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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
Confronting one of psychiatry's most wrenching problems, Maryland's medical disciplinary board has suspended the license of an esteemed psychiatrist who admitted to having a sexual affair with a patient suffering from depression and multiple personality disorder.Dr. John Hamilton, now forbidden to treat patients for at least a year, is the deputy medical director for the American Psychiatric Association who is credited with co-authoring an APA manual that set national standards for patient care.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
After a surgical scandal involving a cardiologist brought St. Joseph Medical Center to its knees, the medical staff left behind struggled to move forward. Patients and doctors fled in droves after the scandal broke in 2009. Negative headlines beat at their morale. And many remaining employees believed the distant owner of the once-well-regarded community hospital in Towson was unresponsive, leaving them feeling abandoned. "It was difficult to face the reality that someone I trusted very much had failed us," said Dr. Gail Cunningham, a 23-year veteran who headed the emergency department and is now vice president of medical affairs.
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NEWS
July 17, 2012
James Burdick sanctimoniously dismisses the legitimate concerns of opponents of the Affordable Care Act and universal care as "dogmatic bluster" ("Universal care on the horizon," July 13). He then goes on to sugarcoat the rationing of health care, stating that "cutting overutilization is a major goal" and that "quality is precisely the clinically correct test or treatment chosen by the doctor and patient together - no more, no less. " That's what we already have under the current system.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Doctors and patients alike are often uncomfortable talking about sexual health and sexually transmitted disease. But a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows that this squeamishness costs society millions of dollars spent trying to treat or cure diseases that could have been prevented, vaccinated against, screened for or detected at an earlier stage of development. According to the CDC, about 19 million Americans each year are affected by sexually transmitted diseases and infections.
NEWS
By Jan Winburn and Jan Winburn,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
'Intimate Death,' by Marie de Hennezel. Knopf. 224 pages. $22.It took 19 years of grieving to discover for myself what the author Marie de Hennezel coneys in just 224 pages: that in the death of a loved one, there is a gift for the living.Anyone who has watched someone die - or answered the phone in the black of night, knowing no good news arrives at that hour - will find a balm in the book 'Intimate Death.' As its author says, there is no place in our society for people who weep over the loss of someone they love.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 11, 1999
The right to die is an emotionally charged issue loaded with potential drama, as playwright Brian Clark proved two decades ago in "Whose Life Is It Anyway?"Yet David Rabe's "A Question of Mercy," which is receiving its area premiere at Olney Theatre Center, gets so bogged down in speechifying that at times it is more clinical than compelling.Based on an article by Richard Selzer that appeared in the New York Times Magazine in 1991, the play concerns a retired physician and an AIDS patient, who hopes the doctor will help him commit suicide.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 25, 1991
According to the Centers for Disease Control, approximately 6,782 doctors, dentists and other health care workers have AIDS. More than 50,000 others are thought to be infected with the virus that causes AIDS.New federal guidelines say certain health care workers should voluntarily be tested for the AIDS virus and should voluntarily stop certain procedures and tell their patients if they find they have the virus.But, as a recent article in the New York Times states, "Many who are infected have decided not to follow the new federal guidelines."
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Blacks have higher rates of obesity than whites, but doctors of black patients are less likely to counsel them on how to lose weight, according to a recent study from Johns Hopkins researchers that raises thorny questions about racial stereotypes and the stigma of obesity. The findings troubled researchers who set out to tackle what role race played in weight-loss counseling. Coaching patients to eat better and exercise can help fight obesity, but too often primary-care doctors don't have the time or don't make the effort to do so, said Sara Bleich, assistant professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
NEWS
By Barbara Samson Mills | August 7, 1995
EQUAL PARTNERS. By Jody Heymann, M.D. Little, Brown and Co. 257 pages. $22.95.DR. HEYMANN is a 29-year-old, right-handed woman who was in excellent health until one week ago about midnight she had a major motor seizure. . . . A MRI [magnetic resonance imaging test] shows a discrete circular lesion a little over 1 cm in diameter in the superior temporal gyrus on the right side. There is a question of a little blood in that area. This may be a small angiomatous malformation or perhaps a small tumor which has bled.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1995
State officials are building an extensive computer bank of Marylanders' medical records, alarming doctors and civil libertarians who fear it threatens the privacy of patients.Information on a patient's visits to doctors and other health professionals -- whether for a cold, treatment of AIDS or a mental illness -- is being fed into the computer system.Hundreds of thousands of patient records already have been collected this year without patients' knowledge. Experts say Maryland is on the way to having the nation's biggest computerized health profile of patients and doctors.
