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By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2005
A longtime Department of Natural Resources official who has led the agency's push to introduce Asian oysters into the Chesapeake Bay retired last month and was promptly re-hired as a $25,000-a-year consultant. The retirement of W. Pete Jensen as deputy associate secretary could allow the former state employee to serve on a federal fisheries panel. Jensen left the state payroll April 29. DNR officials said yesterday that Jensen would work as the "lead consultant" to the department as it prepares its environmental impact study on whether to introduce the non-native oyster into the bay. A decision is expected by summer.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
A state park will be closed to the public for three days next month while world leaders gather nearby at the Camp David presidential retreat for the G-8 Summit, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The move is highly unusual, and may be without precedent. The closure of Cunningham Falls State Park in Frederick County, which has two public campgrounds, was requested by the U.S. Secret Service because of "security concerns," Lt. Col. Chris Bushman, a DNR spokesman, said Monday.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
A former Department of Natural Resources official who was forced to relinquish his $25,000- a-year contract with the agency this month has now been stripped of his temporary position on a multistate fisheries panel. W. Pete Jensen, who retired as DNR's deputy associate secretary in April and was brought back on a contract basis days later, had been filling in over the spring for state Sen. Richard F. Colburn as one of three people representing Maryland on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Janet S. McKegg, whose career with the Department of Natural Resources spanned nearly three decades, died Friday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Elternhaus, a Dayton assisted-living facility. The former West Friendship resident was 58. The daughter of a tool-and-die inspector and a seamstress, the former Janet Sponaugle was born in Washington County Hospital in Hagerstown. She was raised in Pleasant Valley near Boonsboro. A nature lover since she was a child, she often cared for the baby groundhogs and squirrels that her father had brought home to be raised.
NEWS
By Staff Report | May 13, 1993
An 8-year-old Prince George's County boy's fish story has state Department of Natural Resources officials buzzing.Testing out his new fishing rod at the Allen Pond Park in Bowie Saturday, Michael McManus landed an 11-inch piranha, a flesh-eating fish native to South America.Since Saturday, DNR officials have received five other reports of piranha in the five-acre pond, including one much larger than Michael's, said DNR spokesman John Verrico.Michael's piranha, which is being kept on ice in a cooler by his family, is the only one that has been confirmed.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
This winter's icy blast has left a potential fire hazard in its wake, officials say: Nature's "canopy" of tree tops that shields the forest floor from the sun's rays has been destroyed, making every dry leaf and branch fuel for wildfires.Normally the spring canopy keeps the ground in the shade and helps retain moisture and curb brush fires, Department of Natural Resources (DNR) officials said last week.Without that shield, leaves and branches dry out faster and can be dangerous fuel for a blaze.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 2, 2000
Hunters killed slightly more deer on the opening day of the modern firearms deer season this year than on the first day in 1999, despite cold rain and fog that blanketed the region. Check-in stations reported a 2 percent increase - 16,522 deer killed last Saturday compared to 16,181 deer taken a year ago - according to preliminary numbers compiled by the state Department of Natural Resources. The top 10 counties were: Frederick (1,797), Washington (1,511), Allegany (1,434), Carroll (1,292)
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 25, 2002
A Pennsylvania man fishing on a boat near the Conowingo Dam died yesterday after he fell overboard - the victim of an apparent drowning, the Department of Natural Resources reported. David B. Rutledge, 37, of Peach Bottom, Pa., was pronounced dead at Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace at 3:30 p.m. - an hour and a half after Maryland Natural Resources Police and local authorities pulled him from the water. He was not wearing a life jacket, said DNR spokeswoman Heather Lynch. DNR officials said Rutledge was alone on a 14-foot aluminum boat south of Rowland Island, below the dam, when he apparently leaned over the side and fell into the Susquehanna River about 12:50 p.m. Witnesses reported seeing a man floundering in the water before going under in the current.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2004
Pine Lake in Wheaton Regional Park in Montgomery County began slowly refilling with water yesterday after state officials who had drained it in search of northern snakeheads discovered no trace of the vicious Asian fish. An angler hooked a female snakehead at the lake April 26, and Department of Natural Resources officials worried that there might be more of them in the 5-acre lake. DNR officials, working with the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, which manages the park, started draining the lake Thursday.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 3, 1994
FREDERICK -- State officials yesterday rescinded an order to draw some water from a man-made lake at Lake Linganore at Eaglehead after tests showed an earthen dam was structurally safe."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
Since leaving Maryland government to become federal fisheries chief two months ago, Eric Schwaab has been besieged by unhappy recreational anglers, called ineffective by commercial fishermen and labeled an unknown know-nothing by New England editorial writers. But that was just a warm-up for the Catonsville resident's latest turn in the hot seat as point man for federal efforts to protect and save fish and shellfish in the path of the Gulf of Mexico oil disaster. "The biggest challenge in this case is that it's still a developing event," Schwaab, head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Fisheries Service, said on Friday from Pascagoula, Miss.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler | February 12, 2010
