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NEWS
July 16, 1994
The fiscal calamity that has been stalking the District of Columbia for years finally struck. Congress, which oversees the city's affairs, has ordered officials to slash up to $150 million from the municipal budget or risk losing the huge federal payment on which Washington depends to balance its books. Action in both the House and Senate represented a stunning vote of no-confidence in the administration of Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly.The House vote was the kind of congressional comeuppance both supporters and critics of the district government long warned was inevitable unless the city put its fiscal house in order.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Thomas M. Gibbons, former president and CEO of Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Cos. who also served on boards of business and educational institutions, died Sunday of complications from a stroke at The Terraces of Bonita Springs Retirement Community in Bonita Springs, Fla. The former Roland Park resident was 88. "Tom was one of the best executives I ever met or worked for in my life," said John Henry "Hank" Butta, a former president and CEO...
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NEWS
By George F. Will | August 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- This summer, after years of democratic revolutions around the world, two great cities were stripped of popular sovereignty. One of them, the capital of this Republic, deserved to be.Hong Kong's self-government became a casualty because of a treaty signed a century ago and a Communist revolution.The fate of democracy in the District of Columbia was less necessary and hence is, in a sense, more troubling.Congress' repeal of the District's home rule has been characterized antiseptically as a "revitalization" plan to "restructure the relationship" between the District and Congress, which is constitutionally empowered to "exercise exclusive legislation" over "the seat of the government."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
George K. McKinney, who was the first African-American to be appointed U.S. marshal for the District of Maryland, and whose career in federal service spanned more than four decades, died June 17 of leukemia at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 77. "It is with deep sadness that I acknowledge the passing of my dear friend, retired U.S. marshal George K. McKinney," Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said in a statement. "George held the distinct honor of being the only African-American appointed U.S. marshal to two different jurisdictions by two different presidents.
NEWS
By Mick Rood and Mick Rood,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Sharon Pratt Dixon scored a surprising upset in the mayor's race in Washington, D.C., walking away from City Councilman John Ray, who had amassed a commanding $1 million in contributions in the Democratic primary.Dixon, a former Potomac Electric Power Co. official and prominent Democratic Party official, shook a reputation of being an elitist unaware of the problems on the street and successfully molded herself as the outsider needed to reform the capital's troubled government.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The District of Columbia sent 80,000 public school students home for the summer last Friday -- two weeks ahead of schedule. The school system is broke.Early dismissal D.C.-style provided the appropriate punctuation to a dispiriting spring that revealed, day by day, the breathtaking magnitude of Washington's problems.The police are so furious about their huge pay cut that they are slow to make nonemergency arrests and the chief quit.The mayor, Marion S. Barry Jr., is under investigation for alleged ethics violations and the district's credit rating has plunged to junk bond status.
NEWS
January 15, 1997
MARYLAND's lost but unlamented province, the District of Columbia, now has an offer it can't refuse -- provided Congress gives its okay. The Clinton administration, after trying to ignore the urban breakdown evident in all directions from the White House, is now proposing to take over major government functions D.C. can't handle. In exchange, the financial control system imposed on Washington a year ago would be continued and stiffened.All this means the district's 23-year experiment in home rule is a failure; its pretensions to statehood can be consigned to the deep freeze.
NEWS
September 17, 1998
THE REALITY of a District of Columbia government without Mayor Marion Barry didn't sink in until Anthony A. Williams' decisive victory in Tuesday's Democratic primary. In a field of seven, Mr. Williams outdistanced his closest competitor by 15 percentage points.In selecting the antithesis of Mayor Barry to carry the party standard, Washington Democrats have let the world know that they, too, finally believe enough is enough. They want a mayor who can effectively complete the city's recovery from 16 years of decline under Barry administrations.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - Just weeks after allowing the decade-old federal ban on assault weapons to expire, the House voted yesterday to repeal the District of Columbia's tough 28-year-old gun control law in a move that thrust the emotional issue into the election year spotlight. The bill is not expected to reach the president's desk his year. The vote was intended by the House Republican leadership to force Democrats to make an uncomfortable choice shortly before Election Day. "It's important to put people on the record," said House Majority Leader Tom DeLay of Texas.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It used to be that Saturday mornings were set aside for children to have fun -- watching cartoons, playing outdoors or just sitting idly around the house.That's no longer true in Washington, where children in virtually all the District of Columbia system's 146 schools are sitting in classes and hitting the books on Saturdays to boost their reading skills.As part of the Saturday STARS program (Students and Teachers Achieving Results and Success), the students sit in class from 9 a.m. to noon, with the same teachers and the same curriculum they see during weekday classes.
