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NEWS
July 29, 2010
To the family and friends of Stephen Pitcairn, we Baltimoreans recognize that this is a very personal loss for you and we send our sympathy. We ask for your understanding as we use Mr. Pitcairn's death as a symbol of what is terribly wrong in the city where we live and work, and as a rallying cry for change. To the witnesses who came forth and identified the murderers, thank you for your courage. It seems to be the only flicker of hope in this tragedy. Charlotte F. Gerczak, Baltimore
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NEWS
June 26, 2014
I can't remember a primary in which I didn't vote. I can't even recall a primary in which I didn't volunteer to help a candidate. Yesterday was no different. Therefore it was heartbreaking to stand on a corner to hand out material and have no one to give it to. Not only did it make me sad, it made me angry ( "Excuse us while we don't bother to vote," June 25). Dan Rodricks points out the struggles voters elsewhere endure to cast their ballots. However, his lecture won't change the American culture of detachment and selfishness.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
The distress call over marine band radio channel 16 was alarming: A male voice reported calmly that his 28-foot Sea Ray power boat "Susie Q," with three children on board, had lost power and was taking on water somewhere on Middle River. That triggered an eight-hour search Saturday that involved three helicopters, at least six boats and additional shore units from multiple agencies. But no trace of a sinking boat or its occupants has been found. Nor were there any reports of missing persons or overdue boats that Coast Guard or Baltimore County Police investigators could link to the distress call.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Even as the housing market recovers nationwide, echoes of the mortgage lending crisis continue to reverberate in Maryland, home to the nation's second-highest foreclosure rate last month. One in every 527 housing units in the state was touched by a foreclosure filing in March, the 21st consecutive month of year-over-year gains and the second highest rate in the country behind Florida, according to a monthly report by RealtyTrac, a California real estate firm. Meanwhile, median home prices in the Baltimore region remained flat, and distressed properties continued to make up an elevated share of sales, according to new reports on the regional housing market released Thursday.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Schuett | June 10, 1997
GIBSONBURG, Ohio -- Spend a day in my 8th-grade classroom watching the boys acting like just what they are -- little boys -- and listening to the girls chastise them for behaving like infants. ''Grow up!'' they say.It's fascinating to observe the girls taking care of the boys, lending them paper and pens and collecting their books for them when the bell rings for the next class. They complain about it, but they do it anyway. If you ask why, they'll respond with: ''Somebody has to take care of them,'' or ''I don't know.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 23, 1993
It was only the distress of Tracor that prevented Admiral Inman from paying his housekeeper's Social Security taxes.The good news is that Baltimore has a new police commissioner. The bad news is that a great deal is going to be expected of him.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1999
When the S.S. Vestris foundered off the Virginia Capes in 1928 with the loss of 110 lives, it wasn't for lack of a telegraph officer urgently tapping out Morse code.But the SOS came too late -- by six hours, the British Board of Trade later decided. The victims, including Capt. William J. Carey, may have died because he delayed ordering the chief wireless officer to send his distress signal.The dramatic story of the overloaded Liverpool ship -- its rolling in huge seas, its agonized calls for help, its death plunge and the rescue by other ships of two-thirds of the passengers and crew -- illustrates the role Morse code has played for a century in saving thousands of lives at sea.Morse code, as of Feb. 1, is no longer the formal communications mode on the high seas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 11, 2011
Don't worry. It's nothing $1 million can't cure. Baltimore City Councilwoman Belinda Conaway says in her lawsuit against Examiner columnist Adam Meister that his March column , which accused her of living in Baltimore County instead of in an extended-family household in the city, has taken an emotional toll on her. Conaway has been "having trouble sleeping at night, having difficulty dealing with some others, and became short-tempered and...
