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NEWS
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 7, 1993
Over the years, jazz has produced musicians who were brilliant players and musicians who were likable popularizers. But only a handful have ever managed to be both, and few of them could balance creativity and charm as well as Dizzy Gillespie did.Mr. Gillespie died in his sleep yesterday at Englewood Hospital in New Jersey, where he had been treated for pancreatic cancer. was 75.He was clearly one of the giants of jazz. Along with saxophonist Charlie "Yardbird" Parker, he was at the forefront of the be-bop revolution.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 9, 2007
Amonthly film series highlighting African-American jazz musicians and their contributions to popular culture begins Tuesday at An die Musik Live, 409 N. Charles St., with Cartoons That Sing. The night will feature animation going back to the years before World War II, and will be replete with music from Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie (in 1962's Oscar-winning short, The Hole), Ella Fitzgerald, the Mills Brothers, Roberta Flack and others. Future series offerings include Baltimore Musicians in Film and Song (March 13)
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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1998
Jeanie Bryson's jazz is sultry, smooth and sexy. On New Year's Eve, she'll be swinging and swaying at her First Night Annapolis debut.Bryson, daughter of legendary jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, is one of nearly 50 acts that will entertain on festival stages at this year's celebration.Bryson, who has established herself as a jazz vocalist in an age when critics have lamented the scarcity of them, is expected to be one of the most popular draws at the festival. Organizers have planned second-chance tickets, which give late-comers toearly performances priority for seats at later 45-minute sets at the Banneker-Douglass Museum.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | October 6, 2006
Wilde Lake High School senior Eliza Fishbein describes herself as "excited" and "giddy" about the school jazz band's scheduled performances this weekend with renowned trombonist Slide Hampton. "It's just so cool that no matter what level you're playing at, [jazz musicians] are willing to encourage you," she said. Hampton, who has made music with some of the best-known names in jazz -- including Dizzy Gillespie, Max Roach, Maynard Ferguson and others -- seems genuinely enthusiastic about his weekend collaborators, as well.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1997
Renowned saxophone player Ron Holloway walks around the basement of his townhouse in Glen Burnie but doesn't point out to a visitor the posters hailing his years playing with jazz legend Dizzy Gillespie or the album covers going back through three decades of performances of everything from rock to funk to traditional jazz."
NEWS
January 8, 1993
Some lovers of traditional jazz and swing never quite forgave Dizzy Gillespie for his role in developing the dissonant style of be-bop.Louis Armstrong, for example, accused the rival trumpeter of simply playing wrong notes. But few musicians in the relatively short history of jazz showed such an unfettered stylistic versatility and creative vitality as Gillespie, who died Wednesday at the age of 75."Watching him was like watching a magician," singer Joe Williams said about Dizzy's mastery of a stilted trumpet and his humorous clowning on stages throughout the world.
NEWS
January 11, 1993
IT WAS one of Dizzy Gillespie's last appearances in Baltimore, and true to Diz, the jazz trumpet genius who died Jan. 6, it was magical. The evening started, however, on a sour note.On a Sunday about 10 years ago, Gillespie brought a small band to the auditorium of Baltimore's Dunbar High School. At showtime, a third of the hall was filled. The crowd, if you want to call it that, would get no bigger by the end of the night.For a musician of his stature, it was a sad, embarrassing and insulting turn-out.
NEWS
April 30, 1993
Student musicians and vocalists will pay tribute to pianist Count Basie and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie on "Jazz Nite," Western Maryland College's end-of-semester evening of live jazz Thursday.The concert, scheduled for 8 p.m. in the Decker College Center Forum, will be free and refreshments will be provided.Players and singers from three campus jazz groups will be led by "Jazz Nite" organizer Bo Eckard, a music lecturer at the college.The WMC Jazz Ensemble, a 21-piece group featuring some of the best musicians from the college and area high schools, will offer several Count Basie numbers in classic big band arrangements augmented by French horns, a tuba and contrabass clarinet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 11, 1994
These days, jazz is crawling with would-be prodigies, young musicians who have albums in the stores before they're even out of their teens. The trouble is that too many of them mistake proficiency for profundity, and end up trying to set their own course before they're really sure of what it is they have to say.That's one reason it's a relief to come across Ron Holloway. Because unlike so many players, who would cut an album of their own at the earliest opportunity, Holloway waited for almost two decades before recording "Slanted," his solo debut.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Contributing Writer | October 23, 1992
What goes around comes around, and that's just fine with tenor sax player Ron Holloway of Glen Burnie.For years, he has built his career partly by asking to sit in, or work, with musicians as diverse as unconventional rocker Root Boy Slim and jazz innovator Dizzy Gillespie.But after Saturday Oct. 31, when the Ron Holloway Group makes its Annapolis debut at the Maryland Inn's King of France Tavern, musicians probably will be asking to sit in with him.Actually, "they've already started asking," the 39 year-old musician said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | March 16, 2006
