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SPORTS
February 10, 1992
Every day of sobriety is a victory for Mary Docter, but the U.S. speed skater says the attention given her fight against drug and alcohol addiction contributed to a losing effort yesterday.Docter, who entered a rehabilitation center in March 1990, was hoping for a top 10 finish in the women's 3,000 meters. But she wound up a disappointing 15th."I wasn't concentrating on my race last night. I was thinking about how I was going to deal with the questions I get from the press," Docter said. "That's my own fault and that's why I really regret telling my story in the first place.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Everything about Up is an up, in the most visceral and poetic ways. Pete Docter's new Pixar animated feature is even fresher, more inventive and inspired than his previous one, Monsters, Inc. Up takes its title from the defining act of a rickety widower, Carl Fredricksen (the voice of Edward Asner), who attaches thousands of helium balloons to his house and sails it to South America. He hopes to complete a promise he made to his wife, Ellie: traveling to Paradise Falls, trailblazed by their childhood hero, Charles Muntz (Christopher Plummer)
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SPORTS
By John Jeansonne and John Jeansonne,Newsday | February 10, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- To hear Mary Docter tell it, the supermarket tabloids have struck again.Here she was competing in her fourth Winter Olympics, two days shy of her 31st birthday, and the only thing on her mind was a story she just read in The Star. About her. About her struggle to recover from alcohol and drug addiction. "I wasn't concentrating on how I was going to skate," she said. "I was concentrating on how I was going to answer all the questions."The first question, actually, was how she felt about finishing 15th in the women's 3,000 meters speed skating yesterday.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | May 24, 2009
The legend goes that when Walt Disney looked for a distributor for his Mickey Mouse cartoons, mogul Louis B. Mayer reacted with horror at the amiable rodent. How could you turn a mouse into a comic hero? Pregnant housewives would stare at the creature on the screen and miscarry right in the theater, Mayer predicted. Of course, Mickey eventually became the mascot and mainstay of Disney's own studio. So it's poetic justice that the art of upsetting conventional wisdom with original ideas has fallen to Disney's heir, John Lasseter, the creative chief of Pixar and the head of Disney animation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 4, 2001
Picture this: Billy Crystal as the leprechaunish Cyclops, Mike, in Monsters, Inc. pitches the woo to a taller, serpentine Cyclops named Celia (Jennifer Tilly), who boasts a Medusa's head of snake-hair. Suddenly he notices a pile of stone statues. As the snakes on Celia's head snap, he asks her what the statues are. Without missing a beat or thinking it will make him nervous, Celia answers, "My old boyfriends." It's a hilarious throwaway. But you'll have to picture it in your imagination, because you'll never see it on the screen.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | May 2, 1991
A Howard County-based military contractor that shut down its operations last week and laid off hundreds of people nationwide has filed for bankruptcy court protection while it negotiates to sell the business.Daedalean Inc. abruptly closed its doors and sent its workers home unpaid on Friday. The company, which has been threatened with a loss of all its government business because of the tax-evasion convictions of its chief officers, filed Tuesday for protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Act.The company had been negotiating with several prospective buyers but made the filing after Maryland National Bank called in a $3.6 million loan, according Daedalean's bankruptcy lawyer, Charles Docter, of Docter and Docter in Washington.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | May 19, 1991
Daedalean Inc., which laid off all of its employees last month afterbeing threatened with a cutoff of federal contracts, received letters of intent Friday from two companies interested in buying the company's defense contracts and hiring its employees, its bankruptcy attorney said Friday."
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | May 7, 1991
A Howard County military contractor that abruptly closed its doors and laid off hundreds of workers two weeks ago has resumed limited operations but is negotiating to sell the business.Daedalean Inc. sent its workers home -- without pay -- on April 26. The company, which has been threatened with a loss of all of its government business because of the tax-evasion convictions of its chief officers, filed a week ago for protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Act.About 100 of the 266 workers laid off nationwide last month were recalled and back at work yesterday, said Missy Hall, a spokeswoman for the company.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | May 5, 1991
Some employees of Woodbine-based Daedalean Inc. may be called back to work tomorrow, a week after the defense contractor ran out of moneyand laid off its entire work force of 266, including about 100 in Howard County, its bankruptcy attorney said."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
A Virginia electronics firm has agreed to buy troubled defense contractor Daedalean Inc. and will likely hire the company's remaining 151employees.Eastern Computer Inc., based in Virginia Beach, has agreed to pay $4.3 million for four of five facilities run by Daedalean, which develops and manufactures training simulators for military equipment and tanks.Daedalean, based in Columbia, has operated under bankruptcy courtsupervision since May.The company's problems escalated followingadmissions of tax evasion by company owners in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 4, 2001
Picture this: Billy Crystal as the leprechaunish Cyclops, Mike, in Monsters, Inc. pitches the woo to a taller, serpentine Cyclops named Celia (Jennifer Tilly), who boasts a Medusa's head of snake-hair. Suddenly he notices a pile of stone statues. As the snakes on Celia's head snap, he asks her what the statues are. Without missing a beat or thinking it will make him nervous, Celia answers, "My old boyfriends." It's a hilarious throwaway. But you'll have to picture it in your imagination, because you'll never see it on the screen.
