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NEWS
February 26, 2010
The death of Hannah Wheeling, a valued Department of Juvenile Services ("DJS") employee, has sent a shockwave of sadness and concern through DJS and communities across Maryland. Understandably, people want answers as to how this tragedy occurred and how it could have been prevented. I assure you that there is no one who wants answers more than I do. But, like everyone else, I have to wait to get my answers. Why? Because the Maryland State Police and local authorities are still investigating a criminal matter that will hopefully enable justice to prevail.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
A 29-year-old Department of Juvenile Services employee and her 39-year-old boyfriend have been arrested after shots were fired Thursday night in the parking lot of a youth detention facility in Baltimore County, state police said. Police said an employee reported that he was leaving the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in the 9700 block of Old Harford Road about 10:30 p.m. when several shots were fired and a car sped off. Troopers learned that the vehicle belonged to Hickey School employee Mia C. Henson and was being driven by her boyfriend, Jermaine A. Conway.
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NEWS
May 9, 2005
IT'S HARD TO ARGUE with the latest plan to tinker with Maryland's lumbering juvenile justice system. After all, we've seen much of it before: Calls for smaller facilities, more mental and physical health care before and during incarceration, and more and better training for staff at the Department of Juvenile Services have come from advocates, legislators, this newspaper and DJS itself. Some specifics, though, are worth attention - and action. The 10-point plan offered by Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley reflects lessons learned during the city's running of such services as Operation Safe Kids, an intensive, cooperative intervention program for juveniles in greatest danger of being shot or shooting someone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Nas, the veteran New York rapper, will perform on the main stage of May 17's Preakness InfieldFest, the Maryland Jockey Club announced today. "Royals" singer Lorde, previously announced, is the other headliner. Electronic dance music DJs Frank Walker and Glenn Morrison will open the main stage. Nas is currently celebrating the 20th anniversary of his debut album, "Illmatic. " It remains one of the most beloved rap recordings to date, thanks in large part to Nas' fluid, thoughtful and poetic observations of his upbringing in Queens.
NEWS
April 15, 2005
THIS YEAR'S budget crisis at the state Department of Juvenile Services isn't unexpected, isn't the first and won't be the last. It could be the next-to-last, though, if DJS and its handler, the Ehrlich administration, come clean on how much the system really costs. The department has had a structural deficit for years. It spends far more than budgeted to place delinquent youngsters in group homes and in far-flung private facilities to give them the specialized care they need. While we agree with the department, the administration, the advocates and most of the nation that treating children closer to home, often in smaller settings, is preferable, until DJS builds up that new infrastructure, it has to make do with what it has. That means it will continue to spend a great deal on "out-of-home placements."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | November 14, 1996
Because trip-hop is not band music, some people think it will never succeed in a concert format. As they see it, how exciting could it be to watch a couple of DJs?Obviously, these folks have never seen the Chemical Brothers. Although this British duo -- Ed Simons and Tom Rowlands -- work with the usual assortment of samples and loops, they approach trip-hop with a rock and roll attitude, emphasizing aggression as much as groove. In fact, the group's current single, "Setting Sun," quotes "Tomorrow Never Knows" and boasts a vocal from Oasis' Noel Gallagher.
NEWS
April 7, 2005
MARYLAND'S beleaguered juvenile justice system needs more money, more transparency, better focus on the basics and a greater sense of urgency. A revised House bill would help with the last three, as well as enforce the idea that it also is the legislature's duty to ensure that the state helps, not harms, its wards. It is not acceptable, for example, that the Department of Juvenile Services has been reminded repeatedly, for years, to fix the broken locks on cell doors at the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
A 29-year-old Department of Juvenile Services employee and her 39-year-old boyfriend have been arrested after shots were fired Thursday night in the parking lot of a youth detention facility in Baltimore County, state police said. Police said an employee reported that he was leaving the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in the 9700 block of Old Harford Road about 10:30 p.m. when several shots were fired and a car sped off. Troopers learned that the vehicle belonged to Hickey School employee Mia C. Henson and was being driven by her boyfriend, Jermaine A. Conway.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011
"It's raw, simple, almost primal music that is meant to be the soundtrack to the time of your life. " That's DJ James Nasty talking about Baltimore club music. He's a longtime fan. But for an upcoming gig, he's been researching it and other historic Baltimore sounds more meticulously than he would for his weekly Mustache party at the Ottobar . The online magazine Gutter asked him and DJ Benny Stixx to come up with a dance party where they'd spin only Baltimore music. The two will finally show off their set lists tonight at the Windup Space at a party where they'll play songs that stretch as far back as the 1940s.
