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By Tricia Bishop | June 12, 2012
The John R. Hargrove Sr. building of Baltimore's district court closed shortly after 9 a.m. Tuesday because of a nearby water main break that left the facility without water. It's unclear when the building,  on the 700 block of E. Patapsco Ave.,  will reopen and resume hearing cases. Bail reviews were transferred to the Borgerding district court location at 5800 Wabash Ave, and other cases were postponed, said judiciary spokeswoman Terri Bolling. The water main break occurred on the 3600 block of Brooklyn Ave., Bolling said.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
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EXPLORE
January 12, 2013
  Gov. Martin O'Malley has appointed Brian David Green to the district court for Carroll County. Green has served as attorney with the Office of the Public Defender in Carroll County for the past 23 years, according to a press release from the governor's office. An adjunct professor for the Criminal Practice Clinic at the University of Baltimore School of Law, Green has also worked for the Shemer Bar Review since 1999, according to the release. He began his legal career as an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore City from 1987-1990.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
James Rogers Miller Jr., a former state delegate from Montgomery County who spent 15 years as a federal district judge in Baltimore, died of congestive heart failure June 25 at HeartFields Assisted Living at Easton. He was 83. "Judge Miller was an outstanding and brilliant jurist," said U.S. District Judge Ellen L. Hollander, who clerked for Judge Miller in the 1970s. "He tirelessly and skillfully pursued the just resolution of every case. He had an unwavering commitment to the rule of law and an uncompromising integrity.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
The Annapolis District Court building closed at noon Thursday due to a lack of heat, and the building is expected to reopen Friday morning. Officials said the courthouse, on Rowe Boulevard at Taylor Avenue, was having mechanical problems. Repairs were expected to be completed Thursday, said judiciary spokeswoman Angelita Plemmer. The problem affected only the District Court building in Annapolis. The other District Court in Anne Arundel County, located in Glen Burnie, remained open, officials said.
NEWS
February 15, 1995
The message from last fall's election results was unmistakeably loud and clear: Americans are tired of the usual politics that makes ill use of public dollars. This point was made with particular force by the nation's more conservative communities, one of which would certainly be Dundalk.We wonder, then, how the residents of that east Baltimore County community feel about the proposal by their state delegates to continue the wasteful expense of tax dollars on the shabby and unnecessary District Court in Dundalk.
NEWS
By Madison Park | April 6, 2008
Seven candidates have been recommended as "most fully qualified" for an appointment to the Harford County District Court. Their names have been forwarded to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who will appoint one of them to fill a vacancy left by Judge Angela M. Eaves, who was elevated to the Harford County Circuit Court. Harford County's Judicial Nominating Commission recommended: Yolanda Lauranzon Curtin, Theodore Mark Hart, Susan Hower Hazlett, Charles Edward Kearney Jr., Melissa Lazarich Lambert, Carl Ridgeley Schlaich and Roger Joseph Sullivan.
NEWS
March 3, 2003
Julie Anne Wilcox, a District Court commissioner, died Feb. 24 of cancer at her Elkton home. She was 52. Born in Wilmington, Del., she was a 1968 graduate of the Tome School in Port Deposit and earned a degree in personnel management from the University of North Texas. She earned a master's degree from Central Michigan University. A former Johns Hopkins Hospital personnel employee, she became a District Court commissioner in Elkton about eight years ago. She was active in the Cecil County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and in the Head of the Elk chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 24, 1991
The Anne Arundel County District Court must find a new home because of a statewide reorganization of courthouse employees.Voters passed a referendum in November that transferred supervision of the Clerkof the Court's office in the 23 counties and Baltimore from the comptroller to the judicial branch. That doubled the size of the Circuit Court's work force and requires more administrators, District Court Chief Judge Robert Sweeney said.Sweeney said judicial officials want to build a new district courthouse and convert the existing court building, adjacent to the stateCourt of Appeals, into administrative offices for the state court system.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
Judge Carl W. Bacharach, an associate judge of the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore, died of a heart attack yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 69.Remembered by a colleague on the bench as "a very compassionate person who loved his fellow man and hated man's inhumanity against man," Judge Bacharach died about 6:30 a.m. yesterday during emergency heart surgery."He had had three heart bypass operations in the past, but I guess they just couldn't pull off the miracle a fourth time," said Judge Martin A. Kircher of the District Court for Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
