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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | August 8, 1993
A Pennsylvania carpenter is suing the state Division of Correction for keeping him in prison 28 days too long, contending an injury during his extended stay has prevented him from working.Kenneth Mitchell Barr, 37, of Delta, Pa., is seeking $100,000 in wages that he alleges he could have earned if he had not severely injured his hand on a band saw Oct. 27, 1992, while doing carpentry at the Jessup prison.That was a month after he contends he should have been paroled from the Brockbridge Correctional Institution in Jessup.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | July 16, 1993
Saying it is unfair to remove inmates serving life sentences from the state prerelease program, a prisoners' rights group plans to protest the action tonight outside Division of Correction headquarters in Northwest Baltimore.Members of the Maryland Prison Renewal Committee said they were appalled by the division's action last month to temporarily remove lifers from the family-leave and work-release components of the prerelease program."It's not just any Tom, Dick or Harry who they allow in the prerelease program, and most lifers on work-release have done quite well," Beverly Nur, one of the committee's 150 members, said yesterday.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | January 5, 1993
Jeffrey A. Levitt, the savings and loan swindler sentenced to 30 years in prison after pleading guilty to stealing $14.6 million from his own thrift, is scheduled to begin a $5.50-an-hour clerical job today on work-release.Levitt, the 50-year-old former president of the now-defunct Old Court Savings and Loan, is to be paroled in November.In the clerical job, he will be working 35.5 hours a week at a restaurant supply-type business in the Baltimore area, but correction officials refused to say specifically where.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer Staff writers Scott Shane and Jay Apperson contributed to this article | September 26, 1992
The three suspects in the shooting of Baltimore police Officer James E. Young Jr. at the Flag House Courts high-rise project are no strangers to Maryland's justice system.The alleged trigger man is a graduate of the state prison system's boot camp program; the second suspect, sources say, was an escapee from the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School; and the third is on probation from a 1991 drug conviction.Sean Lamont Little, 21, who is alleged to have shot Officer Young in the back of the head Sept.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Michael James and Joe Nawrozki and Michael James,Staff Writers | August 5, 1992
A correctional officer accused of fatally shooting his estranged wife Monday at the Kennedy Krieger Institute for children had been in a bitter dispute with her, and both had sought criminal harassment charges against the other.The correctional officer, Michael Hudgins, 29, had been arrested twice this year for alleged assaults against his wife. He, in turn, had alleged in a police complaint that he feared his 27-year-old wife and that she had threatened him with a gun.State Division of Correction records show that Mr. Hudgins, who worked at Patuxent Institution, was arrested Jan. 10 and June 1 in cases involving domestic violence.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | May 29, 1992
The first test results for tuberculosis at the Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown show that about a third of 550 inmates and 10 percent of the prison staff tested positive for the disease, the warden said last night.The number of inmates who tested positive for the disease is about twice the number released earlier by the Maryland Division of Correction, before additional test results became available.Roxbury Warden Jon P. Galley also said an inmate with an active case of tuberculosis who is suspected of exposing other inmates to the disease has a strain of tuberculosis that is resistant to two drugs.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | April 12, 1992
It took 18 months, but the state has fired former prison records supervisor John Patrick O'Donnell for the early release of killer John F. Thanos.In an 82-page decision, Administrative Law Judge Kenneth S. Watson, ordered that Mr. O'Donnell be dismissed and never again hired by the state. He was found to have violated a handful of administrative personnel regulations, stemming from the 1990 release of Thanos 18 months early from the Eastern Correctional Institution in Somerset County.Five months after his April 5, 1990, release, Thanos went on a crime spree during which he killed three teen-agers.
NEWS
February 12, 1992
Maj. Robert E. Clay, the demanding former Marine who ran the state's boot camp prison, has retired after 21 years in the state penal system.Major Clay helped plan the boot camp in Jessup and was in charge when it opened in August 1990.At the age of 43, Major Clay delighted in joining the grueling exercises and runs that characterize the boot camp regimen.Officials named no successor for Major Clay, who officially leaves April 1.In a statement released by the Division of Correction, Major Clay gave no reason for his resignation other than saying it was time to move on.The prison, formally known as the Herman L. Toulson Correctional Boot Camp, has graduated 12 classes totaling 417 inmates.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN GRAPHICS | December 18, 1991
Days before the end of the last century, hundreds of prisoners filed into the South Wing of Baltimore's new Maryland Penitentiary, heralded as "an imperishable monument to the humanitarianism of the state."At the time, the imposing granite fortress was state-of-the-art, a far cry from the squalor in which inmates had been living. So dramatic was the change that The Sun reported prisoners were "delighted with the conveniences" as they were locked into their dormitory cells for the first time.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | November 30, 1991
The one-time whistle-blower at Eastern Correctional Institution who the state is trying now to fire for the early prison release of John F. Thanos found himself behind bars this week.State Police arrested John P. O'Donnell, 51, on a charge of disorderly conduct at ECI, when he arrived late Wednesday afternoon at the Somerset County prison to pick up a letter faxed to him there by the Maryland Attorney General's office.After obtaining the letter, Mr. O'Donnell was met in the warden's office at ECI by a handful of troopers, including a corporal attached to the Division of Correction's Internal Investigation Unit who was a key state witness against him at a personnel hearing in the Thanos case.
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