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By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1994
A wife-beating charge against prominent Baltimore attorney William H. Murphy Jr. was put aside yesterday when a judge agreed to place the case on an inactive docket.In a brief hearing in Baltimore Circuit Court, prosecutor Donald Huskey said: "By the agreement of the parties, the state and Mr. Murphy have requested that the court place this case on the stet docket for a period of six months in their mutual belief that such a resolution is in the best interest of justice and in the best interest of all the parties."
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Cases involving establishments that may have been operating in violation of city liquor laws, outside the parameters of their specific license or without a proper license at all are among the hearings listed on the Sept. 26 docket of the Board of Liquor License Commissioners for Baltimore City. Among the establishments scheduled for hearings on Sept. 26 are Canton's Portside Tavern , where after-hours drinking allegedly took place on April 7, Phillips Seafood , which was allegedly operating without a valid license on May 7 and The Chesapeake , which was observed providing outdoor table service on July 19 and 20 (Artscape weekend)
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2002
Baltimore Circuit Judge Stuart R. Berger will no longer be in charge of the criminal docket after Jan. 6, when he relinquishes his duties for health reasons, Administrative Law Judge Ellen M. Heller announced yesterday. Berger, 43, will focus on trials and will be replaced by Judge John M. Glynn, Heller said. Berger's health concern was not specified. Glynn will have help from three judges Heller has appointed to oversee specific aspects of the docket: Thomas E. Noel, Lynn K. Stewart, and John Philip Miller.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
Caught with a couple of joints he didn't get the chance to light up, Eric Staton was ordered to appear before a Baltimore judge. Two weeks later, in a basement courtroom on North Avenue, prosecutors said they would drop the possession charge if Staton agreed to pick up trash for five hours. Staton, 42, hesitated before taking the deal. "Ten grams is nothing," he told a spectator during the hearing. "They should legalize that marijuana. " In recent years, Maryland has taken small steps to scale back laws against possession of marijuana.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
In the battle to shrink the backlog of criminal cases in the city's circuit courts, Baltimore judges declared victory this week: It's not as bad as they thought it was. Officials have been working for nearly two years to reduce the number of defendants awaiting trial after four defendants had murder charges dismissed because their trial had been delayed for three years. In addition, judges recently discovered that the computer system was overcounting the number of defendants awaiting trial, once thought to be more than 5,000.
NEWS
By Wendy Young | January 28, 2010
The scene in a Baltimore immigration courtroom on a late October morning was unusual. Several dozen children of all ages filled the galley benches - from a 5-year-old girl in pigtails to several 17-year-old boys in dress shirts, and all ages in between. Aunts, uncles and guardians filled the seats around them. The judge was in his usual place before the court, but instead of immediately banging the gavel and calling cases, he was addressing the children, patiently explaining the duties of the officials in the courtroom, what the children should expect during their appearance before him, and stressing the importance of education.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
In a brief but contentious District Court hearing yesterday, a Baltimore County assistant state's attorney declined to prosecute eight anti-war protesters arrested last year at Towson Town Center on trespassing charges. The protesters asked to read a short statement about their demonstration March 1 at the mall, where they distributed 500 pamphlets about the then-looming war with Iraq. But Judge Bruce S. Lamdin denied the request, angrily telling the group that if they spoke without answering a question put to them, they would be arrested.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2001
Seven months after its launch, a program designed to dispose of half of minor court cases within 24 hours is falling short of the mark, the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council announced yesterday. The disposition rate has been 32.4 percent. But panel members and Mayor Martin O'Malley - he set the 50 percent goal for the program - said they are not disappointed with the number, which they expect to rise. "I think we're making progress," O'Malley said yesterday in a telephone interview hours after the council met. "The early dispositions aren't an end in and of themselves," the mayor said.
