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NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
Harford County's newest doctor is on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, but there are some things you need to understand before seeking his services.First, he doesn't make house calls. Second, he doesn't accept payment from insurance companies. Third, he doesn't treat humans or animals.He works with cowhide, rawhide, sometimes kangaroo, and a little salve. He's the Glove Doctor and his name is Al Neville.For fees ranging from $5 to $40, the former owner of the Bel Air Sporting Goods Store will repair and recondition old baseball gloves.
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NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
To the nurse at my doctor's office who completely disregarded my instructions and sang out my weight for all to hear: Thank you. Like many women, I was living in fear of The Number. After bearing two children in three years, I stopped weighing myself. My body, too long a host vehicle, felt like it belonged to somebody else. The time it would take to exercise and rein it in now was easily consumed by other demands. I embraced the dictum of an old friend (and of certain women's magazines)
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FEATURES
By Susan Ferraro and Susan Ferraro,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | November 8, 1998
In the memoir "Boy," Roald Dahl wrote of how, when he was very small, his tonsils were pinched out, in the doctor's office, without benefit of any anesthetic.And this reporter's own mother never forgot the horrifying pain she endured in childhood when a doctor lanced her middle ear without anesthetic.Pain hurts more when you are small, doctors say. Trauma triggered by the sting of a needle or a cut being sewn up without anesthetic can make kids distrustful of both parents and doctors, and even set up a lifelong aversion to medical procedures.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | January 15, 2000
THE HEALTH maintenance organization and its beige-carpeted waiting rooms of today are far removed from the Victorian corridors and high-ceilinged chambers of the physicians I knew in the Baltimore of 40 years ago. There are times when I have trouble recalling what ailed me, but I can picture those magnificent homes the 1880s and '90s-era aristocrats and merchant princes of Baltimore abandoned in the 1920s for the garden suburbs and horse country....
NEWS
July 12, 1996
IF THERE IS ONE thing policemen hate, it's an attitude. The display of a little deference can make all the difference between a hefty ticket and being sent on your way with the admonition to slow down from now on. In the case of David R. Lemmon, the Baltimore City firefighter arrested for speeding Mondaywhile trying to get his sick baby to the doctor, attitude accounts for why he ended up in handcuffs -- despite circumstances that cried out for leniency.This...
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
Prosecutors have dropped the most serious charges against a Reisterstown man who did not stop for police while rushing his sick infant daughter to the doctor Monday.That means David R. Lemmon won't face jail time, though he might have to pay a fine.Baltimore County Deputy State's Attorney Howard B. Merker yesterday said his office reviewed the police record and decided not to prosecute Lemmon on the two counts of fleeing and eluding arrest -- each of which carries a maximum one-year jail sentence -- or on the charge of resisting arrest.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | August 19, 1993
THE U.S. health situation has been studied and restudied. Every part of it has been analyzed under a microscope. But the one area being ignored under Hillary Clinton's plan is how long you will have to wait to see a doctor.Milton Ramrod, M.D., is the first to study the effects of waiting for a doctor on a person's health."Our studies indicate that the longer you wait for a doctor, the sicker you feel. To prove this, we conducted an experiment. We filled the outer office with patients. Then we called the name of one and he entered the doctor's office with a jaunty, light step."
NEWS
By Russell Baker | June 30, 1993
LIKE everybody else in America, I want the right to choose my own doctor. What I'd like from the government, however, is some good advice on how to do it.When I was fresh out of school it was easy. Having attended college with several people who went on to medical school, I simply phoned one or two and asked them which doctors to take my troubles to and which ones to avoid. Being young, therefore gossipy and indifferent to the discipline of the medical lodge, they told me.Life separated us. After 10 years practicing in the Texas Panhandle and points west, old school pals were no longer much help when you had to choose a doctor in New York.
NEWS
August 2, 1995
Someone pried open a desk drawer in a Severna Park doctor's office Saturday afternoon and stole $100 and nearly $800 worth of checks, county police said.Cindy Kelly Smith, 33, who manages Dr. Faith Hackett's office in the 800 block of Ritchie Highway, reported the theft when she came to work about 8:45 a.m. Monday. Ms. Smith found that someone had used a reflex hammer to pry open her desk and steal an envelope containing the money and $777 worth of patients' checks, police said.Officer Sharon Lynne McAllister investigated the theft and learned that police responded to an alarm at the office about 2:45 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
When David R. Lemmon discovered yesterday morning that his infant daughter's temperature had skyrocketed to 104.7 overnight, his instinct was to rush her to the nearby pediatrician's office in Reisterstown.Minutes later, Lemmon was being led from the office -- in $H handcuffs -- for failing to stop when a Baltimore County police officer tried to flag him down for allegedly speeding and running a stop sign."She was vomiting and choking on it, and all I was thinking was that I had to get her to the doctor," Lemmon, a 15-year city firefighter, said last night.