She was sharp in heels and black leather pants that hugged her curves. The haircut was sassy: golden blond, cut in layers, tapered in the back. As the band kicked into a bluesy groove, she closed her eyes, moaned into the microphone and patted her rocking hips in time with the beat. That was about four years ago at the Blue Note in New York. And Karrin Allyson, one of the best vocalists working in jazz today, was on that night, delivering subtle blues numbers, airy ballads and Brazilian love songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Bor and By Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff | May 29, 2005
Dizzy: The Life and Times of John Birks Gillespie By Donald L. Maggin. HarperEntertainment, 423 pages, $26.32. Dizzy Gillespie, the trumpeter who would forever become associated with the birth of bebop, acquired his nickname as a teenager when he prowled Philadelphia's saloons and jazz clubs toting a $15 horn in a paper bag while dressed in shaggy pin-striped suits from a local thrift shop. The older musicians who affectionately applied the label couldn't have foreseen how apt it was -- that the wacky prodigy would soon be flicking spitballs behind the back of bandleader Cab Calloway and lighting matches between the toes of dozing bandmates.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 13, 2003
As you examine the lines and movements of a Romare Bearden work - Drum Chorus (1986), Slapping Seventh Avenue With the Sole of My Shoes (1981) and others - you can hear the music. You can hear the horns ebb, flow and soar, the drums roll, the voices wail and explode. No other visual artist captured with paint and photographs the essence, the funk, the soul of the African-American experience the way Bearden did. Like the jazz that inspired him, the paintings swing - the rhythms aflame in oils, watercolors and collages.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
Vernon L. Welsh, a founder of the Left Bank Jazz Society whose recordings of the society's Famous Ballroom concerts captured some of the greatest names in jazz, died Thursday of dementia at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation Center in Southwest Baltimore. He was 83. Mr. Welsh and Benny Kearse, who died in 1999, established the Left Bank Jazz Society in 1964. The society not only showcased local jazz musicians, but brought such legendary jazz artists as Stan Getz, Julian "Cannonball" Adderly, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, Dave Brubeck, Duke Ellington and Maynard Ferguson to Baltimore, where they performed to sold-out crowds at the Famous Ballroom on Charles Street.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2001
Propelled by the percussive rhythms of timbales and congas, claves and guiros, Latin jazz trumpeter Arturo Sandoval hits stratospheric double-C notes so easily he really ought to be running the Star Wars anti-missile program. A powerhouse trumpet player, Sandoval came burning out of Cuba with Paquito D'Rivera, the brilliant saxophone player, Chucho Valdes, the virtuoso pianist, and their Irakere band in 1977. He was playing with Dizzy Gillespie's United Nations Orchestra when he sought political asylum in Rome in 1990.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 24, 2000
Until you've actually heard his music, it's almost hard to believe a figure like Charlie Parker ever could have existed. Like Paul Bunyon or Staggerlee, he somehow seems more myth than man. His saga has all the expected elements, from his humble beginnings in prohibition-era Kansas City, to his death, bloated and tragic, in New York at the age of 34, to his deification by generations of jazz fans. "Hero With a Thousand Faces" author Joseph Campbell couldn't have plotted a more perfect path for a jazz hero to walk.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1998
Joenell Fisher, a Baltimore native who sang in area jazz clubs for nearly two decades and recorded numerous songs, including one with Dizzy Gillespie, died Thursday at Union Memorial Hospital of pneumonia.Ms. Fisher, 51, had a rich, earthy voice and an engaging stage presence that entertained local audiences from the late 1960s until she stopped performing in 1992."She didn't just come out on a stool and sit on it and sing," said Essie Cade, owner of the old Cade's Country Club in East Baltimore, where Ms. Fisher sang about once a week from the mid- to late 1980s.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 9, 1993
They didn't come any smoother than Billy Eckstine.That he was a great singer goes without saying -- few baritones have ever equaled the sort of warm tone and mellifluous phrasing that was his stock-in-trade. But there was more to it than that, for Eckstine, who died in his hometown of Pittsburgh Monday at age 78, was a smoothie in every sense of the term.Elegant and urbane, with a sense of style that went well beyond the cut of his clothes, he seemed born to the role of matinee idol. His image bespoke a suave sensuality, combining crooning intimacy with rakish good looks; imagine a cross between Frank Sinatra and Billy Dee Williams, and you'll have a sense of just how powerful a presence he was.No wonder, then, that it was he who became America's first cross-over pop star.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2000
My favorite moment in "The Source: The Story of the Beats and the Beat Generation" finds Ken Kesey explaining how heavy drugs were used by him and some of his fellow writers to radically alter perception so that they might see the world in new ways and then record those visions for their readers. But it's different today, the author of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" says. "Now we just get up, drink a lot of coffee and do the best we can." "The Source," a 90-minute film by Chuck Workman on the ideological foundations of the Beat movement, is one of the smartest and most seamlessly crafted documentaries I have seen this year.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1998
Jeanie Bryson's jazz is sultry, smooth and sexy. On New Year's Eve, she'll be swinging and swaying at her First Night Annapolis debut.Bryson, daughter of legendary jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, is one of nearly 50 acts that will entertain on festival stages at this year's celebration.Bryson, who has established herself as a jazz vocalist in an age when critics have lamented the scarcity of them, is expected to be one of the most popular draws at the festival. Organizers have planned second-chance tickets, which give late-comers toearly performances priority for seats at later 45-minute sets at the Banneker-Douglass Museum.
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