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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 17, 1991
NEW YORK -- Garrison Keillor has asked Ulla Skaerved, his wife of six years, for a divorce, according to the New York Daily News."Garrison Keillor has just given his wife a one-way ticket to Lake Wobegon," columnist Richard Johnson wrote.The paper reports that his new love, known only as Dorrit, hasung on Mr. Keillor's "American Radio Company of the Air" radio show and has been tutoring him in Danish, his wife's first language.A spokesman for the American Public Radio network said Friday that Mr. Keillor had issued a "no comment" on the matter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 10, 2014
Timothy Wheeler and Meredith Cohn 's article on lead-paint lawsuits underscores a much larger issue in Baltimore: Most lead-poisoned children live in poverty ( "Lead-paint lawsuits dogs Kennedy Krieger," June 7). Adverse childhood experiences such as community violence, discrimination, parental separation and divorce, incarceration and malnutrition are increasingly appreciated as circumstances that make children more vulnerable to environmental toxins like lead. Lead abatement doesn't completely remove lead from homes.
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NEWS
March 14, 2010
Benjamin A. Sifrit, convicted along with his wife of 10 years for murdering a couple in Ocean City in 2002, has filed for divorce on the grounds she is a "convicted felon." Radio station WTOP reported that Sifrit is seeking to divorce Erika Sifrit. Both are in prison after being convicted of murdering Joshua Ford and Martha Crutchley of Fairfax, Va. Acting as his own attorney, Sifrit cited Maryland Code, which says a court can grant a divorce on the grounds of a conviction of a felony or misdemeanor where the person has been sentenced to serve three years in prison.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
A judge ruled Wednesday that the divorce file of Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman must remain open to the public. Judge Diane O. Leasure, a retired Howard County judge, denied a motion by Neuman's attorney, Clara Martone Bereston, to seal the case. The motion was supported by attorney Leslie G. Billman, who represents Neuman's husband, Paul Volkman. Bereston and Billman argued that given Neuman's standing as a public official, details of the divorce might be reported in the media and repeated around town - potentially embarrassing the couple's two school-age children.
NEWS
March 13, 2010
A man who with his wife murdered a couple in Ocean City in 2002 has filed from divorce from her on the grounds she is a "convicted felon." Radio station WTOP reports Benjamin Sifrit has filed for divorce from Erika Sifrit. Both are in prison after being convicted of murdering Joshua Ford and Martha Crutchley of Fairfax, Va. Acting as his own attorney, Sifrit cited Maryland code that says a court can grant a divorce on the grounds of a conviction of a felony or misdemeanor where the person has been sentenced to serve three years in prison.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
If you thought there are few surprises left, here's one: In Maryland, you don't need to be divorced to be forced to pay alimony. So says Maryland's second-highest court. And just in case you're ready to accuse these judges of being activists bent on rewriting the law, history and common sense, the unanimous decision handed down late last month is steeped in historical precedent. Steeped in so much precedent, in fact, that the judges had to go back three centuries to references in English common law. Turns out that in 1777, when the Free State first started hearing cases involving alimony - or, as the current court put it, "simply a fancy name for separate maintenance" - this state's judges did not copy the ecclesiastical courts of England as closely as perhaps they should have.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
Jessica Port and Virginia Anne Cowan had settled on San Francisco as the place to turn their two-year engagement into a marriage, taking advantage of an opportunity in 2008 for same-sex couples to wed there. They flew from their home in the District of Columbia, had a courthouse ceremony and played tourist in the city for a few days. Two years later, the relationship in tatters, Port filed for divorce in Maryland, where she had bought a home. The women had already divided their belongings, didn't hire lawyers, and they remained on terms so amicable that "we sat right next to each other at the divorce hearing," Port recalled.
NEWS
October 29, 2013
Recently, the Vatican reaffirmed its position that divorced and remarried Catholics are barred from receiving communion. The solution then for a devout Catholic whose marriage ended in spousal abuse, infidelity, or otherwise through no fault on their own is just to live with a new partner without being remarried. But wait, there's a Catch 22: Doesn't that just constitute "living in sin?" The Vatican's position on remarrying makes about as much sense as its hypocritical position on homosexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bailey O'Malia | December 21, 2012
It's the finale! As in, "thank God it's finally over!" The women are still in Bimini, and now they're trapped by bad weather. Marysol suggests the women cleanse themselves of the bad things in their life. How does one do that? You take apart an expensive flower arrangement, get into the ocean, wipe a flower all over your body as you talk about your problems and then throw the flower in the water. The women all say very serious and thoughtful things.  It's really unusual.
