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By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 4, 1994
The system may be the solution.Dividend reinvestment plans offer an excellent way taccumulate stock without costing you an arm and a leg. They permit you to plow your dividends into buying additional shares at no brokerage cost, as well as make additional contributions.Already offered by more than 900 U.S. companies, dividend reinvestment plans are undergoing worthwhile changes.A growing number now permit you to make your initial investment in the plan directly through the company without a broker.
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NEWS
By Phil Manger | September 26, 2008
Now I know how Warren E. Buffett acquired all those companies so cheaply. The deal his MidAmerican Energy Holdings struck with the board of Constellation Energy Group last week smacks of possible management self-dealing. For accepting Mr. Buffett's steeply discounted offer at $26.50 per share, while spurning an offer that would have given shareholders $8.50 per share more while still providing Constellation all the cash it needs, the directors and management have a "lot of 'splainin' to do."
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
Joining a trend to put some meat on what has been a bare-bones service, T. Rowe Price Investment Services Inc. said yesterday that it is starting a dividend reinvestment program for its discount brokerage customers.The free service by the Baltimore-based mutual funds company gives customers the option of having their stock dividends or capital gains distributions from closed-end funds automatically reinvested in additional shares. Before this, the dividends were either mailed to the shareholders or transferred to a Price money market fund, according to Price spokesman Steven E. Norwitz.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
NEW YORK - Raymond A. "Chip" Mason, chairman and chief executive of Legg Mason Inc., said yesterday that, despite several years of spectacular results, it is difficult for him to gauge how well the company will do next year. "I can't look forward in our business in terms of results," Mason told reporters who were attending the company's year-end symposium at "21" in Midtown Manhattan. "Certainly, our posture is for the company to continue to grow." Mason said it is difficult to predict performance because of the uncertainty of the stock market.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | December 18, 1992
No broker required. It's possible to buy stock from a number of U.S. companies without paying any commission. Direct first-time stock purchase programs permit you to buy your initial share or shares directly from the company, then add to your investment regularly, if you wish.These programs differ from conventional dividend reinvestment plans, in that they don't require you to make the initial share purchase through a stock broker.Fewer than a dozen firms offer direct first-time purchase programs to all investors.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 9, 1994
It can be worth knowing what securities analysts think about a stock, if only so you can do the opposite of what they recommend.And so active stock-pickers might be interested in Analyst Watch, a new publication from Zack's Investment Research. The company's business has been selling to brokers and institutional investors information about analysts' estimates of corporate earnings and analysts' recommendations on stocks.Stock prices often jump or fall in response to an analyst's buy or sell recommendation or when a company's profit exceeds or matches the forecasts of analysts.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY and SUSAN BONDY,Creators Syndicate | July 9, 1995
One of the best-kept secrets of Wall Street is that most dividend reinvestment plans also permit new cash investments.A more accurate name would be "company-sponsored stock-purchase plans."The big plus for the investor is that in these plans, both dividends and new cash are invested without commissions or service fees (or very small charges in the case of a few companies).Some plans even invest your money at a discount from the market price. In these instances, your dollar is worth more in the plan than it would be if you bought the same shares from a broker, since you save the commission and pay a lower price.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media | October 22, 1991
Just do it. Though that's the call-to-exercise ad slogan of a famous maker of running shoes, it applies to investing as well. You don't have to invest a lot of money to make a big long-term difference. Just get started and keep on going.Putting investment money aside on a regular, dollar-by-dollar, month-in and month-out basis, you'll accumulate a lot more than you thought you could. You can invest the money yourself by check. Or you can let credit unions, investment firms, banks, insurance firms or your employer do it for you through automatic programs.
