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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 12, 1999
Dmitri Kitaenko has every right to be a bitter man.A little more that 20 years ago, he got swept away by the forces of history and -- on this side of the Atlantic, at least -- disappeared.In 1977, he was a much-talked-about young Russian conductor who seemed to have a major international career in his grasp.He already had led two successful coast-to-coast tours of Russian orchestras.He had just made his debut with a major American symphony, the legendary Philadelphia Orchestra.His unusual program -- which included the nowadays still-exotic, but then almost completely unknown Scriabin Second Symphony -- attracted the attention of critics throughout North America.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Among those most deeply affected by the death of cellist Dmitry Volkov were his colleagues in the award-winning Russia Trio -- pianist Katherine Harris Rick and violinist Nikita Borisevich. At Monday's memorial held at the Peabody Conservatory, where Mr. Volkov and the other trio members did graduate studies, Ms Rick delivered these touching remarks about her friend: I remember very vividly the first time I met Dmitry. I had heard the buzz about his incredible playing that went around when he first arrived on campus, so when I received a call from him about needing an accompanist for something, I immediately started practicing.
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SPORTS
April 11, 2002
On deck Bartolo Colon of the Indians will try to improve to 3-0 and lead the Indians to a four-game sweep of the Twins. He said it "It's not cool. All the sudden, everybody is turning their backs to us and now it's us against everybody." Dmitri Young, Tigers first baseman, on his team's 0-8 start
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
On Monday morning, friends of Dmitry Volkov, the talented cellist who died unexpectedly in Baltimore on May 10 at the age of 26, gathered at the Peabody Institute, where he recently earned an artist's diploma. Among those deeply affected by the loss of this promising musician is Daniel Heifetz, president and founder of Heifetz International Music Institute in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov was artist in residence. On Wednesday, Mr. Heifetz will accompany the body of the cellist back to his parents in Russia.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan A. Azrael | November 10, 2002
When the Latansky family bought their first home in America, the parents, Boris and Natasha, made the down payment. Nobody paid attention to the deed, which named their son, Dmitri, and daughter-in-law, Anna, as the sole owners. For several years, they lived together peacefully. Boris and Natasha worked hard to pay the mortgage, utilities and upkeep on the home. After all, Dmitri contributed money for food, and Anna had the little ones to care for. Then, trouble began. The relationship between Dmitri's parents and their daughter-in-law became increasingly strained.
SPORTS
By SPORTSTICKER | July 15, 1998
If you can't beat 'em, raid 'em.The Washington Capitals, who were swept by Detroit in the Stanley Cup Finals, yesterday signed former Red Wings defenseman Dmitri Mironov, an unrestricted free agent whose slap shot is one of the hardest in the NHL.Mironov, 32, split last season between the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim and the Red Wings, finishing with eight goals and 35 assists in 77 games. The offensive-minded defenseman was a healthy scratch for 15 of 22 playoff games."Dmitri adds mobility, size and offense," said general manager George McPhee.
SPORTS
August 8, 1998
Astros: The Astrodome's previous record crowd during the regular season was 51,526 on May 16 against Atlanta. In last year's playoffs, Houston set its postseason record by drawing 53,688 against the Braves.Reds: Dmitri Young's sixth-inning double was his 40th, the most in the majors and the most by a Cincinnati player since Chris Sabo hit 40 in 1988.Pub Date: 8/08/98
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 21, 2001
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - A man named Dostoyevsky leads the way, up the silent stairwell, past closed doors that conceal - what? Sin? Suffering? The psychological torments of remorse, redemption, belief, and doubt? Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, the great Russian writer, lived in this five-story corner building on Kuznechny Lane. Dostoyevsky, the author of "Crime and Punishment," wrote "The Brothers Karamazov" here, and died here Jan. 28, 1881. Today, another Dostoyevsky is climbing these stairs.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 2001
Watching Ninel Cherevko dance the role of Cinderella or Snow White at Ballet Theater of Maryland almost makes one believe in fairy tales, and when her husband, Dmitri Malikov, joins her, the magic is complete. Off stage, the couple retains another sort of magic in their partnership, which began in 1992. Cherevko explains, "We do things together the way we dance. We have a partnership. He's strong on stage, strong in lifts, but when we're working together, I can't relax anyway. It's a partnership."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 2001
Watching Ninel Cherevko dance the role of Cinderella or Snow White at Ballet Theater of Maryland almost makes one believe in fairy tales, and when her husband Dmitri Malikov joins her, the magic is complete. Off stage, the couple retains another sort of magic in their partnership, which began in 1992. Cherevko explains, "We do things together the way we dance. We have a partnership. He's strong on stage, strong in lifts, but when we're working together, I can't relax anyway. It's a partnership."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