NEWS
March 31, 2005
AT THE RELATIVELY new juvenile holding tank at the Baltimore Juvenile Justice Center, where the staff is supposedly freshly trained in best practices and state law, children have been badly, apparently illegally, treated. At the well-established Alfred D. Noyes Children's Center in Rockville, there are new reports of the old, familiar "fight clubs," as well as allegations that a staffer ran a gang -- with shame and physical abuse as hazing -- in one of the units. Apparently, not much has changed as the Ehrlich administration rolls into its third year of juvenile justice "reform."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Steve Aoki can barely contain his excitement over the tour he has orchestrated. "This lineup is phenomenal," said Aoki, the dance music DJ and producer. "We've only done four shows so far, and it feels just like a festival with all these different artists. " This type of passion is what helped the 35-year old producer rise to the top of the world of electronic dance music in recent years. Performing an average of 250 shows annually, Aoki has galvanized the scene and won over fans with his upbeat house music and stage antics, such as crowd-surfing and launching birthday cakes at concertgoers.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
The state Board of Public Works' vote Wednesday to allow the privately operated Silver Oak Academy juvenile treatment center in Carroll County to double in capacity is regrettable not only because it violates the state's own policy of limiting such facilities to no more than 48 beds but because it sets a troubling precedent for how the state will handle future shortages of treatment slots for juveniles. If the goal is to help troubled youngsters get their lives back on track, the state would have done far better if it had accelerated long-delayed plans to build two new, smaller facilities in Baltimore City and Prince George's County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Citing numerous accounts of neighborhood disturbances, the Baltimore Board of Liquor License Commissioners ruled not to renew the license of the Museum Restaurant and Lounge in Mount Vernon after four hours of deliberation Thursday night. Liquor board chairman Steve Fogleman said management of the Museum - which set up in the former Brass Elephant space - presented the business as an “upscale restaurant” when applying for the license, but it was in reality a nightclub. He refuted Museum owner Walter Webb's claims from earlier this month that Webb had been unfairly targeted because he is one of the few African American business owners in Mount Vernon.
FEATURES
By Jamie Bacon, For The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Weddings, along with styles, are constantly changing. Wedding bands used to be very popular in the last generation but lately DJs are the trend. As a very indecisive person, I can tell you that I am really struggling with this decision.  The music and entertainment of your wedding can really make or break the whole celebration. There will be music playing for the ceremony, cocktail hour and, of course, the reception. If it doesn't turn out how you hope it to, it could affect the guests and whether they have a good time or not. If the DJ only plays slow songs, some of the single people may not want to dance.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
The independent watchdog agency that oversees Maryland's Department of Juvenile Services recently released a report showing the state made important progress last year toward improving conditions for youths held in its three largest juvenile detention facilities. That's good news given the years of problems the system has encountered with overcrowding, incidents of violence, high staff turnover and aging facilities. Now the state needs to build on those gains by replicating the successful programs at its largest institutions in smaller facilities statewide.
NEWS
January 7, 2013
State officials were right last week to postpone approval of a Department of Juvenile Services contract to increase the capacity of the privately owned Silver Oak Academy juvenile residential treatment facility in Carroll County. The department wants to double the number of beds there, from 48 to 96, in order to reduce the backlog of youthful offenders awaiting treatment in overcrowded lockups. Getting more troubled young people out of detention centers and into treatment where they can receive the help they need is certainly a worthy goal.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1996
Rock and roll is here to stay. Unless you're in the habit of listening to WGRX-FM (100.7), where its days are definitely numbered.Reacting to persistently low ratings that have left it one of the least-heard stations on Baltimore's FM dial, management at the modern rock station has fired its program director and its six disc jockeys in preparation for a major format change.General Manager Roy Deutschman said he is not ready to announce the format, but confirmed it would be announced soon, and would have nothing to do with rock.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
Steve "Phlash" Phelps and Kurt Gilchrist are winging their way through the continental 48 states in just 14 days, making stops throughout in a customized Cadillac SUV as they broadcast songs from the '60s and '70s on XM Satellite radio. Yesterday was Day 2, and they pulled up mid-afternoon in Owings Mills, at a Tweeter electronics store where XM-compatible equipment can be found. The SUV was covered in logos for the satellite radio service and some of its 101 channels. A red transmitter disk sat atop the SUV, resembling nothing so much as a misplaced giant clown nose.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
When you become the most decorated Olympian of all time what do you do --  head to Disneyland? Not Michael Phelps. He's going to Atlantic City. Phelps will be headlining a pool party at Harrah's Resort on Sept. 22. And from the looks of photos of past "Pool After Dark" parties on the resort's website , these things can get pretty wild. You think you can handle hanging with the king of chlorine? Well, all you have to do is head over to the New Jersey boardwalk and pony up $20 -- that's what admission costs.
NEWS
May 29, 2012
For years, lawmakers and child advocates have been urging Maryland's Department of Juvenile Services to speed up the process of getting troubled youths out of the state's overcrowded juvenile lockups and into residential treatment facilities where they can get help. And year after year, the answer is always the same: There aren't enough treatment slots for all the kids who need them. So it was already more than a twice-told tale when DJS Secretary Sam Abed appeared before the state Board of Public Works recently and said he is considering expanding the size of some privately run residential treatment programs because of the shortage of beds at state facilities.
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