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NEWS
March 24, 1991
At its winter meeting on campus, the Hood College Board of Trustees granted tenure to two Carroll residents:* Kathleen Bands of Westminster, effective in the fall of 1992, an assistant professor of homeeconomics whose area of expertise is retailing. Bands, who came to Hood in 1984, earned bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of North Carolina and a doctorate from the University of Maryland.* Carolyn Knight of Uniontown, effective in January 1992, assistant professor of social work and chair of the department of sociology and social work.
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FEATURES
By Eric Meany, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
When Rose and Apollos Ihedigbo moved their young family to the United States from Nigeria in 1980, they were determined to pursue opportunities in higher education that had not been available to them in their native land. The road was not easy, but through persistence and hard work Rose and Apollos each earned doctoral degrees from the University of Massachusetts. Along the way they strove to teach their children the value of a good education as well as the harsh reality that not all those who desire to learn possess the resources to pay for schooling.
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NEWS
April 14, 2008
The Johns Hopkins University's impressive financial commitment to recruit more minority and female faculty members is a welcome recognition that higher education has to try just as hard to diversify faculty as it does to diversify the student body. But increasing the ranks of minority professors at any given campus can't be accomplished by simply recycling the existing pool. Recruitment efforts must also focus on making the academy more inviting as a career choice. Nationally, about 52,700 doctoral degrees were awarded in 2004-2005.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them - and encourages others to do so, as well. For two years, Kalirai, an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history. Now he is the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful. "Astronomy is my passion, and the James Webb Space Telescope is the most exciting astronomy project ever," said Kalirai, 35, of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1995
"My baby, that's my baby," sobbed Joyce Hill as her 24-year-old son, Anthony, and his classmates in the School of Business and Management stood to receive their bachelor's degrees yesterday from Morgan State University."We got here at 8 o'clock. I wanted to see every step," the Silver Spring woman said as she and her clan stood beneath the campus's perfumed locust trees.Commencement didn't start for another two hours. By then, it was standing room only at Hughes Stadium, where the university conferred about 740 bachelor's, 130 master's and five doctoral degrees.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1996
At ease and out of the arena, former President George Bush offered graduating students at the Johns Hopkins University relatively nonpartisan words of advice yesterday -- a life of success must include service to others.With a clipped, haikulike delivery, Bush exhorted Hopkins seniors: "Don't give up a chance to take a risk. Follow a vision. Hug a child. Touch a life."America's "neighbor-helping-neighbor spirit makes this country the kindest, and the gentlest, and the strongest country in the world," Bush said, reprising one of the slogans from his successful 1988 presidential campaign.
NEWS
May 28, 2006
The University of Mississippi graduated four African-American students with doctorates in math last weekend, setting a university record and dealing another blow to the institution's segregated past. This news was celebrated in academic circles, and rightly so. That such a small number was considered significant, however, illustrates the dearth of black students receiving doctorates in math and other sciences nationally. It also points to the need for continued recruitment and mentoring of black doctoral candidates by American universities.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 2, 1990
Of the 933 doctorates in mathematics awarded in the United States in the last academic year, only 43 percent went to U.S. citizens, the lowest percentage on record.A survey published last month by the American Mathematical Society said that from July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990, the number of doctoral degrees in mathematics increased by 3 percent over the preceding year, and by 15 percent over the average of the past four years. But only 401 of the recipients of degrees were U.S. citizens.In recent years, foreign students have wonincreasing shares of advanced U.S. degrees in engineering, mathematics and several sciences.
NEWS
By Martin Weil, The Washington Post | January 7, 2013
A professor of physics at the University of Maryland, College Park who specializes in fundamental questions of the structure and behavior of the universe has been named a recipient of the National Medal of Science. Sylvester James Gates Jr., 62, was among 12 researchers named by President Barack Obama on Dec. 21 to receive the award at a White House ceremony this year. The medal, created in 1959 and awarded each year, recognizes what the White House described as extraordinary knowledge and outstanding contributions in science and engineering.
NEWS
July 16, 2003
The Rev. Joseph Andrew Kaiser, who served several Roman Catholic parishes in the Baltimore area after many years of teaching, died of complications of Parkinson's disease Thursday at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. He was 82. The Philadelphia native joined the Christian Brothers order in 1939. He earned his undergraduate, master's and doctoral degrees - the last in sacred theology - from Catholic University of America. After teaching at his order's high schools in Washington and Philadelphia, he taught in and became chairman of the theology department at La Salle University.
