharitable and judgmental article I have ever read in any publication. I don't know how any decent and righteous person could approve of what Mr. Doctorow wrote in his article.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
Sweet Land Stories, by E. L. Doctorow. Random House. 148 pages. $24.95. Although the five stories in E. L. Doctorow's new collection, Sweet Land Stories, are far more conventional in form than his prize-winning novels Ragtime, Billy Bathgate or World's Fair, the characters who animate them are anything but conventional. They are strangers in a strange and hostile land, the "sweet" of the title being a reflex of Doctorow's ingrained irony. While there is a measure of authentic sweetness in these stories, it is in the characters themselves, a touch of naivete and hopefulness that makes their failings and inevitable suffering all the more poignant.
NEWS
By Mike Littwin and Mike Littwin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Review: Novel THE MARCH E.L. Doctorow Random House / 369 pages THE MOST COMPELLING CHARACTER that E.L. Doctorow creates in his Civil War novel, The March, is the march itself. We remember William Tecumseh Sherman's march to the sea from our high school history books as a morality play - but Doctorow is far too subtle a writer and thinker for that, of course. He gives us Sherman's march more as a force of nature that leaves nothing it touches unchanged and no one unmoved. It's not the fog of war that counts here.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 1, 1998
The musical "Ragtime" has been called a pageant and a tapestry, and it is both these things. But it is also something at once smaller and more grand.It is a show about family -- and all the struggles, joys, sacrifices, rewards and heartbreaks a family entails.Based on E.L. Doctorow's 1975 novel, this majestic, sweeping musical (book by Terrence McNally, score by Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens) is launching its tour at Washington's National Theatre.In the grand metaphorical sense, "Ragtime" is about the family that is America, a family that is often divisive, even dysfunctional, but ultimately an amalgam of the best qualities of its disparate members.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
E.L. Doctorow, one of America's most celebrated writers, is scheduled to deliver a lecture at the Johns Hopkins University tonight on the topic of "Literature and Religion." Doctorow is the winner of the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award, among many other literary prizes. His novels, including Ragtime and Billy Bathgate, are often set in a richly evoked American past. His writing style is astonishingly diverse from one book to the next, so much so that it's sometimes hard to believe they were written by the same author.
NEWS
January 23, 2003
An interview with Joanne Locke, member of Bookward Bound book club. How long have you been a part of Bookward Bound? I've been in well over a decade. ... The club has been in existence for - I'll bet it's at least 15 years. What's nice about it is we keep getting new people. Some people drop out, but it keeps on going like an Energizer bunny. [We have] roughly a dozen members. What are the demographics of your group? Mostly 50s and 60s. A couple of bureaucrats, some in the real estate business, one or two teachers, one retail person.
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