Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDistrust
IN THE NEWS

Distrust

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 2010
President Obama said in his State of the Union address that we need to restore trust in the government. Our country was founded on distrust of government. Read the Declatation of Independence, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the writings of the Founding Fathers. Distrust of big government is the basis of freedom. Ted Hartka, Phoenix
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 2, 2014
What's the reason for the tempest in the teapot of Hillary and Bill Clinton's personal finances? It can't be about how much money they have. Wealth has never disqualified someone from high office. Several of the nation's greatest presidents, who came to office with vast fortunes -- John F. Kennedy, Franklin D. Roosevelt and his fifth cousin, Teddy -- notably improved the lives of ordinary Americans. The tempest can't be about Hillary Clinton's veracity. It may have been a stretch for her to say she and her husband were "dead broke" when they left the White House, as she told ABC's Diane Sawyer.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 11, 2012
In a nutshell, Baltimore City is demanding immediate repayment of tax credits it erroneously gave to taxpayers, often over a period of several years ("City homeowners given 30 days to repay tax credits they didn't request," April 8). We must refund their mistakes right now, or else. This is the same Baltimore City that would seize your house for non payment of water bills that were wildly inaccurate. And these mistakes were not realized until private enterprise (The Baltimore Sun) pointed them out. No wonder we lack respect for and distrust the government.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 25, 2014
As a crime summit approaches and a survey finds public mistrust of police, the beat goes on for one Northern District officer who patrols the crime-prone Pen Lucy area. "It's the passion that I have," said Officer Edwin Albino, 37, of Edgewood, a nearly eight-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department and a Puerto Rico state police officer before that. "As soon as I wake up in the morning and put my uniform on, there is a sense of pride. I will work in any (police) district, because I'm representing Baltimore City police.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
As older baby boomers near or enter retirement, many are so paralyzed by fears of poverty and distrust of financial advisers that they can't take the steps needed to secure their future, according to a report released Monday by a California investment adviser. Instead, they often rely on "magical thinking," where they hope that it will somehow all work out in the end, says Financial Engines, which interviewed more than 300 older boomers during the past three years. It's understandable that early boomers, the oldest of whom turn 65 this year, are worried.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
NORTHERN Ireland's new Cabinet is a tribute to former U.S. Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell's tact and patience as moderator of the talks that brought it about.Now they are on their own.The new regime resembles an attempt that got off the ground in 1974 only to crash under withering opposition from the distrusting Protestant community.A young Ulster Unionist politician who helped shoot it down, David Trimble, leads this experiment as first minister. Seamus Mallon, of the Social Democratic and Labor party in the Catholic community, is deputy minister.
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | July 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush acknowledged bitter strains between his party and African-Americans in an appearance before the nation's oldest civil rights organization yesterday that offered reminders that the president and Republicans remain deeply unpopular among black voters. Addressing the NAACP's annual convention for the first time as president, Bush drew a warm response when he promised to sign into law a renewal of the Voting Rights Act that cleared Congress yesterday. "I understand that racism still lingers in America," said Bush, who received a polite but reserved reception as he outlined priorities he said he had in common with blacks, such as rebuilding the Gulf Coast, improving education and expanding home ownership.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | December 18, 1990
Black experts on AIDS are calling for new prevention and treatment programs tailored to minority communities in a refocused effort that they say is needed because of a distrust of government by many blacks.At a conference in Baltimore yesterday, experts told the National Commission on AIDS that black community leaders have responded slowly to the epidemic, which has hit blacks in large ** numbers.Of 3,099 AIDS cases in Maryland since 1981, more than half, 1,864, involve blacks.Among the reasons for the slow response is that existing programs in black communities often aren't led by blacks and don't adequately address minority concerns and skepticism toward government, the experts testified.