NEWS
By Martin Weil, The Washington Post | January 7, 2013
A professor of physics at the University of Maryland, College Park who specializes in fundamental questions of the structure and behavior of the universe has been named a recipient of the National Medal of Science. Sylvester James Gates Jr., 62, was among 12 researchers named by President Barack Obama on Dec. 21 to receive the award at a White House ceremony this year. The medal, created in 1959 and awarded each year, recognizes what the White House described as extraordinary knowledge and outstanding contributions in science and engineering.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
Arguing that the two-party system is corrupt, a Montgomery County businessman is pouring his own money into an independent bid for the U.S. Senate from Maryland. Rob Sobhani, 52, who announced his candidacy this month, is the first candidate to buy television ads in the general election race for the seat now held by Sen. Ben Cardin, a Democrat. The spots have been aired heavily in Baltimore and Washington. "Our politics is broken," Sobhani, a political economist and energy entrepreneur from Potomac, says in one 30-second spot.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Dozens of doctoral programs at the University of Maryland, College Park and the Johns Hopkins University rank near the top in their respective fields, according to a long-awaited report released Tuesday by the National Research Council. College Park ranks 16th and Hopkins 23rd in the number of doctoral degrees awarded, according to the report, which covers more than 5,000 programs in 62 fields. The report, based on data collected from 212 universities during the 2006-2007 academic year, defies easy explanation.
NEWS
April 14, 2008
The Johns Hopkins University's impressive financial commitment to recruit more minority and female faculty members is a welcome recognition that higher education has to try just as hard to diversify faculty as it does to diversify the student body. But increasing the ranks of minority professors at any given campus can't be accomplished by simply recycling the existing pool. Recruitment efforts must also focus on making the academy more inviting as a career choice. Nationally, about 52,700 doctoral degrees were awarded in 2004-2005.
NEWS
May 28, 2006
The University of Mississippi graduated four African-American students with doctorates in math last weekend, setting a university record and dealing another blow to the institution's segregated past. This news was celebrated in academic circles, and rightly so. That such a small number was considered significant, however, illustrates the dearth of black students receiving doctorates in math and other sciences nationally. It also points to the need for continued recruitment and mentoring of black doctoral candidates by American universities.
NEWS
July 16, 2003
The Rev. Joseph Andrew Kaiser, who served several Roman Catholic parishes in the Baltimore area after many years of teaching, died of complications of Parkinson's disease Thursday at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. He was 82. The Philadelphia native joined the Christian Brothers order in 1939. He earned his undergraduate, master's and doctoral degrees - the last in sacred theology - from Catholic University of America. After teaching at his order's high schools in Washington and Philadelphia, he taught in and became chairman of the theology department at La Salle University.
NEWS
September 3, 2000
Western Maryland College welcomes 10 full-time and one half-time undergraduate and graduate faculty for the 2000-2001 academic year, according to Samuel Case, interim dean and provost of the college. The college also has hired one adjunct undergraduate faculty member, as well as a number of professors who will serve one-year appointments. New full-time members are: Lt. Col. Donald Craig, professor and chair of military science. The new leader of the Army ROTC Green Terror Battalion comes to WMC from Fort Leavenworth, Kan., where he was division chief for the Leader Development Division in the Center for Army Leadership.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
Sylvia Ingram doesn't much like to talk about herself.In fact, the associate professor of English and director of the office of affirmative action at Anne Arundel Community College can't quite figure out why she's become a celebrity."
NEWS
September 3, 2000
Western Maryland College welcomes 10 full-time and one half-time undergraduate and graduate faculty for the 2000-2001 academic year, according to Samuel Case, interim dean and provost of the college. The college also has hired one adjunct undergraduate faculty member, as well as a number of professors who will serve one-year appointments. New full-time members are: Lt. Col. Donald Craig, professor and chair of military science. The new leader of the Army ROTC Green Terror Battalion comes to WMC from Fort Leavenworth, Kan., where he was division chief for the Leader Development Division in the Center for Army Leadership.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 13, 2000
The situation is tense, time critical. Hundreds of lives hang in the balance. A highly trained specialist is called to the scene to examine the rotting flesh using sophisticated diagnostic tools such as DNA probes and serological testing. He bends to the patient: a green, leafy little guy with a bad case of mites. Just another day on the job for a D.P.M. -- doctor of plant medicine. Yes, those with dreams of becoming a doctor will soon have a new breed of patients upon which to practice: vegetables.
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