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By Jules Witcover | July 31, 2002
NEW YORK -- Members of the Democratic Leadership Council, which fashions itself the pro-business, pro-growth arm of the party of Jefferson and Jackson, gave corporate America a pretty good going-over for its corruption and greed at their annual meeting here this week. They joined the general assault on CEOs for the disclosures of various sorts of financial hanky-panky that sent the stock market in a spin and have created widespread apprehension among investors. Democratic Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, traditionally a champion of businessmen, characterized some of them as "con artists and thieves" who, "to satisfy their personal greed," were busy "wringing the last dollar out of their cooked books."
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 26, 2005
COLUMBUS, Ohio - The Democratic Leadership Council, an organization of influential party moderates, named Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York yesterday to direct a new initiative to define a party agenda for the 2006 and 2008 elections. The appointment solidified the identification of Clinton - once considered a champion of the party's left - with the centrist movement that helped propel her husband to the White House in 1992. It also continued her effort, which has accelerated in recent months, to present herself as a moderate on issues such as national security, immigration and abortion.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The message in President Clinton's awkward confrontation with the Democratic Leadership Council is that he faces a tricky balancing act in dealing with his own party over the next two years. His success or failure may well determine whether he can be re-elected in 1996.The president was uncharacteristically blunt when he told the DLC to "join me in the arena, not in the peanut gallery" -- meaning that it is time for these conservative Democrats to join in helping the administration rather than simply taking shots from the sidelines.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Democratic Leadership Council, the centrist organization that with some justification takes credit for twice electing Bill Clinton president, called in a number of its up-and-coming members the other day to hear him and other DLC leaders tell how President Bush can be beaten in 2004. The advice was to choose a candidate who is strong on national defense and, as DLC spokesmen Al From and Bruce Reed put it in a memo, champions "the mainstream values, national pride and economic aspirations of middle-class and working people who are the real soul of the Democratic Party."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 8, 1992
THE MARYLAND CHAPTER of the Democratic Leadership Council holds its kickoff event tonight in Annapolis.The DLC was founded in 1985 and dedicated to making the national Democratic Party over into a "moderate progressive" one.The Annapolis event comes at a time when DLC-ers could not be more pleased with themselves. Why? Well, why not? After all:* The Democratic Party this year produced its first relatively moderate platform in over two decades. Al From, the president and executive director of the DLC, had something to do with that.
NEWS
April 22, 1991
The Democratic Leadership Council holds its first convention next month in Cleveland. Jesse Jackson and George McGovern will not be there -- at least not as speakers. DLC Executive Director Al From said they were not invited to speak because, "We are trying to change the party, and Jackson and McGovern represent. . . old-style politics. . . the ideological approach to government we are trying to change." A Jackson aide characterized it as a "heavy slight." Mr. Jackson wrote several DLC leaders asking if Mr. From "was speaking on your behalf, too?"
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | May 9, 1991
ClevelandTHE MOVERS and shakers of the Democratic Leadership Council have always insisted that the organization was devoted to finding new and innovative solutions to national problems. But no one is kidding the troops. What the DLC is really seeking is not just solutions to problems but -- as the DLC chairman, Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas, observed here -- a change in the perception of the party among conservative white voters who have been deserting the Democratic line in droves in presidential elections.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Democratic Leadership Council, the centrist organization that with some justification takes credit for twice electing Bill Clinton president, called in a number of its up-and-coming members the other day to hear him and other DLC leaders tell how President Bush can be beaten in 2004. The advice was to choose a candidate who is strong on national defense and, as DLC spokesmen Al From and Bruce Reed put it in a memo, champions "the mainstream values, national pride and economic aspirations of middle-class and working people who are the real soul of the Democratic Party."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 9, 2002
I SEE WHERE the Democratic Leadership Council invited Martin O'Malley to New York in an effort to suck the young Baltimore mayor into its conservative-leaning, servant-to-Wall Street ranks before it's too late. Hoping to strike while the iron is hot and forge O'Malley into another pretty but mush-mouthed politician like Bill Clinton, the DLC got the mayor and the former president on stage for some schmoozy photographs and another one of those famous council discussions about the Democratic Party's future.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | July 18, 1999
POLITICS in much of the Western world has been redefined by a movement called the "third way." In the United States, Germany, Britain, France, Italy and now Israel, candidates espousing an approach that is just to the right of center have swept into office.In Baltimore this past week, the group that started this movement, the Democratic Leadership Council, cheered its biggest success story, President Clinton.The group had much to celebrate -- and much to worry about.The DLC concluded in the conservative Reagan years of the 1980s that hard-line liberals had wandered too far left of the vast majority of Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and By Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
