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By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- Mohair sweaters, long gray skirts and Minnie Driver. That's what the first round of fall designer collections in New York had in common.Those fuzzy, scratchy mohair concoctions that were a major theme in Europe are dominating the New York runways. So are skirts that cover much more than the knee. Gray is the most popular color, and Minnie Driver has been seated in every front row. Fortunately, she doesn't seem to mind posing endlessly for the paparazzi.Yet even with these similarities, New York's designers are showing some individuality as the fall shows, which continue through Friday, get under way.Donna Karan offered unusual fabrics and interesting cuts in an innovative collection for DKNY.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2000
This is probably the busiest week of the year for Elizabeth Quill, who runs the mutuels department at Laurel and Pimlico race courses. Quill, a Laurel resident, will report to work on Preakness day around 3: 30 a.m. and call it quits around 9 p.m. Quill, whose uncle, Sunshine Calvert, trained champions In Reality and Unbridled, can't tell you what steed to bet on. But she can tell you what she'll wear for her long day: "Most likely, a pair of Ralph Lauren...
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
You'll know Kenny Saenz by his shades.The bronze-framed specs festooned with hardware supplies are definite attention getters, but so are his DKNY ensembles and his straight-arrow suits.The 38-year-old hair designer who works at D.K. Salon and lives in Ednor Gardens doesn't like to be pegged to one look, preferring instead a more free-wheeling fashion approach.Says Mr. Saenz, "I even wear my hair 10 different ways."How would you sum up your style?Classic with a twist. The twist could be whatever I'm in the mood for. The style might range from artsy to even sometimes boring.
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By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- Mohair sweaters, long gray skirts and Minnie Driver. That's what the first round of fall designer collections in New York had in common.Those fuzzy, scratchy mohair concoctions that were a major theme in Europe are dominating the New York runways. So are skirts that cover much more than the knee. Gray is the most popular color, and Minnie Driver has been seated in every front row. Fortunately, she doesn't seem to mind posing endlessly for the paparazzi.Yet even with these similarities, New York's designers are showing some individuality as the fall shows, which continue through Friday, get under way.Donna Karan offered unusual fabrics and interesting cuts in an innovative collection for DKNY.
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By Anne-Marie Schiro and Anne-Marie Schiro,New York Times News Service | March 18, 1992
Spring may be just around the corner, but spring clothes have been in the stores for several weeks. In some cases, in and out of the stores. Sales are picking up, several retailers say, at least among women who are interested in fashion.These dedicated shoppers have been snapping up examples of the latest trends, things like long skirts, vests, skinny pants, menswear suits and shirts, poor-boy sweaters and anything that s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-s."Ask me what's selling, and I'll tell you long skirts," said Kalman Ruttenstein, Bloomingdale's senior vice president for fashion direction.
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By Catherine Cook | April 11, 1991
Some of this spring's best sales have come as surprises."In a season when customers were supposed to be wanting to buy safe because of the economy and everything, we found what they really wanted was something new," says Nancy Chistolini, vice president of creative merchandising at Hecht's. "They didn't want a basic jacket, but one with fancier buttons or braid or trim."And I won't say the unitard was a blowout, but at $48 apiece, they did very well for something that wasn't a necessity. The black stirrup pants really took off, and I wish we had more of them.
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By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 30, 1992
If you want to try Donna Karan New York, the fragrance, you could wait until September, fly to New York and buy a bottle at the one retail store -- as yet unannounced -- that will sell the fragrance until January.Or you could pick up the phone today and order a sample vial by calling (800) 647-7474 any time.And so Donna's dynasty grows.Come October, you'll be able to buy Donna Karan Intimates (read: underwear) at stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. Already, Ms. Karan offers women's clothes from three different collections -- Donna Karan New York, DKNY, DKNY Jeans -- as well as menswear, hosiery, eye wear, jewelry and shoes.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2000
This is probably the busiest week of the year for Elizabeth Quill, who runs the mutuels department at Laurel and Pimlico race courses. Quill, a Laurel resident, will report to work on Preakness day around 3: 30 a.m. and call it quits around 9 p.m. Quill, whose uncle, Sunshine Calvert, trained champions In Reality and Unbridled, can't tell you what steed to bet on. But she can tell you what she'll wear for her long day: "Most likely, a pair of Ralph Lauren...
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By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 29, 1992
If you want to try Donna Karan New York, the fragrance, you could wait until September, fly to New York and buy a bottle at the one retail store -- as yet unannounced -- that will sell the fragrance until January.Or you could pick up the phone today and order a sample vial by calling 1-800-647-7474 any time.And so Donna's dynasty grows.Come October, you'll be able to buy Donna Karan Intimates (read: underwear) at stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. Already, Ms. Karan offers women's clothes from three different collections -- Donna Karan New York, DKNY, DKNY Jeans -- as well as menswear, hosiery, eye wear, jewelry and shoes.