FEATURES
By Susan Ferraro and Susan Ferraro,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | November 8, 1998
In the memoir "Boy," Roald Dahl wrote of how, when he was very small, his tonsils were pinched out, in the doctor's office, without benefit of any anesthetic.And this reporter's own mother never forgot the horrifying pain she endured in childhood when a doctor lanced her middle ear without anesthetic.Pain hurts more when you are small, doctors say. Trauma triggered by the sting of a needle or a cut being sewn up without anesthetic can make kids distrustful of both parents and doctors, and even set up a lifelong aversion to medical procedures.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 14, 1998
BOSTON -- Start with the basic scenario. You are sitting in the doctor's office, dressed in one of those charming johnnies that open ever so attractively at the back.The doctor has probed various parts of your body and history that are not generally open to public scrutiny. The doctor now knows your age and weight (well, more or less), your blood pressure, your medications, your symptoms past and present, your reproductive history and any drugs that have been prescribed.HIV statusFor that matter he or she may know what genetic tests you've had and what your HIV status is, whether you've taken Prozac and if that's your original nose.
NEWS
July 12, 1996
IF THERE IS ONE thing policemen hate, it's an attitude. The display of a little deference can make all the difference between a hefty ticket and being sent on your way with the admonition to slow down from now on. In the case of David R. Lemmon, the Baltimore City firefighter arrested for speeding Mondaywhile trying to get his sick baby to the doctor, attitude accounts for why he ended up in handcuffs -- despite circumstances that cried out for leniency.This...
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
Prosecutors have dropped the most serious charges against a Reisterstown man who did not stop for police while rushing his sick infant daughter to the doctor Monday.That means David R. Lemmon won't face jail time, though he might have to pay a fine.Baltimore County Deputy State's Attorney Howard B. Merker yesterday said his office reviewed the police record and decided not to prosecute Lemmon on the two counts of fleeing and eluding arrest -- each of which carries a maximum one-year jail sentence -- or on the charge of resisting arrest.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
When David R. Lemmon discovered yesterday morning that his infant daughter's temperature had skyrocketed to 104.7 overnight, his instinct was to rush her to the nearby pediatrician's office in Reisterstown.Minutes later, Lemmon was being led from the office -- in $H handcuffs -- for failing to stop when a Baltimore County police officer tried to flag him down for allegedly speeding and running a stop sign."She was vomiting and choking on it, and all I was thinking was that I had to get her to the doctor," Lemmon, a 15-year city firefighter, said last night.
NEWS
August 2, 1995
Someone pried open a desk drawer in a Severna Park doctor's office Saturday afternoon and stole $100 and nearly $800 worth of checks, county police said.Cindy Kelly Smith, 33, who manages Dr. Faith Hackett's office in the 800 block of Ritchie Highway, reported the theft when she came to work about 8:45 a.m. Monday. Ms. Smith found that someone had used a reflex hammer to pry open her desk and steal an envelope containing the money and $777 worth of patients' checks, police said.Officer Sharon Lynne McAllister investigated the theft and learned that police responded to an alarm at the office about 2:45 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
To the nurse at my doctor's office who completely disregarded my instructions and sang out my weight for all to hear: Thank you. Like many women, I was living in fear of The Number. After bearing two children in three years, I stopped weighing myself. My body, too long a host vehicle, felt like it belonged to somebody else. The time it would take to exercise and rein it in now was easily consumed by other demands. I embraced the dictum of an old friend (and of certain women's magazines)
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | August 9, 1992
ATLANTA -- If you're going to eastern North Carolina or the Outer Banks this summer, Susan S. Rogers of Rome, Ga., suggests a stop at Bailey, N.C., where you can see something unusual: a museum devoted to country doctors.Most museums focus on art or natural history. But not the Country Doctor Museum of Bailey, a crossroads 35 miles southeast of Raleigh. At first glance, it looks like a quaint little Victorian home. At the end of the walkway a carriage lamp holds the familiar sign of the country doctor, a horse and buggy.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1994
Crouched inside the child-sized "doctor's office" at theCloisters Children's Museum yesterday, Pikesville resident Ann Muhvich appeared to be the perfect patient for her daughters Emma, 21 months, and Katie, nearly 5.But after dressing the budding physicians in miniature doctor's smocks, and scrunching down on the tiny patient's couch for an examination, she turned out to have a complaint for which there is no cure.Ms. Muhvich was unhappy about the museum's recent decision to close the castle-shaped building permanently on Labor Day so its staff can devote its attention to planning a larger museum near the Inner Harbor by late 1996.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | August 19, 1993
THE U.S. health situation has been studied and restudied. Every part of it has been analyzed under a microscope. But the one area being ignored under Hillary Clinton's plan is how long you will have to wait to see a doctor.Milton Ramrod, M.D., is the first to study the effects of waiting for a doctor on a person's health."Our studies indicate that the longer you wait for a doctor, the sicker you feel. To prove this, we conducted an experiment. We filled the outer office with patients. Then we called the name of one and he entered the doctor's office with a jaunty, light step."
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