NEWS
April 24, 2010
The District of Columbia, which only last week seemed on the verge of finally achieving residents' long-cherished goal of a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, saw that dream deferred yet again when the compromise it had worked out with Congress collapsed Tuesday. House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer a Maryland Democrat who had supported the D.C. voting rights legislation, said the measure was being withdrawn because of a mischievous amendment tacked onto the bill that would have repealed most of the district's gun-control laws, a prospect that had sharply divided House Democrats and eroded support for the measure in the Senate.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | December 2, 2009
Former Maryland guard Terrell Stokes has been named a men's assistant coach at the University of the District of Columbia. Stokes most recently served four years as an assistant at Loyola. Stokes, a 2002 Maryland graduate, was a three-year starting point guard who helped the Terps to two NCAA Sweet 16 appearances. Honor: Navy men's guard Chris Harris was named ECAC Division I Player of the Week after averaging 27.0 points in two games last week, including 37 against Towson.
NEWS
By Dave Zirin | July 1, 2009
Who will be the next to die because our cities spend money on sports stadiums instead of basic infrastructure? Two years ago, my former college town, the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-St. Paul, was the site of thirteen needless fatalities when the Interstate 35W bridge collapsed. The tragedy occurred the same month that ground was broken on a $500 million stadium. Now, a mere 10-minute walk from my home, two Washington, D.C., Metro trains collided, killing nine and sending more than 75 to the hospital.
TRAVEL
April 26, 2009
Very Washington DC Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, $15.95 Diana Hollingsworth Gessler has forged a fascinating career out of illustrating and writing the text about fascinating American cities or states. Thus far, she has published books on New Orleans, Charleston, S.C., and California - and now Washington, D.C. Her work consists of handsome watercolors and oil paintings of prominent sites, and quirky descriptions of places, people and things. Often she emphasizes the lesser known or underappreciated figures of history, such as Pierre-Charles L'Enfant, who laid the blueprint for what would become Washington, but she also highlights some of the finest museums in the District of Columbia, from the Smithsonian to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and mentions such uniquely Washington events as the National Cherry Blossom Festival, held in spring.
NEWS
April 16, 2009
Two men dead in separate incidents A man who was shot in the leg Wednesday died from his injuries and another man was found dead in a vehicle in separate incidents on Baltimore's east and west sides, police said. The two homicides bring the city's count to 65 for the year, compared with 55 at this time last year. A man was found dead in a vehicle in the 1800 block of Aiken St., in the Oliver community. Three hours later, a man was shot in the leg in the unit block of Gorman Ave. in the Penrose community, and died later.
NEWS
By McClatchy Tribune | February 27, 2009
WASHINGTON -The District of Columbia moved a step closer yesterday to gaining full membership in the House of Representatives as the Senate voted 61-37 to give the nation's capital and Utah each a House seat. Yesterday's historic vote will be followed by a vote next week in the House, where a similar bill is expected to pass easily. President Barack Obama has expressed support for Washington voting rights and is expected to sign the bill when it reaches his desk. Residents and officials of the District of Columbia - a 61-square-mile area with a population of almost 600,000, about 55 percent of it black - have engaged in a long, slow fight for representation in Congress.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
BALTIMORE and Washington are often thought of as being many worlds - if not many miles - apart. But in terms of their recent urban history and challenges, they are more alike than different. To begin with, both cities lost roughly a quarter of their populations in the past 30 years, with most of the losses coming among middle-class families, black and white. And both suffered from a vicious downward spiral: a declining tax base, deteriorating services and then more flight and erosion of the tax base.
NEWS
By Gabrielle Russon and Gabrielle Russon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Donna Christensen, then new in Congress, was passionately opposed to the motion to impeach President Bill Clinton in December 1998. Whatever his mistakes, Christensen believed, Clinton did not deserve to be removed from office. But Christensen, who represents the Virgin Islands, could not vote. She was reduced to speaking on the House floor only after the impeachment vote and declared that if she could have, she would have voted no. "We're all generally forgotten or on the back burner," Christensen said recently, referring to herself and the four other nonvoting delegates in the House.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | January 2, 2009
How do you plan for a transportation tsunami? Where do you park 10,000 charter buses? How do you accommodate a possible 1 1/2 million would-be riders on a subway system with a capacity of about 1 million? How do you explain to people who are used to driving everywhere that their cars aren't welcome in downtown Washington? What happens on the roads, at the airports and aboard the trains when millions of visitors flood the capital region to witness history at the Jan. 20 inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States?
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | March 29, 2008
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold yesterday urged the state attorney general to halt the District of Columbia's construction of a $42 million juvenile detention center in Laurel, arguing that the city did not get state permission to proceed. Noting the conclusion of his legal staff, Leopold said in a news release that the District of Columbia is prohibited from rebuilding Oak Hill Youth Center without written consent from the secretary of juvenile services, and that could be grounds to sue. Construction on the 888-acre wooded tract just south of Fort Meade began in September.
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