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By Los Angeles Daily NewsBoston GlobeNew York Times News ServiceEdited by Catherine Cook | November 14, 1991
Cowboy coutureConsistently, the European fashion designers seem to be the ones who forge the trends that American designers interpret into more wearable versions of clothing.But many of the most successful designers have ignored Europe and started looking for inspiration from honest-to-goodness Americans, the hard-working kind.So perhaps it's no fluke that New York designer Donna Karan's latest spring sportswear collection, DKNY, looks like something derived from a California cattle ranch that hired Thelma and Louise.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
You'll know Kenny Saenz by his shades.The bronze-framed specs festooned with hardware supplies are definite attention getters, but so are his DKNY ensembles and his straight-arrow suits.The 38-year-old hair designer who works at D.K. Salon and lives in Ednor Gardens doesn't like to be pegged to one look, preferring instead a more free-wheeling fashion approach.Says Mr. Saenz, "I even wear my hair 10 different ways."How would you sum up your style?Classic with a twist. The twist could be whatever I'm in the mood for. The style might range from artsy to even sometimes boring.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Fashion Editor | November 2, 1993
New York -- Top American designers, not always of a ccooperative mind, have kissed air and made up, and are showing their spring collections under one tent.Under the umbrellas of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA), thousands of buyers and press are huddling together in harmony in two circus-sized tents set up in the Bryant Park grounds of the New York Public Library.It is the American fashion industry's first effort to centralize the seasonal collections to attract the international attention that Paris and Milan have taken as their due.In the past, the fashion pack was herded from cramped hot showroom to drafty lofts, risking falling plaster, jammed freight elevators and Manhattan traffic for a look at designer offerings.
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 30, 1992
If you want to try Donna Karan New York, the fragrance, you could wait until September, fly to New York and buy a bottle at the one retail store -- as yet unannounced -- that will sell the fragrance until January.Or you could pick up the phone today and order a sample vial by calling (800) 647-7474 any time.And so Donna's dynasty grows.Come October, you'll be able to buy Donna Karan Intimates (read: underwear) at stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. Already, Ms. Karan offers women's clothes from three different collections -- Donna Karan New York, DKNY, DKNY Jeans -- as well as menswear, hosiery, eye wear, jewelry and shoes.
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 29, 1992
If you want to try Donna Karan New York, the fragrance, you could wait until September, fly to New York and buy a bottle at the one retail store -- as yet unannounced -- that will sell the fragrance until January.Or you could pick up the phone today and order a sample vial by calling 1-800-647-7474 any time.And so Donna's dynasty grows.Come October, you'll be able to buy Donna Karan Intimates (read: underwear) at stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. Already, Ms. Karan offers women's clothes from three different collections -- Donna Karan New York, DKNY, DKNY Jeans -- as well as menswear, hosiery, eye wear, jewelry and shoes.
FEATURES
By Anne-Marie Schiro and Anne-Marie Schiro,New York Times News Service | March 18, 1992
Spring may be just around the corner, but spring clothes have been in the stores for several weeks. In some cases, in and out of the stores. Sales are picking up, several retailers say, at least among women who are interested in fashion.These dedicated shoppers have been snapping up examples of the latest trends, things like long skirts, vests, skinny pants, menswear suits and shirts, poor-boy sweaters and anything that s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-s."Ask me what's selling, and I'll tell you long skirts," said Kalman Ruttenstein, Bloomingdale's senior vice president for fashion direction.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily NewsBoston GlobeNew York Times News ServiceEdited by Catherine Cook | November 14, 1991
Cowboy coutureConsistently, the European fashion designers seem to be the ones who forge the trends that American designers interpret into more wearable versions of clothing.But many of the most successful designers have ignored Europe and started looking for inspiration from honest-to-goodness Americans, the hard-working kind.So perhaps it's no fluke that New York designer Donna Karan's latest spring sportswear collection, DKNY, looks like something derived from a California cattle ranch that hired Thelma and Louise.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook and Catherine Cook,Fashion Editor | November 29, 1990
DON'T WORRY if you can't seem to squeeze into your favorite blue jeans on the weekends anymore. For now, at least, the fashion world has relegated blue jeans to the back of the closet.Instead, just pull on a pair of black stretch leggings. That little bit of added Lycra will smooth out any extra pounds and the long tunic sweaters happen to be not only the latest in fashion, but also very handy for camouflaging pesky bulges.The switch from blue jeans into leggings is just one of several changes going on in weekend wear.
FEATURES
By Robin Givhan and Robin Givhan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 6, 1991
That sad voice in the background? The one wailing against the cry of the harmonica? That's the denim purist weeping over the state of the blues.Denim the fabric of casual-is-best blue jean lovers has gone designer.Not only is it no longer necessarily blue, it doesn't even have to be in the form of jeans, it doesn't automatically mean playtime and it's certainly no longer cheap."Denim is coming out like the new No. 1 dress code on the market, in the whole social circle," says menswear designer Ender Murat, who introduced his first line of denim for spring.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | August 1, 1991
Oh no, not again. It's the beginning of one of those nasty, in-between times during which you're not sure what the season is -- let alone what to wear.Should you wear the short, black linen skirt with the white jacket that screams "summer" or rush out and buy a long-sleeved, nubbly jacket in autumnal burnt orange?How can you possibly guess right when the store windows are all filled with fall fashions and it's still 90 degrees outside?Don't despair. Clothing for these peculiar, in-between times -- dubbed "transition" by the fashion world -- is becoming easier to find and easier to wear.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | April 11, 1991
Some of this spring's best sales have come as surprises."In a season when customers were supposed to be wanting to buy safe because of the economy and everything, we found what they really wanted was something new," says Nancy Chistolini, vice president of creative merchandising at Hecht's. "They didn't want a basic jacket, but one with fancier buttons or braid or trim."And I won't say the unitard was a blowout, but at $48 apiece, they did very well for something that wasn't a necessity. The black stirrup pants really took off, and I wish we had more of them.
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