NEWS
By Phil Manger | September 26, 2008
Now I know how Warren E. Buffett acquired all those companies so cheaply. The deal his MidAmerican Energy Holdings struck with the board of Constellation Energy Group last week smacks of possible management self-dealing. For accepting Mr. Buffett's steeply discounted offer at $26.50 per share, while spurning an offer that would have given shareholders $8.50 per share more while still providing Constellation all the cash it needs, the directors and management have a "lot of 'splainin' to do."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | February 22, 1995
Surprise, surprise.No full-service broker required. No discount broker, either. That's what a "no-load" stock is all about.American investors understand the concept of no-load mutual funds with no upfront sales charges, but that popular idea is expanding to individual equities.There are about 60 stocks investors can buy directly from the issuing company.That's expected to grow significantly in 1995 -- likely to more than 100 -- because a recent regulatory change makes it easier to set them up. The Securities and Exchange Commission issued a "no action" letter so a plan can be implemented almost immediately without a lengthy approval process.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | January 30, 2000
JOHN LACEY is a walking advertisement for dividend reinvestment plans. The Ellicott City retiree invests in 51 DRIPs, which allow him to buy stock directly from companies and automatically reinvest the dividends. By doing so, Lacey avoids paying hefty broker commissions. But that's not the only reason Lacey is an advocate and tries to convert others, from grandchildren to friends and acquaintances, to DRIP investing. "I can't make $500, or $1,000 or multiple thousand purchases often.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY and SUSAN BONDY,Creators Syndicate | July 9, 1995
One of the best-kept secrets of Wall Street is that most dividend reinvestment plans also permit new cash investments.A more accurate name would be "company-sponsored stock-purchase plans."The big plus for the investor is that in these plans, both dividends and new cash are invested without commissions or service fees (or very small charges in the case of a few companies).Some plans even invest your money at a discount from the market price. In these instances, your dollar is worth more in the plan than it would be if you bought the same shares from a broker, since you save the commission and pay a lower price.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
Joining a trend to put some meat on what has been a bare-bones service, T. Rowe Price Investment Services Inc. said yesterday that it is starting a dividend reinvestment program for its discount brokerage customers.The free service by the Baltimore-based mutual funds company gives customers the option of having their stock dividends or capital gains distributions from closed-end funds automatically reinvested in additional shares. Before this, the dividends were either mailed to the shareholders or transferred to a Price money market fund, according to Price spokesman Steven E. Norwitz.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | February 22, 1995
Surprise, surprise.No full-service broker required. No discount broker, either. That's what a "no-load" stock is all about.American investors understand the concept of no-load mutual funds with no upfront sales charges, but that popular idea is expanding to individual equities.There are about 60 stocks investors can buy directly from the issuing company.That's expected to grow significantly in 1995 -- likely to more than 100 -- because a recent regulatory change makes it easier to set them up. The Securities and Exchange Commission issued a "no action" letter so a plan can be implemented almost immediately without a lengthy approval process.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 4, 1994
The system may be the solution.Dividend reinvestment plans offer an excellent way taccumulate stock without costing you an arm and a leg. They permit you to plow your dividends into buying additional shares at no brokerage cost, as well as make additional contributions.Already offered by more than 900 U.S. companies, dividend reinvestment plans are undergoing worthwhile changes.A growing number now permit you to make your initial investment in the plan directly through the company without a broker.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1994 Washington Post Writers Group | February 6, 1994
NEW YORK -- If you're a tightwad stock investor, you've probably thought about joining a "Drip." That's shorthand for a dividend reinvestment plan. Some 900 companies offer Drips to individual shareholders (not mutual funds) who want to buy shares as cheaply as possible.A Drip eliminates the stockbroker. You keep your company shares in the plan; when dividends are declared, part or all of them are invested in new shares automatically. You can often buy at a 3 percent to 5 percent discount from the current market price.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1994 Washington Post Writers Group | February 6, 1994
NEW YORK -- If you're a tightwad stock investor, you've probably thought about joining a "Drip." That's shorthand for a dividend reinvestment plan. Some 900 companies offer Drips to individual shareholders (not mutual funds) who want to buy shares as cheaply as possible.A Drip eliminates the stockbroker. You keep your company shares in the plan; when dividends are declared, part or all of them are invested in new shares automatically. You can often buy at a 3 percent to 5 percent discount from the current market price.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
NEW YORK - Raymond A. "Chip" Mason, chairman and chief executive of Legg Mason Inc., said yesterday that, despite several years of spectacular results, it is difficult for him to gauge how well the company will do next year. "I can't look forward in our business in terms of results," Mason told reporters who were attending the company's year-end symposium at "21" in Midtown Manhattan. "Certainly, our posture is for the company to continue to grow." Mason said it is difficult to predict performance because of the uncertainty of the stock market.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 9, 1994
It can be worth knowing what securities analysts think about a stock, if only so you can do the opposite of what they recommend.And so active stock-pickers might be interested in Analyst Watch, a new publication from Zack's Investment Research. The company's business has been selling to brokers and institutional investors information about analysts' estimates of corporate earnings and analysts' recommendations on stocks.Stock prices often jump or fall in response to an analyst's buy or sell recommendation or when a company's profit exceeds or matches the forecasts of analysts.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | December 18, 1992
No broker required. It's possible to buy stock from a number of U.S. companies without paying any commission. Direct first-time stock purchase programs permit you to buy your initial share or shares directly from the company, then add to your investment regularly, if you wish.These programs differ from conventional dividend reinvestment plans, in that they don't require you to make the initial share purchase through a stock broker.Fewer than a dozen firms offer direct first-time purchase programs to all investors.
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