NEWS
October 22, 2000
C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, Baltimore County executive, spoke recently with Richard C. Gross, editor of the Opinion Commentary page, about the necessity of using the power of eminent domain. WHY IS IT necessary to have to use eminent domain and upset homes and families? Is there another way that you could achieve the same thing? Eminent domain is just one tool that we're attempting to use to help neighborhood renewal in areas of the county that have been in distress even with this good economy.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With the CIA and FBI determined to learn whether Aldrich H. Ames had confederates inside the intelligence agency, the accused man is showing his first willingness to cooperate with investigators -- but only if they recommend leniency for his wife, the Los Angeles Times learned yesterday.But Mr. Ames has virtually no chance of negotiating leniency for himself, considering the damage investigators believe the 31-year CIA veteran caused to U.S. intelligence interests and his possible complicity in the deaths of U.S. intelligence operatives in Russia.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Dolan Co., which owns The Daily Record, plans to file for bankruptcy-law protection next week, the Minneapolis-based company announced Thursday. Dolan, a professional services and business information firm, showed signs of mounting financial distress in recent months. It reported losses, hired a chief restructuring officer and in January saw its stock delisted from the New York Stock Exchange as a result of a consistently low share price. Dolan said it had reached agreement with key secured lenders on a "comprehensive balance sheet restructuring.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Until his family's foundation started building youth athletic fields in economically distressed areas around the country, Cal Ripken Jr. had no idea just how many kids needed a place to play. The Orioles great had already spent a good portion of his post-playing career teaching baseball to kids. They came to Ripken Stadium in Aberdeen by the thousands for clinics and tournaments. But when the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation looked into building fields as a next step for its youth outreach, Ripken recognized a broader mission.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
A George Mason University study of six cities in "fiscal distress" has concluded that Baltimore is demonstrating "resiliency" and is on "reasonably solid financial footing. " The report, which comes after Detroit's municipal bankruptcy, analyzed the finances of the Motor City and five others: Baltimore, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Providence, R.I., and San Bernardino, Calif. The academics looked at measures such as bond ratings, debt levels and cash flow, determining that Baltimore - which has embarked on a 10-year financial overhaul - was in the best fiscal condition of the cities studied.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Four Maryland organizations won the right to raise $135 million for community development projects by selling federal tax credits, the Treasury Department said Wednesday. The New Markets tax credits help developers fund projects intended to add jobs and bring other improvements to distressed areas. Investors purchasing the credits from New Markets recipients receive a break on their federal income taxes. The local recipients are Baltimore-based CDF Development, a Cordish Cos. affiliate that intends to invest in retail and mixed-use projects; Baltimore-based Harbor Bankshares Corp., which will offer below-market-rate loans to projects in low-income neighborhoods; Columbia-based ESIC New Markets Partners, which focuses on health care centers, healthy-food options and mixed-use developments; and Bethesda-based Mid-City Community CDE, whose investments will include transit-oriented businesses.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
The U.S. Coast Guard suspended a search of the Chesapeake Bay on Thursday for a vessel that sent out a distress call Wednesday evening. Coast Guard and local officials roamed 180 square miles over a 12-hour period, focusing on two places in the Bay where the call originated, in the mouth of the Choptank River and between Deale Beach and North Beach, Petty Officer Jason Stanley, a search and rescue controller working the case, said in a statement....
NEWS
October 27, 2012
There is a historical precedent for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra reducing the number of scheduled performances in times of economic distress ("Tough times for the BSO," Oct. 22). During the Great Depression, when the orchestra was supported solely by government funds, the appropriation was reduced from $33,000 to $25,000 in 1931 and 1932, and to $23,200 in 1933. Those cuts necessitated a reduction in the number of concerts each year, from six to four. But the shortened schedule also enabled the orchestra to maintain musicians' salaries and, in fact, to add nine players in 1931.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
There is a historical precedent for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra reducing the number of scheduled performances in times of economic distress ("Tough times for the BSO," Oct. 22). During the Great Depression, when the orchestra was supported solely by government funds, the appropriation was reduced from $33,000 to $25,000 in 1931 and 1932, and to $23,200 in 1933. Those cuts necessitated a reduction in the number of concerts each year, from six to four. But the shortened schedule also enabled the orchestra to maintain musicians' salaries and, in fact, to add nine players in 1931.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 25, 1996
If you were driving north on the Jones Falls Expressway and spotted a man walking south along the shoulder, would you find it odd? Would you care? Would you pull over and ask if he needed help? If you had a cellular phone, would you report him to police?My answers to those questions are no, not too much, probably not and maybe. I've seen young men walking along highways and, unless they appeared to be in distress, I never gave them a second thought.Two years ago, while traveling through New York state, I passed a man and woman holding a baby (with no vehicle in sight)
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
About 100 employees of Big Huge Games, a Timonium-based maker of video games, lost their jobs this week as the studio and its Rhode Island-based parent company abruptly shut down because of financial problems. The 12-year-old company was one of the anchors of Baltimore County's well-established video game industry, which has grown steadily since the 1980s as the popularity of computer and console games has skyrocketed. Big Huge Games was owned by 38 Studios, a Providence, R.I.-based company founded by former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling in 2006.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
The Baltimore region saw a double-digit jump in average home sale prices in April, the most in six years — but the gain was driven by a shrinking supply of cheap foreclosures rather than a resurgence in value. Just one in 10 homes sold in the Baltimore area last month was bank-owned, down significantly from the nearly one in four a year earlier, according to numbers released Thursday by RealEstate Business Intelligence, a subsidiary of the regional multiple listing service. That pumped up the average price for a home sold in April to $281,000, a 10 percent increase over a year earlier.
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