NEWS
July 17, 2012
James Burdick sanctimoniously dismisses the legitimate concerns of opponents of the Affordable Care Act and universal care as "dogmatic bluster" ("Universal care on the horizon," July 13). He then goes on to sugarcoat the rationing of health care, stating that "cutting overutilization is a major goal" and that "quality is precisely the clinically correct test or treatment chosen by the doctor and patient together - no more, no less. " That's what we already have under the current system.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Blacks have higher rates of obesity than whites, but doctors of black patients are less likely to counsel them on how to lose weight, according to a recent study from Johns Hopkins researchers that raises thorny questions about racial stereotypes and the stigma of obesity. The findings troubled researchers who set out to tackle what role race played in weight-loss counseling. Coaching patients to eat better and exercise can help fight obesity, but too often primary-care doctors don't have the time or don't make the effort to do so, said Sara Bleich, assistant professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
NEWS
By Adam J. Schiavi | September 29, 2010
I am thinking about the events that occurred at the Johns Hopkins Hospital on Sept. 16. Apparently, a surgeon was providing an update to one of his patients about her condition; her son heard the conversation, pulled a semi-automatic handgun out of his pants and shot the surgeon on the spot, right there in one of the most famous hospitals in the world. All this because the shooter was apparently unhappy with the medical care provided for his mother. He then proceeded to use that gun to kill the patient and then himself, in the process terrorizing the hospital, its patients and visitors for the better part of a day. I interact with our health care system as a doctor at this hospital, as well as being a potential patient and visitor, and I am left with an uneasy feeling about what this means for our society.
NEWS
By Heather R. Mizeur | September 22, 2009
Almost any doctor will readily offer up horror stories of trying to find and pay for medical malpractice insurance. Such policies are cost-prohibitive and increasingly scarce, and require many to practice "defensive medicine" - ordering extra precautionary tests and procedures that contribute mightily to the rise in health costs. A growing number of policymakers are calling for a cap on medical malpractice awards as a partial solution to the national health care debate. Rooting out frivolous lawsuits is a laudable goal, but limiting damage awards for patients who have been wronged is akin to fixing a broken leg with a band-aid.
NEWS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2007
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Christelle-Melenchy Fortius' first chance at a reasonably normal life ended badly, with the surgery on her mouth aborted before it began and a Haitian doctor apologizing that the anesthesia didn't work. Her father, Dieumaitre Fortius, said he tried to earn money to pay for another doctor but never got far, and some days he couldn't even afford food. Last month, Christelle's second chance came unexpectedly, from the United States. The USNS Comfort, a Navy hospital ship, appeared one morning in Port-au-Prince harbor, and three days later 4-year-old Christelle was asleep on an operating table inside, with an oral surgeon and a plastic surgeon taking turns making the tiny cuts and stitches to repair her double cleft lip. "That ship was like a benediction for me," Fortius said.
NEWS
By Dennnis O'Brien and Dennnis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | August 5, 2007
When a study published this spring showed that Avandia, a drug that lowers diabetics' blood sugar, also increased their risk of heart complications, Dr. Mary M. Newman, a Lutherville internist, was in a quandary about what to advise her patients taking the medication. "It was easy for patients to feel the drug was proven to be dangerous and everyone was concerned," Newman said. "But the thing is, there were benefits." In the end, she said, the decision on whether to continue the medication varied with each patient.
NEWS
September 2, 1993
Doctor and patient must work togetherRe Sara Engram's column, "The Persistent 'Dr. Death' " (Aug. 22), she posits that "too many physicians overlook the crucial details that can make life bearable for suffering people."What Ms. Engram overlooks is the stark reality that "suffering" is not always "bearable."Also, that indeed there might be a place in the physician's armamentarium for assisted suicide. This is not to suggest support for Dr. Kevorkian, who simply consults and then uses carbon monoxide, not a "medicine."
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
Family members wheeled the 76-year-old woman into Dr. Roger Kurlan's office, and it wasn't long before he recognized that she was going through a terrible time in her life. She told the Rochester, N.Y., neurologist that she had recently lost her husband and was still grieving the day she stumbled down her basement steps, broke her right arm and bruised her leg. She never fully recovered. Three months later, she had a tremor in her hand and jaw. On the rare occasions when she tried to walk, she could manage only a slow shuffle.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
Family members wheeled the 76-year-old woman into Dr. Roger Kurlan's office, and it wasn't long before he recognized that she was going through a terrible time in her life. She told the Rochester, N.Y., neurologist that she had recently lost her husband and was still grieving the day she stumbled down her basement steps, broke her right arm and bruised her leg. She never fully recovered. Three months later, she had a tremor in her hand and jaw. On the rare occasions when she tried to walk, she could manage only a slow shuffle.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2004
At age 70, Charles Slechta loves dancing with his wife, Viola. And thanks to a new kind of back surgery, the Pikesville resident is again able to do the jitterbug and the polka. Slechta and more than 40 other area residents have taken part in a Food and Drug Administration clinical trial testing a surgical procedure designed to relieve chronic back and leg pain without the need for a spinal fusion. With as many as 400,000 Americans a year undergoing spinal fusion surgery, the potential benefit of this relatively new technique, called Dynesys, is significant.
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