NEWS
By NORRIS P. WEST and NORRIS P. WEST,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1995
Herman Madison Henderson recalled being "quite irritated" when he was arrested last month in a homicide committed 26 years ago.Mr. Henderson said he thought charges lodged against him in 1969 in the shooting death of a reputed city drug lord had been dismissed and forgotten. He's been living in Reservoir Hill, is self-employed as a contractor, and has been married and divorced and has seen his three children become adults since then, he said.But the murder charges resurfaced Sept. 5, when he was arrested by an FBI fugitive task force.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Gambling charges against a state lawmaker's brother and three others were set aside on an inactive docket Monday in Baltimore County District Court in Towson, meaning the court made no finding of guilt or innocence in the case alleging that a Dundalk tavern made cash payouts on video game machines. Daniel J. Minnick, 86, brother of state Del. Joseph "Sonny" Minnick, who was also a part-owner of Minnick's on Sollers Point Road, agreed as a condition of setting aside the charges to forfeit five video game machines and half the cash confiscated in a police raid on June 29. Police alleged that the bar/restaurant was making payouts to customers playing the machines.
SPORTS
By Chris Dufresne, Tribune Newspapers | December 4, 2011
The verdict has been rendered, and there will be a rematch. No. 2 Alabama (11-1) edged out No. 3 Oklahoma State (11-1) in Sunday's final Bowl Championship Series standings to earn the right to play No. 1 LSU for the national title Jan. 9 in New Orleans. So was the verdict wrong? "For whatever reason, we came up a little bit short," a disappointed Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy said. "We all have to live with the system," Alabama coach Nick Saban said on ESPN's bowl selection show.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | February 18, 2011
Drug charges against Ravens kick returner David Reed have been moved to the inactive docket by Baltimore County prosecutors, effectively dropping the case. Reed was charged Dec. 8 with possession of marijuana. Lt. Robert McCullough told The Sun at the time that Baltimore County police were called to Reed's Owings Mills apartment to investigate "possible narcotics. " Though the case was set for a court date next week, prosecutors on Friday placed the case on the "stet" docket, meaning the case will not be pursued and will eventually be dropped after a year.
SPORTS
February 13, 2011
There is free-flowing water where Simkins Dam once stood. But the Patapsco River dam lives on, in a way. The steel rebar that gave it backbone has been trucked to a recycling bin while the concrete awaits a new job as artificial reef material for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation oyster restoration project. Serena McClain , of the environmental group American Rivers, says most of the grading at the site is done and when it warms up, native grasses, trees and shrubs will be planted and the construction bridge will be removed.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Whit MacCuaig took off work to fight his $252 ticket for double-parking in front of his Gough Street rowhouse. He went to court Thursday dressed in a suit and armed with photographs and a letter from a city councilman pleading for leniency. Turns out, he didn't really have to go to court at all. District Judge Charles A. Chiapparelli found MacCuaig not guilty before he could fully rise from the gallery bench, a scene played out over and over again during the 9 a.m. docket in Room 6 at the John R. Hargrove courthouse on South Baltimore's Patapsco Avenue.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 1, 2010
We, the people of Maryland, don't know our judges. Judges know judges. Lawyers know judges. Police officers know the judges of the Maryland District Court and, to some degree, the judges of the Circuit Court. I suppose the governors know the judges they appoint. But, for the most part, we don't know much about the judges who serve Baltimore and the counties of Maryland, though thousands of us have voted for dozens of them. It's time we paid more attention. Judge John Addison Howard's name has been in the news this past week; he's the Baltimore Circuit Court judge who had dealt leniently with John Wagner, the man accused in last Sunday's stabbing death of Stephen Pitcairn in Charles Village.
SPORTS
May 18, 2010
Tiger Woods has said he doesn't know when he'll return from his neck injury, but he filed his entry form for the British Open on Monday. The Open will be played at St. Andrews, one of Woods' favorite courses. He won his first British Open there in 2000 by eight strokes, and his 19-under 269 is the best score ever at St. Andrews. Woods has committed to two other events this summer, the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach June 17-20 and the AT&T National July 1-4, where his foundation is the benefiting charity.
NEWS
By Wendy Young | January 28, 2010
The scene in a Baltimore immigration courtroom on a late October morning was unusual. Several dozen children of all ages filled the galley benches - from a 5-year-old girl in pigtails to several 17-year-old boys in dress shirts, and all ages in between. Aunts, uncles and guardians filled the seats around them. The judge was in his usual place before the court, but instead of immediately banging the gavel and calling cases, he was addressing the children, patiently explaining the duties of the officials in the courtroom, what the children should expect during their appearance before him, and stressing the importance of education.
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