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Dmitri Shostakovich

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NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1996
Benjamin Fleischmann, "Rothschild's Violin" (completed and orchestrated by Dmitri Shostakovich), performed by bass Sergei Leiferkus, soprano Marina Shaguch, tenor Konstantin Pluzhnikov, tenor Ilya Levinsky, and the Rotterdam Philharmonic, Gennady Rozhdestvensky conducting; Shostakovich, "From Jewish Folk Poetry" (opus 79a), performed by soprano Marina Shaguch, mezzo-soprano Larissa Diadkova, tenor Konstantin Pluzhnikov, and the Rotterdam Philharmonic, Rozhdestvensky conducting (BMG Classics RCA Victor Red Seal 09026-68434)
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 30, 2006
Dmitri Shostakovich, a master of internalization, left a world of secrets beneath his music. There is no single key to unlocking them, nor any assurance that we will ever know for certain everything he was thinking, but one possible path toward enlightenment is through another composer -- Gustav Mahler. For its opening program of the season, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is taking audiences down that path, guided by Yuri Temirkanov. The BSO performs at 8 tonight and 3 p.m. tomorrow at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $25 to $78. Call 410-783-8000 or visit baltimoresymphony.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | June 24, 2004
Chamber Festival The biennial New Chamber Festival Baltimore returns this weekend, and each concert is self-recommending. As in 2002, organizers have engaged top-notch ensembles to play an invigorating cross section of repertoire. The Endellion String Quartet will kick things off tomorrow night with works by Bela Bartok, Bohuslav Martinu and Leos Janacek and wrap up the weekend Sunday night with some more Bartok and pieces by Benjamin Britten and Robin Holloway. The Leipzig Quartet will perform music by Igor Stravinsky, Hans Eisler and Arnold Schoenberg on Saturday afternoon; Nicolai Roslavets, Toru Takemitsu, Charles Ives and Dmitri Shostakovich on Sunday afternoon.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 2006
Another glass ceiling can be heard breaking today as Marin Alsop becomes the first woman to conduct an entire program with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam, one of Europe's greatest ensembles. That sound will be carried live over the Internet, thanks to a Webcast. Audio of the program - Piano Concerto No. 1, Suite from The Bolt, and Jazz Suite No. 2 by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich - will be available for download later. Online A live Webcast of Marin Alsop's all-Shostakovich program with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam will be available online at 2:30 p.m. via rcolive.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 30, 2006
Dmitri Shostakovich, a master of internalization, left a world of secrets beneath his music. There is no single key to unlocking them, nor any assurance that we will ever know for certain everything he was thinking, but one possible path toward enlightenment is through another composer -- Gustav Mahler. For its opening program of the season, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is taking audiences down that path, guided by Yuri Temirkanov. The BSO performs at 8 tonight and 3 p.m. tomorrow at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $25 to $78. Call 410-783-8000 or visit baltimoresymphony.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 2006
Another glass ceiling can be heard breaking today as Marin Alsop becomes the first woman to conduct an entire program with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam, one of Europe's greatest ensembles. That sound will be carried live over the Internet, thanks to a Webcast. Audio of the program - Piano Concerto No. 1, Suite from The Bolt, and Jazz Suite No. 2 by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich - will be available for download later. Online A live Webcast of Marin Alsop's all-Shostakovich program with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam will be available online at 2:30 p.m. via rcolive.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 2001
It seemed as if two incarnations of the Moscow String Quartet showed up to play Saturday evening at Smith Theatre under the auspices of the Candlelight Concerts Society. The first one opened the concert with rather unaffecting traversals of Robert Schumann's A major Quartet and the single-movement "Quartettsatz" of Franz Schubert. But after intermission, violinists Euguenia Alikhanova and Galina Kokhanovskaia, violist Tatiana Kokhanovskaia and cellist Olga Ogranovitch gave us a revelatory reading of Dmitri Shostakovich's 3rd String Quartet that cemented the group's status as one of the world's high-quality chamber ensembles.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
Jason Love and his Columbia Orchestra concluded the ensemble's 25th anniversary season at Jim Rouse Theatre on Saturday evening by staring down the turbulent 5th Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich. And true to form, neither Love nor his players flinched. Shostakovich spent most of his artistic life being bullied and harassed by the Soviet government, which perceived the moody ambiguity of his music as a threat to the dictum that "scientific socialism" would produce nothing but smiles of gratitude in Stalin's Communist paradise.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
Concert will celebrate 20th-century composers Chamber Music on the Hill will honor composers born near the start of the 20th century at 7 p.m. Sunday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. Part of a series at the college, the concert will feature WMC performers David Duree, Kyle Engler, Linda Kirkpatrick and David Kreider; Julie Gregorian, Esther Mellon-Thompson and Melissa Zaraya, all of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Evan Walker of Carroll Community College; and area professional musicians Lynn Griffith and Mindy Niles.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 1999
When the musicians of the Annapolis Symphony take the stage this weekend at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts to play the 3rd Symphony of Ludwig van Beethoven, they're sure to take the experience in stride.After all, Beethoven's "Eroica" (Heroic) Symphony has been part of the standard repertory since its first performance at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on April 7, 1805.But how jaws must have dropped when those Viennese musicians got their first look at the master's monumental score!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 28, 2004
