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By Michael Ollove, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 1998
While John Waters filmed "Pink Flamingos" a quarter century ago, Steve Yeager, another young moviemaker, filmed him filming "Pink Flamingos. " We know what happened to Waters' footage. After its general release in 1973, "Pink Flamingos" became one the most celebrated underground movies in American film history, a depraved, subversive and altogether hilarious bit of celluloid that established Waters as one of the truly original voices in American cinema. The footage shot by Waters' friend Yeager had a more drawn-out trip to prominence.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | June 14, 2009
Steve Yeager appears caught off-guard when asked if he set out to earn a reputation as a filmmaker focusing on Baltimore's marginalized. The thought, it seems, has never really occurred to him. And yet, it's an obvious question. His first narrative film, 1990's On the Block, the story of a stripper struggling to go legit, was set and filmed in Baltimore's notorious red-light district. His biggest success, 1998's award-winning documentary Divine Trash, chronicled Baltimore's merriest bunch of misfits, the cast and crew of John Waters' reprobate 1972 masterpiece, Pink Flamingos.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 26, 1998
"Divine Trash," Baltimore filmmaker Steve Yeager's documentary about the life and work of cult auteur John Waters, won the Filmmakers Trophy at the Sundance Film Festival on Saturday.Yeager, who directed the film and co-produced it with Cindy Miller, was still "in a state of shock" when reached by telephone just minutes after receiving the award.The Filmmakers Trophy is voted on by the dramatic and documentary directors who are in competition at Sundance. This year, 31 filmmakers voted "Divine Trash" their favorite documentary.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 17, 2009
Some of the best music of the rock 'n' roll era will be featured at the Senator Theatre this weekend, as owner Tom Kiefaber continues to mark the coming end of his family's 70-year run as owners and operators of the North Baltimore landmark. Jonathan Demme's 1984 Stop Making Sense, a concert film capturing the Talking Heads at their creative peak, will play at 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday, followed at 10:30 p.m. by Francois Girard's 1994 Secret World Live, featuring Peter Gabriel in concert.
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1998
The Senator Theatre was overcome by a merciless attack of bad taste last night. Mismatched patterns, truckloads of mascara, beehive hairdos and sequins of every imaginable unnatural color. It was all there, and it was all awful.Of course, suspicion immediately fell upon John Waters, but this time out, the master of trash was only an accessory before the fact. The Senator wasn't premiering a film by John Waters but a film about John Waters. Turns out, the dress ensemble for one works just as well for the other.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 21, 1998
Steve Yeager is starting production on "In Bad Taste," a follow-up to "Divine Trash," his award-winning documentary about the early career of John Waters. "In Bad Taste" will take up where "Divine Trash" left off, following Waters' career from "Pink Flamingos" through his new film, "Pecker.""We don't know if it's going to be 60 minutes or 90 minutes," Yeager said, "but it will air on Bravo and the Independent Film Channel starting in late January." "In Bad Taste" will follow "the same basic format as 'Divine Trash,' " according to Yeager.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | June 14, 2009
Steve Yeager appears caught off-guard when asked if he set out to earn a reputation as a filmmaker focusing on Baltimore's marginalized. The thought, it seems, has never really occurred to him. And yet, it's an obvious question. His first narrative film, 1990's On the Block, the story of a stripper struggling to go legit, was set and filmed in Baltimore's notorious red-light district. His biggest success, 1998's award-winning documentary Divine Trash, chronicled Baltimore's merriest bunch of misfits, the cast and crew of John Waters' reprobate 1972 masterpiece, Pink Flamingos.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1998
How gloriously 1998 opened for Steve Yeager! The 53-year-old Baltimore filmmaker had made movies for decades that brought little recognition and less income. Then, in January, good fortune finally tracked him down. At Sundance, the most chichi film festival not on the French Riviera, Yeager's documentary on Baltimore guerrilla moviemaker John Waters won the Filmmaker's Trophy.Suddenly, Yeager was no longer just another anonymous documentarian. He was an anonymous documentarian with actual possibilities.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
Everything you'd ever want to know about what makes John Waters so fascinating, as both filmmaker and personality, are on display in "Divine Trash," Baltimorean Steve Yeager's delightfully worshipful look at the early days of Waters' career and their lasting effect on underground and independent cinema. Yeager's film mixes footage he shot during the making of "Pink Flamingos" (for an MPT documentary that never aired) with commentary from the inhabitants of Waters' world. That includes not only the director himself and his cast of regulars (Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2000
'Divine Trash' "Divine Trash," Steven Yeager's award-winning documentary about the early career of Baltimore-based director John Waters, finally opens for a theatrical run at the historic Senator Theatre. Unrated. `High Fidelity' "High Fidelity" is a romantic comedy starring John Cusack as an impassioned record store owner whose obsession with music gets in the way of his relationship. Based on Nick Hornby's book and co-starring Iben Hjejle, Lisa Bonet and Joan Cusack. R. `Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter Jr.' "Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter Jr."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 20, 2001
