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By SYLVIA BADGER | December 6, 1992
When Dixie Carter was in town last weekend to sing with the BSO, the "Designing Women" star was followed by a crew from "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous."They were shooting footage for a segment that will focus on Carter's singing career, which she juggles in addition to her TV appearances as Julia Sugarbaker. The versatile Carter travels around the country performing with orchestras as well as at New York City's posh Cafe Carlisle.Music is also part of Carter's home life, and her favorite recordings -- Luciano Pavarotti, Frank Sinatra and Waylon Jennings -- are as varied as her career.
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NEWS
April 12, 2010
DIXIE CARTER, 70 Star of 'Designing Women' "Designing Women" star Dixie Carter, whose Southern charm and natural beauty won her a host of television roles, has died at age 70. Carter died Saturday morning, according to publicist Steve Rohr, who represents Carter and her husband, actor Hal Holbrook. He declined to disclose the cause of death or where she died. Carter lived with Holbrook in the Los Angeles area. "This has been a terrible blow to our family," Holbrook said in a written statement.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 9, 1998
Purity, says a character in Oscar Wilde's "A Woman of No Importance," "is the one subject of really national importance." The line draws a big laugh in director Michael Kahn's production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre.An even bigger laugh comes a few lines later, when the same character adds, "The growing influence of women is the one reassuring thing in our political life. Women are always on the side of morality, public and private."But witty -- and surprisingly topical -- as such quips may be, it is the heartfelt emotion at the core of Kahn's stylish production that grants substance to the style.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 9, 1998
Purity, says a character in Oscar Wilde's "A Woman of No Importance," "is the one subject of really national importance." The line draws a big laugh in director Michael Kahn's production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre.An even bigger laugh comes a few lines later, when the same character adds, "The growing influence of women is the one reassuring thing in our political life. Women are always on the side of morality, public and private."But witty -- and surprisingly topical -- as such quips may be, it is the heartfelt emotion at the core of Kahn's stylish production that grants substance to the style.
FEATURES
September 22, 1997
Figuring the best way to go up against "Monday Night Football" is to go after the women, NBC presents a lineup of sitcoms with female stars, all having their season premieres tonight.Season two of "Suddenly Susan" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m.) begins with Susan (Brooke Shields) heading off on a romantic getaway with Cooper (Brian McNamara), while Jack (Judd Nelson) has a strange dream about her with bygone stars of the silver screen.Gwen and Terry (Sharon Lawrence and Leah Rimini) return for a second season of "Fired Up" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | November 22, 1992
If Dixie Carter ever made a list of life's most embarrassing moments, near the top would be her debut with the Atlanta Symphony last year.Her performance wasn't the problem; her fingernails were.Walking onto the stage -- her shapely legs peeking out from her dress, her false eyelashes firmly in place -- she was ready to play the chanteuse. Or so she thought.Then she glanced down, and it hit her."I had only painted the fingernails on one hand," she says. "I'd forgotten to finish. I couldn't have apologized more to the audience.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
DIXIE CARTER, 70 Star of 'Designing Women' "Designing Women" star Dixie Carter, whose Southern charm and natural beauty won her a host of television roles, has died at age 70. Carter died Saturday morning, according to publicist Steve Rohr, who represents Carter and her husband, actor Hal Holbrook. He declined to disclose the cause of death or where she died. Carter lived with Holbrook in the Los Angeles area. "This has been a terrible blow to our family," Holbrook said in a written statement.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 14, 1993
The news from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is both good and bad.Yesterday the BSO announced that the campaign for its annual fund for the 1992-93 season exceeded its $3.3 million goal by $50,000. It was the second year in a drive to take the fund -- which helps pay the orchestra's annual operating expenses -- to $4 million by 1994.The bad news is that the $50,000 is less than the orchestra lost -- probably well in excess of $100,000 -- when it lost 1,200 subscribers to its pops series this season (dropping from 5,999 renewals last year)
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 10, 1993
Bon Appetit editors-at-large, Ned Read and Zack Hanle, spent most of last week in Baltimore gathering material for a destination article on our fair city.If all goes well, the story, which will include comments about food served at Phillips Harborplace, Paolo's, Windows at the Stouffer Harborplace Hotel, Hampton's at Harbor Court and the Chart House, will be published in the spring.Gil Stottler of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association played tour guide for the visitors and said this is a real coup for Baltimore's tourism business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 3, 1998
There's been a resurgence of interest in Oscar Wilde lately - from the off-Broadway hit "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde" to the Stephen Fry movie "Wilde." Not to be left out, Washington's Shakespeare Theatre is producing one of the playwright's less frequently revived comedies, "A Woman of No Importance," currently in previews and opening Tuesday.Under Michael Kahn's direction, designing woman Dixie Carter stars as Mrs. Arbuthnot, a woman with a secret. Most recently, Carter appeared on Broadway as Maria Callas in Terrence McNally's "Master Class."
