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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2000
Baltimore District Judge Martin A. Kircher Sr. died of cancer Tuesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Homeland resident was 69. Judge Kircher was a former member of the House of Delegates from the city's old 3rd District. "He was the dean of our bench because he had been there the longest," said Administrative Judge Keith E. Mathews. "He was highly thought of by both attorneys and his fellow judges, most of whom had trained under him. There is certainly a lot of him in us." "He was extremely compassionate to all defendants," said District Judge Barbara B. Waxman, who got to know Judge Kircher when she appeared before him as a young attorney 20 years ago. "He had a good heart, and he brought it to the bench."
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
Charles J. Kelly Sr., a Harford County resident most of his life and the first District Court judge there, died Friday of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 75.Judge Kelly -- who also was a lawyer and a former Aberdeen town official -- was appointed to the bench in 1971, when the state's district court system was inaugurated. He served as a trial judge and the district's chief administrative judge until his retirement in 1984.He was remembered by those who worked with him as a jurist who respected people as much as the law in his courtroom.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1999
Charles E. Edmondson, a retired judge in Dorchester County, died Saturday of cancer at his Cambridge residence. He was 84.Judge Edmondson was appointed to the Dorchester County District Court by Gov. Marvin Mandel in 1971 and served as administrative judge of the District Court for the 2nd District, which includes Wicomico, Somerset and Worcester counties.In 1975, he was appointed to the Circuit Court for Dorchester County and served until 1984, when he reached the mandatory retirement age. He was recalled by the Court of Appeals and continued to sit in District and Circuit courts past 80."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
Frederick W. Invernizzi, a retired Baltimore District Court judge and longtime professor at the University of Maryland Law School, died of congestive heart failure and pneumonia Monday at University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville. He was 95. Judge Invernizzi was born in Somerville, Mass., and moved to Baltimore with his family in 1917. He was a 1928 graduate of City College and worked his way through the University of Maryland, College Park with jobs in the campus library, as a fraternity house cook and as a golf caddy.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The NFL announced Thursday that former United States District Judge Barbara S. Jones has been appointed by the league to hear and decide the suspension appeal filed by the NFL Players Association on behalf of Ray Rice. “We are grateful to Judge Jones for taking on this role,” said league commissioner Roger Goodell, who suspended the former Ravens running back indefinitely after video came out Sept. 8 of Rice assaulting his then-fiancee. “She will have our full cooperation as she hears and decides this appeal.” Goodell was asked by the players' union to recuse himself from the hearing because he'll likely be a witness in the case.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
Ellen Lipton Hollander, a veteran Maryland state court judge, and James K. Bredar, a federal magistrate judge, have been nominated by President Barack Obama for U.S. District Court judgeships, the White House announced Wednesday. Hollander, 60, has been a member of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals since 1994. Before that, she served five years as a Baltimore Circuit Court judge. She would fill the seat that opened up last year when U.S. Judge Andre Davis, a Democratic nominee, moved to the federal appeals court.
EXPLORE
January 12, 2013
  Gov. Martin O'Malley has appointed Brian David Green to the district court for Carroll County. Green has served as attorney with the Office of the Public Defender in Carroll County for the past 23 years, according to a press release from the governor's office. An adjunct professor for the Criminal Practice Clinic at the University of Baltimore School of Law, Green has also worked for the Shemer Bar Review since 1999, according to the release. He began his legal career as an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore City from 1987-1990.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
Judge Carl W. Bacharach, an associate judge of the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore, died of a heart attack yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 69.Remembered by a colleague on the bench as "a very compassionate person who loved his fellow man and hated man's inhumanity against man," Judge Bacharach died about 6:30 a.m. yesterday during emergency heart surgery."He had had three heart bypass operations in the past, but I guess they just couldn't pull off the miracle a fourth time," said Judge Martin A. Kircher of the District Court for Baltimore.
NEWS
October 10, 1990
Judge Fred E. Waldrop, who served on the District Court bench in Baltimore County from its establishment in 1971 until his retirement in 1984, died of cancer Monday at his home on Drawbridge Court in Catonsville. He was 63.Services for Judge Waldrop will be held at 1 p.m. tomorrow at the Leroy M. and Russell C. Witzke funeral establishment, 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville.He retired on medical disability after tests showed that damage from an apparent cerebral hemorrhage in 1981, for which he was hospitalized several months, and the pressures of his work could combine to endanger his health.
NEWS
July 29, 2001
Vern J. Munger, 85, District Court judge Vern J. Munger, a retired District Court judge, died Wednesday at Stella Maris Hospice of complications from a fall. He was 85 and had been a nine-month resident of the Masonic Home of Maryland in Cockeysville. He had previously lived in Towson. Named an assistant city solicitor in 1959, he was appointed to the People's Court by Gov. J. Millard Tawes in 1967. He later served on the District Court of Maryland and retired about 20 years ago. In 1970, he was featured in newspaper articles when he left the bench to inspect the home of a woman who was suing a home-improvement company for shoddy work.
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