Eric Schwaab, the deputy secretary of Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, has been tapped by the Obama administration to run the National Marine Fisheries Service. Schwaab, a 23-year veteran at DNR, begins his new duties Tuesday as assistant administrator for fisheries at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In announcing his appointment on Wednesday, NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco noted Schwaab's "experience and proven leadership" and said he would bring "fresh perspective" to the agency's effort to rebuild the nation's fisheries and the livelihoods that depend on them.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 29, 2007
Two pieces of good news could be coming together for striped bass anglers on the Upper Chesapeake Bay. Fisheries managers will decide tomorrow whether to extend the catch-and-release season up on Susquehanna Flats. Water temperatures have remained chilly, which keeps mortality low and goes a long way toward ensuring that a big fish lives to swim another day. Last year, the Department of Natural Resources decided it would extend the season beyond May 3 if water temperatures stayed below 65 degrees.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | April 2, 2007
Public land next to the Severna Park home of a top Department of Natural Resources official is being landscaped under a state grant written by his wife and approved by one of his employees. Michael Slattery, the assistant secretary who oversees the Forest Service, and his wife, Britt, a one-time U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, are actively involved in the two-year project. A $5,800 grant and $12,000 worth of volunteer labor and nonmonetary contributions are paying for the work, according to the application filed with DNR. The project involves shoring up a slope, removing non-native vegetation and replacing it with more than 500 native plants on a 30-foot-wide strip of land between the Slatterys' backyard and the popular B&A Trail, a former rail bed that runs from Glen Burnie to Annapolis.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | October 31, 2006
An Eastern Shore judge has rejected a property owner's claim that the state should not have leased land on the bottom of Chincoteague Bay to a fledgling aquaculture business that has been raising clams in the bed. David and Jena Harvey, Pennsylvania residents who own property in Girdletree, had argued that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources had no right to let Steve and Christy Gordon use the public bottom to grow clams. Worcester County Circuit Judge Theodore R. Eschenburg Sr. threw out the claim, though he agreed with the Harveys' contention that the state surveyed the property incorrectly and that the Gordons would have to give up the bed - at least until DNR can resurvey it. DNR officials said they believe Gordon can keep the clams on the bed for 90 days while a survey is done.
NEWS
By RONA KOBELL and RONA KOBELL,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
The Ehrlich administration, which once planned to put Asian oysters in the Chesapeake Bay as early as February 2005, is delaying any decision on the matter for yet another year. The announcement yesterday marks the fourth delay for the project in less than two years. During that time, scientists, legislators and natural resources managers in neighboring states have criticized Maryland's push for Asian oysters as a reckless endeavor that could jeopardize the health of the ecosystem. Mike Slattery, assistant secretary at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, says the agency had hoped that by now it would have the information it needed to determine whether the state should introduce a new species.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Biologists should poison a Crofton pond with the plant-based substance rotenone as soon as possible to eradicate the exotic snakehead fish lurking there, according to a scientific panel's report submitted yesterday to Department of Natural Resources Secretary J. Charles Fox. Since the scientists met for the first time last week, there has been little debate that the oxygen-blocking fish poison is the best way to rid the pond off Route 3 of its snakeheads....
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2005
For two weeks next month, Maryland fishing enthusiasts will have a chance to mix their favorite pastime with a lottery-style game that could win them up to $1 million. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources will hold its first major fishing tournament in more than 20 years from sunrise June 3 to sunset June 18. Participants need not pay a fee or register for the contest. They can simply fish the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries for the tagged fish DNR officials will release at the start of the contest.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
A former Department of Natural Resources official who was forced to relinquish his $25,000- a-year contract with the agency this month has now been stripped of his temporary position on a multistate fisheries panel. W. Pete Jensen, who retired as DNR's deputy associate secretary in April and was brought back on a contract basis days later, had been filling in over the spring for state Sen. Richard F. Colburn as one of three people representing Maryland on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2005
Fed up with the troubles caused by deer in suburbia, Baltimore County officials are renewing efforts to curb the problem - even as some residents suggest that the time has come to bring in sharpshooters. Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. is asking officials from Baltimore City to help control the deer in the vast, city-owned woodlands surrounding the reservoirs that supply drinking water for much of the region. He's also asking state biologists to lend their expertise in finding ways to reduce the county's deer population.
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