FEATURES
September 22, 1997
Figuring the best way to go up against "Monday Night Football" is to go after the women, NBC presents a lineup of sitcoms with female stars, all having their season premieres tonight.Season two of "Suddenly Susan" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m.) begins with Susan (Brooke Shields) heading off on a romantic getaway with Cooper (Brian McNamara), while Jack (Judd Nelson) has a strange dream about her with bygone stars of the silver screen.Gwen and Terry (Sharon Lawrence and Leah Rimini) return for a second season of "Fired Up" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 14, 1993
The news from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is both good and bad.Yesterday the BSO announced that the campaign for its annual fund for the 1992-93 season exceeded its $3.3 million goal by $50,000. It was the second year in a drive to take the fund -- which helps pay the orchestra's annual operating expenses -- to $4 million by 1994.The bad news is that the $50,000 is less than the orchestra lost -- probably well in excess of $100,000 -- when it lost 1,200 subscribers to its pops series this season (dropping from 5,999 renewals last year)
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 10, 1993
Bon Appetit editors-at-large, Ned Read and Zack Hanle, spent most of last week in Baltimore gathering material for a destination article on our fair city.If all goes well, the story, which will include comments about food served at Phillips Harborplace, Paolo's, Windows at the Stouffer Harborplace Hotel, Hampton's at Harbor Court and the Chart House, will be published in the spring.Gil Stottler of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association played tour guide for the visitors and said this is a real coup for Baltimore's tourism business.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | December 6, 1992
When Dixie Carter was in town last weekend to sing with the BSO, the "Designing Women" star was followed by a crew from "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous."They were shooting footage for a segment that will focus on Carter's singing career, which she juggles in addition to her TV appearances as Julia Sugarbaker. The versatile Carter travels around the country performing with orchestras as well as at New York City's posh Cafe Carlisle.Music is also part of Carter's home life, and her favorite recordings -- Luciano Pavarotti, Frank Sinatra and Waylon Jennings -- are as varied as her career.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | November 22, 1992
If Dixie Carter ever made a list of life's most embarrassing moments, near the top would be her debut with the Atlanta Symphony last year.Her performance wasn't the problem; her fingernails were.Walking onto the stage -- her shapely legs peeking out from her dress, her false eyelashes firmly in place -- she was ready to play the chanteuse. Or so she thought.Then she glanced down, and it hit her."I had only painted the fingernails on one hand," she says. "I'd forgotten to finish. I couldn't have apologized more to the audience.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 15, 1992
A rare appearance by Harry Belafonte will be the highlight of an unusually glittering Baltimore Symphony Orchestra pops lineup next season.Belafonte, who will appear without the BSO, is one of the truly legendary figures in American popular music: He was the first singer to sell more than 1 million copies of an individual album, the first African-American to win an Emmy, and he was also a Tony winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center award.Other performers on the 1992-'93 roster, which the BSO released Wednesday, include the famed a cappella group the Swingle Singers, composer-conductor Henry Mancini, the Smothers Brothers comedy team and BSO music director David Zinman, who will lead the orchestra in music from "Porgy and Bess" and "Carmen Jones."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 14, 1992
A rare appearance by Harry Belafonte will be the highlight of an unusually glittering Baltimore Symphony Orchestra pops lineup next season.Belafonte, who will appear without the BSO, is one of the truly legendary figures in American popular music: He was the first singer to sell more than 1 million copies of an individual album, he was the first African-American to win an Emmy, and he was also a Tony winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center award.Other...
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