In February 1954, Dwight Eisenhower was one year into his presidency, the first by a Republican in 20 years. He said in a Lincoln Day speech to his supporters: "... be conservative, and don't be afraid to use the word." For 20 years "conservative" had been an epithet directed at the mostly Republican politicians and businessmen who were blamed for the Great Depression, then opposed the Democrats' New Deal efforts to protect victims of ruthless special interests and laissez faire federal government.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 9, 2002
I SEE WHERE the Democratic Leadership Council invited Martin O'Malley to New York in an effort to suck the young Baltimore mayor into its conservative-leaning, servant-to-Wall Street ranks before it's too late. Hoping to strike while the iron is hot and forge O'Malley into another pretty but mush-mouthed politician like Bill Clinton, the DLC got the mayor and the former president on stage for some schmoozy photographs and another one of those famous council discussions about the Democratic Party's future.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
NEW YORK - Martin O'Malley strode onto a stage with Bill Clinton yesterday, as a crowd at New York University rose to applaud and the snowy-haired former president wrapped his arm around the young Baltimore mayor. The moment - captured by more than a dozen television cameras and more than 20 reporters from around the country - came at the climax of a two-day conference of Democratic activists who are debating ways to retake the White House after demoralizing defeats in 2000 and last month.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 2, 2002
NEW YORK -- Sen. Joe Lieberman created a bit of a stir at the Democratic Leadership Council meeting this week by taking issue with the language used in the 2000 election by ticket-mate Al Gore, who criticized Republican coziness with corporate America. Mr. Gore had said in his nomination acceptance speech and during the campaign that "we're for the people, they're for the powerful," words that Mr. Lieberman said didn't square with the DLC philosophy of making an ally of big business, not an enemy.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 31, 2002
NEW YORK -- Members of the Democratic Leadership Council, which fashions itself the pro-business, pro-growth arm of the party of Jefferson and Jackson, gave corporate America a pretty good going-over for its corruption and greed at their annual meeting here this week. They joined the general assault on CEOs for the disclosures of various sorts of financial hanky-panky that sent the stock market in a spin and have created widespread apprehension among investors. Democratic Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, traditionally a champion of businessmen, characterized some of them as "con artists and thieves" who, "to satisfy their personal greed," were busy "wringing the last dollar out of their cooked books."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2000
The gathering of the Democratic Leadership Council at the Omni Hotel yesterday came off as something of a political version of "Star Search." That television show was supposed to find the entertainment stars of the future; the DLC's "national conversation" showcases the political leaders of tomorrow. "I'm sure there's a future president in this room," said Al From, president of the DLC. "I just don't know who it is." From's political handicapping acumen is held in some esteem as early on he backed Bill Clinton - one of the first to join From's organization, which seeks to keep the Democratic Party afloat in the deep waters of the mainstream.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore will be the featured guests at a gathering of the Democratic Leadership Council in Baltimore next month, the group announced yesterday. The centrist DLC's "national conversation" is expected to attract more than 150 Democratic officials from around the country to discuss issues. Clinton, one of the early leaders of the DLC, is to participate in an interactive discussion on the Internet with British Prime Minister Tony Blair July 14. Organizers said about 50,000 Internet users will be able to log on with the two leaders.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Baltimore's status as a "real" city within commuting distance of that den of bureaucrats, Washington, D.C., serves it in good stead this weekend as the Democratic Leadership Council brings its "national conversation" to town for the second year in a row. But more than the city will be on display for this influential group of Democrats. They will also be taking a close look at the event's co-leaders, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Mayor Martin O'Malley, because this meeting is considered an incubator for new leaders in the party.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Baltimore's status as a "real" city within commuting distance of that den of bureaucrats, Washington, D.C., serves it in good stead this weekend as the Democratic Leadership Council brings its "national conversation" to town for the second year in a row. But more than the city will be on display for this influential group of Democrats. They will also be taking a close look at the event's co-leaders, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Mayor Martin O'Malley, because this meeting is considered an incubator for new leaders in the party.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore will be the featured guests at a gathering of the Democratic Leadership Council in Baltimore next month, the group announced yesterday. The centrist DLC's "national conversation" is expected to attract more than 150 Democratic officials from around the country to discuss issues. Clinton, one of the early leaders of the DLC, is to participate in an interactive discussion on the Internet with British Prime Minister Tony Blair July 14. Organizers said about 50,000 Internet users will be able to log on with the two leaders.
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