A Baltimore County police cadet stole drugs with a street value of more than $125,000 from the evidence vault at the department's headquarters and sold the drugs to two cousins, according to charging documents and police officials. Nicholas Michael Ishmael, 20, stole evidence related to at least 15 cases, including Oxycodone tablets, cocaine, morphine and other drugs, according to documents filed in District Court. After a "very lengthy investigation," Chief James W. Johnson said, the department is in the process of reviewing "every piece of evidence in our property evidence unit, and we intend to review all policies and procedures, and technologies and other techniques we can use to prevent this from happening in the future.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Criminal suspects in Maryland will have free access to lawyers at their first court appearances as soon as July, a top judiciary official said Tuesday, as the state struggles to comply with a court order that has been delayed for months amid concerns about its cost. The change, mandated by the Maryland Court of Appeals as a way to treat suspects more fairly before trial, has challenged all three branches of government. The General Assembly could not agree on a plan to restructure the pretrial release system, opting instead to put aside $10 million to pay for lawyers.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A judge from Prince George's County has been named the next chief judge of the state's District Court. Judge John P. Morrissey, 49, who has served as an associate judge since 2005, will succeed District Court Chief Judge Ben C. Clyburn when Clyburn retires next month. Morrissey, who was born in Washington, D.C. and has lived in P.G. County for more than 40 years, will oversee the court's 34 locations and nearly 2,000 employees, including 116 state judges. The court is typically the first point of contact for members of the public who interact with the state courts system.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 12, 2014
With a little over three weeks left in the General Assembly session this year, legislative leaders are scrambling to come up with a response to a potentially costly Court of Appeals ruling requiring legal representation for all criminal defendants during bail hearings. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said Wednesday that he and House Speaker Michael E. Busch had agreed to work together to try to avoid a legislative impasse on the issue. The state now provides attorneys only at hearings before judges.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Court of Appeals has extended the deadline by which the state must make sure criminal defendants have lawyers by their side during bail hearings before District Court commissioners. Currently, the state provides attorneys only at hearings before judges. But the Court of Appeals ruled in September that they must be provided earlier in the process, at the initial hearings before the commissioners. State officials say that would cost $30 million a year — money they say they don't have.
NEWS
November 10, 2002
Crofton resident John P. McKenna was appointed last week to the District Court bench in Anne Arundel County by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. McKenna, 49, said he will close his private law practice in Greenbelt within a month to fill one of two vacancies created by the appointments of Judges David S. Bruce and Paul A. Hackner to the Circuit Court this spring. McKenna grew up in Crofton and attended Arundel High School before graduating from Georgetown University and the University of Maryland School of Law. He was an assistant state's attorney in Prince George's County for seven years, then a county attorney there for three years before going into private practice.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2000
J. Michael Wachs, a family law master for the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, has been named to the county District Court bench. Wachs, 38, will fill the vacancy created this summer when Nancy Davis-Loomis was elevated to the Circuit Court. For the past two years, Wachs has been hearing juvenile crime, child support and similar cases. Before that, he was an assistant public defender and in private practice in Annapolis. Gov. Parris N. Glendening praised Wachs' experience in making the appointment Thursday, saying he is "extremely well regarded by the bench and bar."
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 11, 2014
While reading court documents recently, I had one of those "Wait-What?" moments. That's where you're reading along, or listening to an explanation, and you suddenly say, incredulously: "Wait. What?" That is, please stop and tell me what I just read or heard was correct - that, in the case at hand, a District Court commissioner told an Annapolis police corporal to change the reported description of a man wanted for first-degree assault. Absurd as that sounds, this apparent transgression is described in the city of Annapolis' official responses to a false arrest case.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
The Court of Appeals pushed back a deadline Friday for authorities in Baltimore to expand criminal defendants' access to lawyers, but one of the state's top judges said she does not expect to alter the court's underlying ruling that suspects have a right to counsel at all bail hearings. The ruling last year, which has set off a wide-ranging debate on how to handle the 175,000 or so people arrested in Maryland each year, could take effect as soon as Tuesday. District Court administrators — the defendants in the case — as well as the governor and Senate president had hoped the hearing would be a chance to reverse the ruling, which is vexing policymakers as they try to figure out a way to comply.
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