SPORTS
August 27, 2010
Less stress a blessing Jeff Shain Orlando Sentinel It's not a question of whether Tiger Woods starts playing better, but how soon. And if Thursday's 65 to open the Barclays is an indicator, he may be on a faster track than some of us first thought. If nothing else, the mental burden has to be lighter since he walked out of that Panama City courthouse Monday. No more sit-downs with divorce attorneys, no more wrangling over how to reach the finish line in the least provocative manner.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
Previously sealed documents relating to the divorce case between Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman and her husband, Paul Volkman, were declared open last week, at least temporarily reversing an earlier order to shield the case from public scrutiny. In March, an Anne Arundel judge granted Neuman's request to seal the case without holding a hearing to determine if there was cause to do so, prompting objections from media organizations including The Baltimore Sun - and the decision to release documents until a hearing can be held.
FEATURES
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
Like a lot of break ups, the end of Nick Bergeris' marriage was complicated, according to court documents. Yes, he moved out after wife took out a protective order against him. And, yes, he eventually filed for divorce. But even then the couple spent a few nights together. All that stopped by March 2011, though, and so the following year Bergeris thought they had been separated for 12 months and were clear to get a divorce. Living apart for a year is one among a number of grounds for divorce in Maryland.
NEWS
By Edie Manney | December 25, 2013
Picture a young, newly divorced mom in the early 1970s, with three young children and hopes and dreams, trying desperately to make it on her own but finding life impossible. Imagine not having enough money to buy food for your children, or to afford to pay rent, and not feeling safe - feeling your life was completely unraveling, but you still have these children to care for and you have no way to make life work. That was the position my mother found herself in. She recently told me her story and said Head Start, the federal early learning program for children up to age 5, was her "salvation.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
Columnist Susan Reimer sees no problem with some groups paying more for health care insurance than their actuarial risk while others pay less under Obamacare ( "Splitting the health care tab with the guys," Nov. 11). She says "isn't that what insurance is for, to spread the risk?" However, spreading the risk is only one half the insurance equation. The other half is to provide each consumer with feedback on the amount of risk being transferred. That information is provided by linking the premium to behavior.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Sister Mary Joannes Clifford, a mathematics teacher who spent 53 years at Mercy High School and founded a ministry to the widowed, separated and divorced, died of cardiovascular disease Oct. 30 at her order's retirement home in the Woodbrook. She was 87. Born June Rose Clifford while her family was vacationing in Miami, she was the daughter of Baltimoreans James and Mary Ann Rochlitz Clifford. She was a graduate of the old Mount St. Agnes High School in Mount Washington and attended Trinity College in Washington, D.C., for two years before joining the Sisters of Mercy in 1945.
NEWS
October 29, 2013
Recently, the Vatican reaffirmed its position that divorced and remarried Catholics are barred from receiving communion. The solution then for a devout Catholic whose marriage ended in spousal abuse, infidelity, or otherwise through no fault on their own is just to live with a new partner without being remarried. But wait, there's a Catch 22: Doesn't that just constitute "living in sin?" The Vatican's position on remarrying makes about as much sense as its hypocritical position on homosexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | October 31, 2011
Today's news that Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries are calling it Kuits (she's filing for divorce after 72 days) has got the Twitterverse going nuts. For the People story on the not-that-unexpected break-up, go here . And before we hear what really went down (if we ever do) check out our favorite break-up reactions on Twitter (so far). @katespencer: "If I were a guest at that wedding I would want my gift(s) & time back. " @DarkSideIntern : "Kim Kardashian is divorcing.
FEATURES
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
Like a lot of break ups, the end of Nick Bergeris' marriage was complicated, according to court documents. Yes, he moved out after wife took out a protective order against him. And, yes, he eventually filed for divorce. But even then the couple spent a few nights together. All that stopped by March 2011, though, and so the following year Bergeris thought they had been separated for 12 months and were clear to get a divorce. Living apart for a year is one among a number of grounds for divorce in Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bailey O'Malia | December 21, 2012
It's the finale! As in, "thank God it's finally over!" The women are still in Bimini, and now they're trapped by bad weather. Marysol suggests the women cleanse themselves of the bad things in their life. How does one do that? You take apart an expensive flower arrangement, get into the ocean, wipe a flower all over your body as you talk about your problems and then throw the flower in the water. The women all say very serious and thoughtful things.  It's really unusual.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Noel Tshiani wasn't at his wedding — he listened by phone in another country to the ceremony in the Democratic Republic of Congo, according to court records — but he's just as married as if he'd stood at his bride's side. And soon, he'll be just as divorced and responsible for alimony and child support, a Maryland court has ruled. A World Bank employee, Tshiani was working in another African country when he and Marie-Louise Tshiani married in a 1993 ceremony. He answered questions and listened to the ceremony by telephone, while his cousin stood in his place for the ceremony, court records say. The exchange among families included money, clothes and a goat, and within days, the bride flew to join her husband, according to court records.
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