If Gustav Mahler composed the most profound farewell in all of music, through the combined expressive weight of his Ninth Symphony and Das Lied von Der Erde, Richard Strauss surely composed the most sublime, through his Four Last Songs. I don't think I could ever tire of hearing those Mahler works. Same for the Strauss, whether on records -- I've collected at least 20 versions -- or in concert. Something about these songs for soprano and orchestra draws me in, moves me every time. Technical characteristics or interpretive decisions of an individual performance may disappoint me, but never (so far)
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | June 24, 2004
Chamber Festival The biennial New Chamber Festival Baltimore returns this weekend, and each concert is self-recommending. As in 2002, organizers have engaged top-notch ensembles to play an invigorating cross section of repertoire. The Endellion String Quartet will kick things off tomorrow night with works by Bela Bartok, Bohuslav Martinu and Leos Janacek and wrap up the weekend Sunday night with some more Bartok and pieces by Benjamin Britten and Robin Holloway. The Leipzig Quartet will perform music by Igor Stravinsky, Hans Eisler and Arnold Schoenberg on Saturday afternoon; Nicolai Roslavets, Toru Takemitsu, Charles Ives and Dmitri Shostakovich on Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
Jason Love and his Columbia Orchestra concluded the ensemble's 25th anniversary season at Jim Rouse Theatre on Saturday evening by staring down the turbulent 5th Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich. And true to form, neither Love nor his players flinched. Shostakovich spent most of his artistic life being bullied and harassed by the Soviet government, which perceived the moody ambiguity of his music as a threat to the dictum that "scientific socialism" would produce nothing but smiles of gratitude in Stalin's Communist paradise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 16, 2003
Twenty-three stories above Broadway, on New York's upper West Side, Solomon Volkov and his wife, Marianna, occupy a small flat crammed with neatly arranged books, recordings, mementos. Floor space is at a minimum, what with a baby grand piano and a bed in the living room. Something about the space suggests the kind of tight quarters that people have long been used to in Russia. Something about the lack of contemporary amenities specifically suggests the old Soviet days -- a single telephone, of 1970s vintage; no answering machine, no fax, no computer.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 2001
It seemed as if two incarnations of the Moscow String Quartet showed up to play Saturday evening at Smith Theatre under the auspices of the Candlelight Concerts Society. The first one opened the concert with rather unaffecting traversals of Robert Schumann's A major Quartet and the single-movement "Quartettsatz" of Franz Schubert. But after intermission, violinists Euguenia Alikhanova and Galina Kokhanovskaia, violist Tatiana Kokhanovskaia and cellist Olga Ogranovitch gave us a revelatory reading of Dmitri Shostakovich's 3rd String Quartet that cemented the group's status as one of the world's high-quality chamber ensembles.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
Concert will celebrate 20th-century composers Chamber Music on the Hill will honor composers born near the start of the 20th century at 7 p.m. Sunday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. Part of a series at the college, the concert will feature WMC performers David Duree, Kyle Engler, Linda Kirkpatrick and David Kreider; Julie Gregorian, Esther Mellon-Thompson and Melissa Zaraya, all of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Evan Walker of Carroll Community College; and area professional musicians Lynn Griffith and Mindy Niles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 16, 2003
Twenty-three stories above Broadway, on New York's upper West Side, Solomon Volkov and his wife, Marianna, occupy a small flat crammed with neatly arranged books, recordings, mementos. Floor space is at a minimum, what with a baby grand piano and a bed in the living room. Something about the space suggests the kind of tight quarters that people have long been used to in Russia. Something about the lack of contemporary amenities specifically suggests the old Soviet days -- a single telephone, of 1970s vintage; no answering machine, no fax, no computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 28, 2004
If Gustav Mahler composed the most profound farewell in all of music, through the combined expressive weight of his Ninth Symphony and Das Lied von Der Erde, Richard Strauss surely composed the most sublime, through his Four Last Songs. I don't think I could ever tire of hearing those Mahler works. Same for the Strauss, whether on records -- I've collected at least 20 versions -- or in concert. Something about these songs for soprano and orchestra draws me in, moves me every time. Technical characteristics or interpretive decisions of an individual performance may disappoint me, but never (so far)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 1999
When the musicians of the Annapolis Symphony take the stage this weekend at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts to play the 3rd Symphony of Ludwig van Beethoven, they're sure to take the experience in stride.After all, Beethoven's "Eroica" (Heroic) Symphony has been part of the standard repertory since its first performance at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on April 7, 1805.But how jaws must have dropped when those Viennese musicians got their first look at the master's monumental score!
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1996
Benjamin Fleischmann, "Rothschild's Violin" (completed and orchestrated by Dmitri Shostakovich), performed by bass Sergei Leiferkus, soprano Marina Shaguch, tenor Konstantin Pluzhnikov, tenor Ilya Levinsky, and the Rotterdam Philharmonic, Gennady Rozhdestvensky conducting; Shostakovich, "From Jewish Folk Poetry" (opus 79a), performed by soprano Marina Shaguch, mezzo-soprano Larissa Diadkova, tenor Konstantin Pluzhnikov, and the Rotterdam Philharmonic, Rozhdestvensky conducting (BMG Classics RCA Victor Red Seal 09026-68434)
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