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BUSINESS
By Amy C. Arnott and Amy C. Arnott,MORNINGSTAR.COM | June 15, 2003
Investors who wouldn't mind getting a check or two in the mail from their stock portfolios can breathe a sigh of relief. They will now pay a tax rate of 15 percent on stock dividends, instead of paying taxes at much higher ordinary-income tax rates. That makes dividend-paying stocks more attractive for taxable accounts. Let's look at some. We'll focus on stocks that have a proven record of boosting their dividends over time, as well as the financial resources to continue paying dividends in the future.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
Apple made headlines again last week, but this time they weren't entirely about the new iPad. The tech behemoth announced that it would start paying a quarterly dividend worth $2.65 per share beginning in July. That amounts to nearly $10 billion to be paid out in the first year alone. "Apple is the leader here," says Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst with Standard & Poor's, who adds that the company will put pressure on other technology firms to start paying dividends. Dividends usually are awarded by well-established companies that no longer need every dollar to grow.
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Brown and Jeff Brown,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 20, 2002
Disgusted by making less than 2 percent on an income-oriented holding such as a money market fund or short-term CD? Then think about stocks - dividend-paying stocks, that is. So suggests portfolio strategist Carol M. Lippman at A.G. Edwards, though she notes the selection has to be very, very careful. Not many investors focus on dividends these days -not surprising since the average dividend yield among Standard & Poor's 500 stocks is a measly 1.34 percent. Dividend yield is the last 12 months' dividend payments divided by a stock's current price.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Chicago Tribune | September 10, 2006
Now that dividend-paying stocks are no longer treated like sensible shoes on the set of Desperate Housewives, will the allure last? Dividend-focused mutual funds, closed-end funds and exchange-traded funds have been on the rise for more than a year, with the latest entry set to make its debut in the fourth quarter. The Vanguard High Dividend Yield Index Fund will be available as a traditional mutual fund as well as an exchange-traded fund. It will track the performance of the FTSE High Dividend Yield Index, a new benchmark, company officials said.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 2003
Nine months after declaring its first-ever dividend payout, the Microsoft Corp. said yesterday that its board had approved a doubling in the size of its annual cash payout, to 16 cents a share. Microsoft, which is the world's second-biggest company by market value, will now spend $1.74 billion a year on the dividend. The announcement came as a bit of a surprise, because as recently as July the company had said it had no intention of increasing the dividend, noting concerns about outstanding lawsuits.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | April 7, 1993
American investors in search of high yields no longer are petrified at the prospect of putting money in the commercial real estate market.Real estate investment trusts, or REITs, publicly traded companies that hold real estate portfolios, are gaining popularity. Investing in real estate, mortgages or both, REITs pay out 95 percent of their income as dividends.The average REIT dividend yield is now more than 7 percent. REITs featured an average total return (dividend yield plus price appreciation)
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 1996
John Fields begins each week, as many executives do, with a Monday morning meeting.But unlike most people, he actually enjoys his.Mr. Fields, the senior portfolio manager of the Delaware Group's two Decatur mutual funds, meets with the 13 team members who manage different parts of the funds' portfolios -- such as banking or chemical stocks.They and their computer gather on the 14th floor of One Commerce Square in Center City Philadelphia to discuss market happenings and the effects on the funds' investments.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | July 24, 1992
When Ross Perot was an apparent presidential candidate, the direction of the stock market was especially uncertain, which translated to, at best, a drift in the market.With Mr. Perot out and Bill Clinton riding high in the polls, the market will continue to drift, or decline, because Mr. Clinton is viewed as less favorable to business than is President Bush.It is unlikely that stock prices will do anything meaningful until the general election in November, unless President Bush grabs a lead before the election.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | June 19, 1992
McCormick & Co.'s board of directors meets today to decide the amount of the second-quarter dividend. If the directors follow the pattern that has prevailed for the past four years, that dividend will be raised, probably by 1 cent a share.To the casual observer, this might not seem like much, a mere penny for each share and only $1 if one owns 100 shares of McCormick.But McCormick's dividend increases are more than skin deep. They come often, and their value is multiplied by the relatively frequent stock splits effected by the company.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Chicago Tribune | September 10, 2006
Now that dividend-paying stocks are no longer treated like sensible shoes on the set of Desperate Housewives, will the allure last? Dividend-focused mutual funds, closed-end funds and exchange-traded funds have been on the rise for more than a year, with the latest entry set to make its debut in the fourth quarter. The Vanguard High Dividend Yield Index Fund will be available as a traditional mutual fund as well as an exchange-traded fund. It will track the performance of the FTSE High Dividend Yield Index, a new benchmark, company officials said.