"Investigation of a Flame," director Lynne Sachs' documentary on the Catonsville 9 and their epoch-shaping 1968 antiwar protests, will be the opening night feature of this year's Maryland Film Festival. Sachs' film, which will be getting its world premiere at the May 3 festival opening, includes interviews with seven of the eight surviving members of the group, who made headlines May 17, 1968, when they walked into the Catonsville draft office and burned hundreds of draft records. The event helped galvanize the nation's growing antiwar movement and brought the Berrigan brothers, Philip and Daniel, into the national spotlight.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 15, 2000
A.R. Gurney may have written his 1989 epistolary play, "Love Letters," for a cast of two, but 64 local actors will be performing it at the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre, beginning today. The actors, however, will be appearing in pairs, one couple per performance, through Nov. 5. "It's a great cross section of Baltimore theater history," said Steve Yeager, who is directing the play, in which a pair of seated actors read a correspondence spanning several decades. The lineup includes several real-life married couples, among them: WJZ anchor Denise Koch and Jackson Phippin, director of the acting program at Catholic University of America; jazz singer Ethel Ennis and writer Earl Arnett; and Donald Hicken, head of the drama department at the Baltimore School for the Arts, and actress Tana Hicken.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2000
John Waters once wrote of his arch-nemesis, "I realized Mary Avara was the greatest press agent I could have. " It was, of course, John Waters the ironist who made that observation about Avara, who died last week at 90. No one recognized more cogently than Waters that his legendary battles with Avara and her Maryland State Censor Board were more complicated than their end result - with chunks of Waters' films on the cutting-room floor. It is certainly an overstatement to say, as some have, that Waters would have no career were it not for the puritanical Avara.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
Everything you'd ever want to know about what makes John Waters so fascinating, as both filmmaker and personality, are on display in "Divine Trash," Baltimorean Steve Yeager's delightfully worshipful look at the early days of Waters' career and their lasting effect on underground and independent cinema. Yeager's film mixes footage he shot during the making of "Pink Flamingos" (for an MPT documentary that never aired) with commentary from the inhabitants of Waters' world. That includes not only the director himself and his cast of regulars (Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2000
'Divine Trash' "Divine Trash," Steven Yeager's award-winning documentary about the early career of Baltimore-based director John Waters, finally opens for a theatrical run at the historic Senator Theatre. Unrated. `High Fidelity' "High Fidelity" is a romantic comedy starring John Cusack as an impassioned record store owner whose obsession with music gets in the way of his relationship. Based on Nick Hornby's book and co-starring Iben Hjejle, Lisa Bonet and Joan Cusack. R. `Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter Jr.' "Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter Jr."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 1, 1999
The Inscape Theatre at Villa Julie College will produce an updated 40th anniversary production of Jack Gelber's Obie Award-winning play about drug culture, "The Connection," Nov. 11-20, and the playwright will participate in a panel discussion of the once-controversial drama on Nov. 13.When "The Connection" debuted, in a production by Judith Malina and Julian Beck's Living Theatre, it was heralded as groundbreaking. Writing in the New Yorker, critic Kenneth Tynan called it "the most exciting new play that off-Broadway has produced since the war."
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 17, 2009
Some of the best music of the rock 'n' roll era will be featured at the Senator Theatre this weekend, as owner Tom Kiefaber continues to mark the coming end of his family's 70-year run as owners and operators of the North Baltimore landmark. Jonathan Demme's 1984 Stop Making Sense, a concert film capturing the Talking Heads at their creative peak, will play at 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday, followed at 10:30 p.m. by Francois Girard's 1994 Secret World Live, featuring Peter Gabriel in concert.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 24, 1999
Who says that art can't change your life?While Jason Freeland was editing "Brown's Requiem," his adaptation of James Ellroy's first novel, he found himself relating in an unsettling way to the film's main character, Fritz Brown.Brown, played in the movie by Michael Rooker ("Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer"), is a hopeless alcoholic who's been fired from his job as a Los Angeles cop -- the only thing that gave his life meaning. As Freeland, 31, considered the image of a man who can't connect his despair with his own self-destruction, he realized that Brown's experience resonated deeply with his own."
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1998
How gloriously 1998 opened for Steve Yeager! The 53-year-old Baltimore filmmaker had made movies for decades that brought little recognition and less income. Then, in January, good fortune finally tracked him down. At Sundance, the most chichi film festival not on the French Riviera, Yeager's documentary on Baltimore guerrilla moviemaker John Waters won the Filmmaker's Trophy.Suddenly, Yeager was no longer just another anonymous documentarian. He was an anonymous documentarian with actual possibilities.
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