SPORTS
February 10, 1992
Every day of sobriety is a victory for Mary Docter, but the U.S. speed skater says the attention given her fight against drug and alcohol addiction contributed to a losing effort yesterday.Docter, who entered a rehabilitation center in March 1990, was hoping for a top 10 finish in the women's 3,000 meters. But she wound up a disappointing 15th."I wasn't concentrating on my race last night. I was thinking about how I was going to deal with the questions I get from the press," Docter said. "That's my own fault and that's why I really regret telling my story in the first place.
SPORTS
By John Jeansonne and John Jeansonne,Newsday | February 10, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- To hear Mary Docter tell it, the supermarket tabloids have struck again.Here she was competing in her fourth Winter Olympics, two days shy of her 31st birthday, and the only thing on her mind was a story she just read in The Star. About her. About her struggle to recover from alcohol and drug addiction. "I wasn't concentrating on how I was going to skate," she said. "I was concentrating on how I was going to answer all the questions."The first question, actually, was how she felt about finishing 15th in the women's 3,000 meters speed skating yesterday.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
A Virginia electronics firm has agreed to buy troubled defense contractor Daedalean Inc. and will likely hire the company's remaining 151employees.Eastern Computer Inc., based in Virginia Beach, has agreed to pay $4.3 million for four of five facilities run by Daedalean, which develops and manufactures training simulators for military equipment and tanks.Daedalean, based in Columbia, has operated under bankruptcy courtsupervision since May.The company's problems escalated followingadmissions of tax evasion by company owners in December.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | May 19, 1991
Daedalean Inc., which laid off all of its employees last month afterbeing threatened with a cutoff of federal contracts, received letters of intent Friday from two companies interested in buying the company's defense contracts and hiring its employees, its bankruptcy attorney said Friday."
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | May 7, 1991
A Howard County military contractor that abruptly closed its doors and laid off hundreds of workers two weeks ago has resumed limited operations but is negotiating to sell the business.Daedalean Inc. sent its workers home -- without pay -- on April 26. The company, which has been threatened with a loss of all of its government business because of the tax-evasion convictions of its chief officers, filed a week ago for protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Act.About 100 of the 266 workers laid off nationwide last month were recalled and back at work yesterday, said Missy Hall, a spokeswoman for the company.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Everything about Up is an up, in the most visceral and poetic ways. Pete Docter's new Pixar animated feature is even fresher, more inventive and inspired than his previous one, Monsters, Inc. Up takes its title from the defining act of a rickety widower, Carl Fredricksen (the voice of Edward Asner), who attaches thousands of helium balloons to his house and sails it to South America. He hopes to complete a promise he made to his wife, Ellie: traveling to Paradise Falls, trailblazed by their childhood hero, Charles Muntz (Christopher Plummer)
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | May 24, 2009
The legend goes that when Walt Disney looked for a distributor for his Mickey Mouse cartoons, mogul Louis B. Mayer reacted with horror at the amiable rodent. How could you turn a mouse into a comic hero? Pregnant housewives would stare at the creature on the screen and miscarry right in the theater, Mayer predicted. Of course, Mickey eventually became the mascot and mainstay of Disney's own studio. So it's poetic justice that the art of upsetting conventional wisdom with original ideas has fallen to Disney's heir, John Lasseter, the creative chief of Pixar and the head of Disney animation.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | May 5, 1991
Some employees of Woodbine-based Daedalean Inc. may be called back to work tomorrow, a week after the defense contractor ran out of moneyand laid off its entire work force of 266, including about 100 in Howard County, its bankruptcy attorney said."
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | May 2, 1991
A Howard County-based military contractor that shut down its operations last week and laid off hundreds of people nationwide has filed for bankruptcy court protection while it negotiates to sell the business.Daedalean Inc. abruptly closed its doors and sent its workers home unpaid on Friday. The company, which has been threatened with a loss of all its government business because of the tax-evasion convictions of its chief officers, filed Tuesday for protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Act.The company had been negotiating with several prospective buyers but made the filing after Maryland National Bank called in a $3.6 million loan, according Daedalean's bankruptcy lawyer, Charles Docter, of Docter and Docter in Washington.
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