BUSINESS
By HUMBERTO CRUZ and HUMBERTO CRUZ,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 16, 2006
Where do you find a well-diversified investment that throws up a dividend yield of almost 24 percent? In the stock market. OK, that was a trick question (and trick answer). That juicy yield - 23.76 percent to be exact - reflects the dividends you would have received from the stocks in the Standard & Poor's 500 index last year as a percentage of the price you would have paid to buy the stocks in the index in 1970. That year, your yield would have been 3.36 percent. But as companies in the index kept raising their dividends over time, your "yield on cost" - the annual dividends paid by companies in the index as a percentage of your original investment - would have risen fairly steadily, exceeding 10 percent in 1988 and 15 percent in 1996.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | February 22, 2004
Whatever people might say about the general economy, there's a boom in the building of new homes and steady growth in shopping malls. Thank low interest rates for much of that activity. Many investors have prospered from the stocks of companies involved in real estate. Because these don't move in lock step with the rest of the market, they also provide diversification. But real estate also moves in cycles, which is why it should be viewed as a long-term investment. The CGM Realty Fund rose 87.67 percent over the past 12 months by investing nearly two-thirds of its portfolio in homebuilder stocks.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 2003
Nine months after declaring its first-ever dividend payout, the Microsoft Corp. said yesterday that its board had approved a doubling in the size of its annual cash payout, to 16 cents a share. Microsoft, which is the world's second-biggest company by market value, will now spend $1.74 billion a year on the dividend. The announcement came as a bit of a surprise, because as recently as July the company had said it had no intention of increasing the dividend, noting concerns about outstanding lawsuits.
BUSINESS
By Amy C. Arnott and Amy C. Arnott,MORNINGSTAR.COM | June 15, 2003
Investors who wouldn't mind getting a check or two in the mail from their stock portfolios can breathe a sigh of relief. They will now pay a tax rate of 15 percent on stock dividends, instead of paying taxes at much higher ordinary-income tax rates. That makes dividend-paying stocks more attractive for taxable accounts. Let's look at some. We'll focus on stocks that have a proven record of boosting their dividends over time, as well as the financial resources to continue paying dividends in the future.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Brown and Jeff Brown,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 20, 2002
Disgusted by making less than 2 percent on an income-oriented holding such as a money market fund or short-term CD? Then think about stocks - dividend-paying stocks, that is. So suggests portfolio strategist Carol M. Lippman at A.G. Edwards, though she notes the selection has to be very, very careful. Not many investors focus on dividends these days -not surprising since the average dividend yield among Standard & Poor's 500 stocks is a measly 1.34 percent. Dividend yield is the last 12 months' dividend payments divided by a stock's current price.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 5, 1997
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it will repurchase $2.5 billion in stock, its second big buyback in a year, but disappointed investors by leaving its dividend unchanged.Some analysts and investors were expecting a bigger buyback or another dividend boost because the company is almost $2 billion above its $13 billion target for cash on hand.GM shares fell $1.8125 to $62.625 in trading of 4.38 million shares, compared with the three-month-daily average of 2.45 million. The decline erased some of the 15 percent gain GM shares rang up last week.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 5, 1997
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it will repurchase $2.5 billion in stock, its second big buyback in a year, but disappointed investors by leaving its dividend unchanged.Some analysts and investors were expecting a bigger buyback or another dividend boost because the company is almost $2 billion above its $13 billion target for cash on hand.GM shares fell $1.8125 to $62.625 in trading of 4.38 million shares, compared with the three-month-daily average of 2.45 million. The decline erased some of the 15 percent gain GM shares rang up last week.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,1987 Tribune Media Services, Inc | January 23, 1991
Whenever there is economic or political turmoil, electric utility stocks shine brightly.Historically, these defensive investments never fall as much in down stock markets as most other groups. For example, during the last 12 months, when the Standard & Poor's 500 was down more than 10 percent, electric utilities as a group slipped a more modest 7 percent."In recession, electric utilities are a safe haven offering dividend yields averaging around 7.4 percent, compared to 3.4 percent for the average stock," said William Tilles, analyst with Dean Witter Reynolds Inc.Keep in mind, however, that corporate users of electricity may well cut back their use if they've had to scale back business efforts for economic reasons.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 1996
John Fields begins each week, as many executives do, with a Monday morning meeting.But unlike most people, he actually enjoys his.Mr. Fields, the senior portfolio manager of the Delaware Group's two Decatur mutual funds, meets with the 13 team members who manage different parts of the funds' portfolios -- such as banking or chemical stocks.They and their computer gather on the 14th floor of One Commerce Square in Center City Philadelphia to discuss market happenings and the effects on the funds' investments.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | May 11, 1994
Love me, love my electric utility stock.That's been the sentiment of conservative older investors whose passion for yield-producing holdings usually endures for decades. The average electric utility dividend yield, after all, is a hefty 6.7 percent.This love affair may be ending.Down more than 20 percent in value from their all-time high set last fall, electric utility stocks have been severely wounded by rising interest rates.Admittedly, the worst is now probably over in terms of rate concerns.
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