NEWS
November 9, 1996
THE MOOD IN Maryland's suburbia -- the home of soccer moms and angry white males -- still seems fragile and distrustful, in spite of President Clinton's re-election Tuesday.Indeed, Mr. Clinton ran more competitively in this state's broad and burgeoning belt of tract housing and strip malls than he did when he captured the presidency in 1992.He also fared better than the results of the 1994 state election would have indicated when a fellow Democrat, Gov. Parris Glendening, lost all but the three most urban jurisdictions -- Baltimore City and Montgomery and Prince George's counties.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
FEUDING politicians who had little trust for one another. A secretive process that was frustratingly slow in producing a document that would be the foundation of a new nation. Compromises that made little sense and seemed only to plant the seeds of future discord. That could describe the various delegates trying to come up with a constitution for Iraq. Or it could describe the delegates who gathered in Philadelphia in 1787 to try to do the same for the fledgling United States. Though the levels of enmity and distrust are often decried as poisoning the possibility of Iraqis ever agreeing on a new constitution, in Philadelphia two centuries ago, distrust was probably a crucial element in the success of the document those delegates wrote.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 16, 2013
Democrats aren't unscathed from these past weeks of shuttered government and potential default, but polls show Republicans have taken a shellacking. Republicans who tried to hijack America didn't understand one very basic thing. While most Americans don't like big government, Americans revere our system of government. That's why even though a majority still disapprove of the Affordable Care Act, a majority also disapproved of Republican tactics for repealing or delaying it. Government itself has never been popular in America except during palpable crises such as war or deep depression.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
The Obama administration's policies toward Afghanistan are emblematic of its monumental incompetence in foreign affairs ("Pulling the plug on Karzai," July 10). As wrongheaded and harmful as its domestic policies are, at least on the domestic side, the administration knows where it wants to go. In foreign affairs, its ignorance, naivete and indecision have resulted in the loss of one of our strongest allies in the Middle East (Egypt), the death of our ambassador in Benghazi, a total misreading of the "Arab Spring," vacillation in Africa and now the consideration of a path in Afghanistan that would essentially gut any headway that has been made at the cost of thousands of American lives.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
Perhaps it was the expectations raised by his far more eloquent appearances at earlier conventions, or maybe it was the modest ambitions he embraced, or that he labored in the shadow of Bill Clinton's rousing defense of his administration, but even the most hard-core Democrat would have to concede that President Barack Obama's acceptance speech to his party's national convention was neither especially memorable nor ambitious. If the message of the Republican National Convention can be distilled to, as Mr. Clinton memorably described it, "we left him a total mess, he hasn't cleaned it up fast enough, so fire him and put us back in," then perhaps the Democratic National Convention might be boiled down to "we're doing the best we can with this mess so be patient, and, oh, by the way, that other guy would be a lot worse.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
Susan Fulton says about 100 clients of her Bethesda asset-management firm were "up for the risk" last month and invested a total of $1 million the day Facebook went public. "We bought it at the open, though we couldn't get confirmation on their trades," says Fulton, founder and president of FBB Capital Partners. "Nasdaq was shut down. " The stock exchange's technical problems aren't Fulton's only complaint. She's also upset over allegations that Facebook told underwriters before the initial public offering that revenues would be weaker than expected — and that this information was passed on to institutional investors but not to small investors like her clients.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
In a nutshell, Baltimore City is demanding immediate repayment of tax credits it erroneously gave to taxpayers, often over a period of several years ("City homeowners given 30 days to repay tax credits they didn't request," April 8). We must refund their mistakes right now, or else. This is the same Baltimore City that would seize your house for non payment of water bills that were wildly inaccurate. And these mistakes were not realized until private enterprise (The Baltimore Sun) pointed them out. No wonder we lack respect for and distrust the government.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 19, 2011
"How do we stop Newt?" I've now been asked that question by a lot of conservatives. It's not that I'm the go-to guy for that sort of question. Rather, one gets the sense that many "establishment" conservatives are asking everybody that question - in staff meetings, at the chiropodist, even at the McDonald's drive-thru. ("I'll have two happy meals, two chocolate milks and - by the way - do you have any idea how to stop Newt?") The other night, while having drinks with some prominent conservatives, I said I thought there was a significant chance that Newt Gingrich will not only win the nomination but that he might be the next president.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
IF RICHARD NIXON had just gone quietly, there would probably be no call for a special prosecutor to investigate the Bush White House for leaking the identity of a CIA agent. Chalk up another one to the legacy of Watergate. More than a quarter-century later, its legacy still informs the issue over administration officials allegedly telling reporters that the wife of an administration critic was in the CIA. Consider that in the two centuries of U.S. history before Watergate, there were only a handful of special prosecutors.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
QUEENSTOWN -- A day before an American-imposed deadline for a breakthrough, President Clinton flew here yesterday to speed up slow-moving talks between the leaders of Israel and the Palestinians.Clinton spent much of the afternoon closeted separately with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in mansions on the secluded Wye Plantation estate here.Negotiations were to continue late into the night.White House spokesman Joe Lockhart gave no indication of how forceful the president felt he needed to be to bring about a deal.
NEWS
July 16, 2011
Steven L. Salzberg's response to Margaret Dunkle's vaccination op-ed is itself a study in fear-mongering and ignorance ("Sun prints dangerous anti-vaccination op-ed," July 14). It is precisely because of the condescending and uninformed views of Dr. Salzberg that parents are losing confidence in the CDC mandated vaccination program. Salzberg is "deeply concerned" that the op-ed piece will lead to decreased uptake of vaccination and increased morbidity due to vaccine-preventable infectious diseases.
EXPLORE
June 15, 2011
I write to perhaps shed some light on the reasoning for opposition to the use of speed cameras generally, which I believe can be extended to their use in school zones. First a few contextual background points. Governments, because of their organization, structure, personnel and political nature, are terrible at distinguishing the difference between "causes" and "effects," so policy changes very seldom actually work, achieve their intended purpose, and are incredibly difficult to change once adopted.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.