(UPDATED 5/15 WITH PROBABLE CAUSE OF DEATH) Dmitry Volkov, a promising Russian-born cellist who received an Artist Diploma from Peabody Conservatory last year, died on May 10 while visiting Baltimore. He was 26. The cause of death appears to have been a heart defect. "The preliminary word is that it was cardiac arrhythmia," said violinist Daniel Heifetz, founder of the Heifetz International Music Institute at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov had been an artist in residence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Dmitri Hvorostovsky, the Russian baritone who will give a recital for the Washington Performing Arts Society at the Kennedy Center Wednesday night, has one of the finest voices of our time. He doesn't mind saying so himself. “It is still a perfect instrument,” the 50-year-old Hvorostovsky said from New York, where he recently wrapped up well-received performances as Rodrigo in Verdi's epic “Don Carlo” at the Metropolitan Opera. “Of course the color has changed, but I've managed to keep it fresh.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
Just when you thought baseball players were as staid and personality-challenged as pro golfers, the Boston Red Sox and their idiots won the 2004 World Series. They added much-needed color to baseball's bland landscape last season. But not all of the sport's characters wear "B's" on their hats. There are some without rings, some away from the burning spotlight, who can still fill up a notebook. One of baseball's most outspoken players passed through Camden Yards last week, with a hot bat and a sizzling mouth.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan A. Azrael | November 10, 2002
When the Latansky family bought their first home in America, the parents, Boris and Natasha, made the down payment. Nobody paid attention to the deed, which named their son, Dmitri, and daughter-in-law, Anna, as the sole owners. For several years, they lived together peacefully. Boris and Natasha worked hard to pay the mortgage, utilities and upkeep on the home. After all, Dmitri contributed money for food, and Anna had the little ones to care for. Then, trouble began. The relationship between Dmitri's parents and their daughter-in-law became increasingly strained.
SPORTS
April 11, 2002
On deck Bartolo Colon of the Indians will try to improve to 3-0 and lead the Indians to a four-game sweep of the Twins. He said it "It's not cool. All the sudden, everybody is turning their backs to us and now it's us against everybody." Dmitri Young, Tigers first baseman, on his team's 0-8 start
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 2001
Watching Ninel Cherevko dance the role of Cinderella or Snow White at Ballet Theater of Maryland almost makes one believe in fairy tales, and when her husband, Dmitri Malikov, joins her, the magic is complete. Off stage, the couple retains another sort of magic in their partnership, which began in 1992. Cherevko explains, "We do things together the way we dance. We have a partnership. He's strong on stage, strong in lifts, but when we're working together, I can't relax anyway. It's a partnership."
SPORTS
May 1, 2000
Quote: "There were a few times when I thought it was a routine fly ball and then I turn around and it's to the warning track. It's not a fun place to pitch." -- Mets' Al Leiter, who won for the first time in four starts at Coors Field, 14-11 It's a fact: The Diamondbacks' Randy Johnson has three RBIs, two fewer than the number of earned runs he has allowed. Who's hot: The Reds' Dmitri Young is .500 (11-for-22) over the past six games. Who's not: Dodgers catchers have failed to throw out a runner in 20 stolen-base attempts this season.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 10, 1996
When Mary Lou Magee wraps her tonsils around a song, the earth moves a little. Birds plop out of trees, wondering why they can't belt like her. When she stands in front of the Untouchables and does "Proud Mary" or "Piece of My Heart," you think of Tina Turner or Janis Joplin on a particularly feisty day.But she's pure Mary Lou, subtle as a punch in the nose, a blond, 250-pound block of energy who's sitting here at the Windsor Inn with a plate of food in...
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 2001
Watching Ninel Cherevko dance the role of Cinderella or Snow White at Ballet Theater of Maryland almost makes one believe in fairy tales, and when her husband Dmitri Malikov joins her, the magic is complete. Off stage, the couple retains another sort of magic in their partnership, which began in 1992. Cherevko explains, "We do things together the way we dance. We have a partnership. He's strong on stage, strong in lifts, but when we're working together, I can't relax anyway. It's a partnership."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 21, 2001
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - A man named Dostoyevsky leads the way, up the silent stairwell, past closed doors that conceal - what? Sin? Suffering? The psychological torments of remorse, redemption, belief, and doubt? Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, the great Russian writer, lived in this five-story corner building on Kuznechny Lane. Dostoyevsky, the author of "Crime and Punishment," wrote "The Brothers Karamazov" here, and died here Jan. 28, 1881. Today, another Dostoyevsky is climbing these stairs.
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