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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The union representing 14,500 East Coast and Gulf longshoremen and the representative of 43 port operators and shipping companies completed negotiations on a six-year deal, a federal mediator announced Wednesday afternoon. The terms of the Master Agreement will now go to the respective memberships of the International Longshoremen's Association and U.S. Maritime Alliance for ratification, said George Cohen, director of Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The Port of Baltimore has about 1,200 dockworkers represented by four locals.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
The crash of a 477-foot tanker into a coal pier in Baltimore in 2012 — which cost millions of dollars in damages and injured a dockworker — was likely caused by the "high rate of speed" at which operators tried to maneuver the ship into Curtis Creek, the National Transportation Safety Board said in its final report on the incident, released Friday. The findings could have implications in pending litigation, though the majority of the damages — those claimed by CSX Transportation, the Jacksonville, Fla.-based railroad that owns the pier — have been settled out of court.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | November 30, 1990
Barry Ruskin, a longshoreman for three years, nearly smiled early this morning when he learned that dockworkers had reached a tentative agreement with the management of the Port of Baltimore.When told at the dispatch center of the International Longshoremen's Association today that post-midnight bargaining sessions had produced a contract for ILA members to vote on Monday for ratification, Ruskin remained composed."The happiness is being saved for when the word 'tentative' comes out of all of the contract talk.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The union representing 14,500 East Coast and Gulf longshoremen and the representative of 43 port operators and shipping companies completed negotiations on a six-year deal, a federal mediator announced Wednesday afternoon. The terms of the Master Agreement will now go to the respective memberships of the International Longshoremen's Association and U.S. Maritime Alliance for ratification, said George Cohen, director of Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The Port of Baltimore has about 1,200 dockworkers represented by four locals.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court moved yesterday to settle a dispute among lower courts over the right of injured dockworkers to keep their disability benefits even if they get a better-paying job.The justices voted to consider the appeal of a Los Angeles stevedore company, which contends that benefits should be reduced or wiped out if a dockworker who is getting disability pay eventually earns more money. That is the position the Labor Department takes.But lower federal courts have failed to agree on the issue.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer John Rivera contributed to this article | October 3, 1996
Angry Baltimore dockworkers last night overwhelmingly rejected a five-year contract, branding it as the worst agreement in more than a quarter of a century.The rejection sent leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association and port employers back to the bargaining table today, although work on the docks continued.By a 736-129 vote, Longshoremen yesterday torpedoed the proposed local contract that would have eliminated the Guaranteed Annual Income program and made sharp cuts in both the wages and gang size affecting break-bulk cargo.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff Reporter Liz Atwood contributed to this article | November 30, 1990
Dockworkers and waterfront management at the Port of Baltimore today reached a tentative contract agreement, averting a threatened midnight strike.Port officials said the pact contains significant changes that could help the ailing port regain lost business.The Baltimore District Council of the International Longshoremen's Association scheduled a meeting this evening to present the proposed settlement to the membership. A ratification vote is to be held Monday.The two sides agreed to extend the current contract, affecting about 2,000 dockworkers, until the vote.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
Baltimore dockworkers vote today on an unprecedented five-year contract that contains the sharpest cuts in the local union's history, a reflection of the intense competition for ships and cargo among East Coast ports.International Longshoremen's Association leaders and port employers reached an 11th-hour agreement yesterday on a local contract that would eliminate the three-decade-old Guaranteed Annual Income program, long a sacred cow for the ILA, and reduce the wage and gang size for handling break-bulk cargo.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
Baltimore dockworkers narrowly approved a new five-year local contract last night, averting a possible work stoppage that could have diverted badly needed cargo from the port.Reversing an overwhelmingly negative vote of one week ago, members of the International Longshoremen's Association here voted 456 to 421 to accept the agreement, which includes a controversial $4,000 cash payment in exchange for eliminating the union's sacred guaranteed annual income program.Dockworkers also accepted cuts in wages and the size of work gangs for break-bulk cargo, though the cuts in gangs were less than those in the original contract rejected Oct. 2.Work continued on the docks after the union rejected the pact by a 736-to-129 vote last week, with both sides agreeing to extend the old contract while talks resumed.
NEWS
October 9, 1996
BALTIMORE'S PORT finds itself at a critical juncture today as dockworkers vote on a new contract. A second rejection could severely damage the maritime industry here, threatening the rTC livelihoods of 80,000 Marylanders whose incomes depend on a healthy port.It isn't an easy choice for members of the International Longshoremen's Association. They are being asked to give up their Guaranteed Annual Income program, an expensive and hard-won concession that ensures paychecks for some members regardless of whether they work.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
The CSX Transportation dockworker who is suing a Panamanian shipping company for $5.2 million in connection with an accident at a Curtis Bay coal pier last August will be in court next week on charges he sexually abused a child. David Rienas, 42, of Abingdon was indicted in December on three counts of sexual misconduct for an encounter last year, Harford County Circuit Court records show. He faces a felony charge that carries a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison and two misdemeanors.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
A CSX Transportation dockworker who says he suffered disabling injuries last August when a tanker collided with a Curtis Bay pier has filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit in U.S. District Court against the shipping company. David Rienas of Abingdon was atop a coal-loading machine on the Bayside Coal Pier when the Wawasan Ruby struck, "causing it to be dragged down the pier with great force," according to the suit, filed Friday. Rienas, 42, is asking the court for $5.2 million as compensation for back, neck and rib injuries that have kept him from working and have, he says, caused him permanent injuries "including mental anguish, fright and emotional distress and disfigurement.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
Port of Baltimore officials say they "are preparing for the worst," in the event of a longshoremen's strike at one minute past midnight Dec. 30. But that would be nothing, they say, compared with a management decision to lock out workers at the deadline — a move that would bring work on cargo ships and cruise ships to a halt. As the deadline approaches, Baltimore officials are preparing a strike plan that incorporates an accelerated work schedule next week to move as much cargo as possible, and security measures with the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, the Coast Guard and Baltimore city and county police.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
With time running out before the contract expires, the union representing 14,500 longshoremen on the East and Gulf coasts and the port employers' organization will meet Wednesday morning with a federal mediator to try to avert the first strike in 35 years. Talks on a master contract covering 14 ports, including Baltimore, broke off in late August with leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association and the U.S. Maritime Alliance accusing each other of bargaining in bad faith.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Federal mediators will attempt to restart stalled contract talks between the union representing 14,500 East and Gulf coast dockworkers and the group representing their employers in an effort to avert the first strike in 35 years. A strike would clot the shipment of billions of dollars of goods in and out of the eastern United States at the peak of the holiday shipping season, potentially driving up prices and threatening the nation's nascent economic recovery. The dockworkers' current contract expires Oct. 1. Baltimore port officials greeted word of federal mediators' intervention with relief.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
Baltimore dockworkers are expected to vote again tomorrow on a contract that union leaders say is necessary to lure badly needed work to the port. But the outcome remains highly uncertain, with the rank-and-file bitterly splintered over whether or not to abandon the union's Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI) program."Whether or not we keep the GAI is a very divisive thing," said Bill Schonowski, president of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association, which represents about 800 dockworkers.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
From the beginning, the message was clear: Work was vanishing in the port of Baltimore, and in the face of vast competition, failure by longshoremen here to make major concessions could only spell doom for an already troubled port.It was crisis time on the docks. Even leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association said so.Not that they had to.For most dockworkers, the early morning trip to a grimy cinder-block hiring hall in East Baltimore was a daily reminder. There, they lined up in front of the large letters on the wall that designated seniority.
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