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Distinguished Flying Cross

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 4, 2007
William M. Cover, a decorated World War II pilot and retired home builder, died Sunday after surgery for an aneurysm at St. Joseph Medical Center. The former longtime Hamilton resident was 84. Mr. Cover was born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue. After graduating from City College in 1940, he worked at Bendix Corp. before enlisting in the Army Air Forces in 1943. After completing flight training, Mr. Cover was sent to India where he joined the 11th Cargo Combat Squadron flying C-46s and C-47s over the Himalayas.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Jerome L. Feeley Jr., a decorated World War II Navy pilot who later owned and operated a kitchen design firm, died Wednesday in his sleep at a daughter's Parkville home. He was 89. Mr. Feeley was born in Baltimore and lived in West Baltimore until 1934, when his family moved to a Guilford Avenue rowhouse. He was a graduate of the Cathedral School on Mulberry Street, and Calvert Hall College High School in 1940, where he was an outstanding basketball and football player.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | August 14, 2009
Martin Herman Stephan, a decorated World War II pilot who flew 51 missions and was a retired engineer, died of a heart attack Aug. 7 at his Ellicott City home. He was 86. Born in a suburb of Leipzig, Bohlitz-Ehrenburg, Germany, he immigrated to Baltimore in 1924 with his mother and sister. He grew up on Palermo Avenue and graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1942. Mr. Stephan worked for Baltimore Gas & Electric briefly before entering the Aviation Cadet Corps. He reported for cadet training at Maxwell Field in Stuttgart, Ark., and received his commission in 1943.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | August 14, 2009
Martin Herman Stephan, a decorated World War II pilot who flew 51 missions and was a retired engineer, died of a heart attack Aug. 7 at his Ellicott City home. He was 86. Born in a suburb of Leipzig, Bohlitz-Ehrenburg, Germany, he immigrated to Baltimore in 1924 with his mother and sister. He grew up on Palermo Avenue and graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1942. Mr. Stephan worked for Baltimore Gas & Electric briefly before entering the Aviation Cadet Corps. He reported for cadet training at Maxwell Field in Stuttgart, Ark., and received his commission in 1943.
NEWS
December 27, 2004
On December 20, 2004, ROLAND E. WILHELM brother of the late Margaret Elizabeth Myer, Stanley H. Wilhelm, Bertha Becker, Helen Louge and Elsie English, uncle of Estelle Harrison, Mary Jane Reeder, Esther Schmitz, Roland Wilhelm and Bonnie Mae Fewster. During WWII he was a member of the Army Air Corp as a nose gunner on the B24, he was awarded the distinguished Flying Cross for flying 39 missions. After the war Roland worked as a plumber until retirement. Services from the ELINE FUNERAL HOME, 934 S. Main Street, Hampstead, on Tuesday 1 P.M. Interment Forest Baptist Church Cemetery.
NEWS
November 2, 2002
John G. Hoey Sr., a retired insurance salesman who earned the Distinguished Flying Cross while serving in the Royal Air Force during World War II, died of heart failure Thursday at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 84. Mr. Hoey, a longtime resident of Keswick Road in Roland Park, was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland. After graduating from high school, he left Ireland for England, and enlisted in the RAF in 1938. As a radio operator and bombardier, he made history when he was aboard one of the first planes to bomb Germany.
NEWS
July 4, 1996
David McCampbell,86, the Navy's all-time leading ace with 34 aerial victories during World War II, died Sunday in Riviera Beach, Fla.In 1944, his squadron saw almost six months of continuous combat and participated in two major air-sea battles. On one mission, he shot down nine planes. "I just kept on shooting," he said.He was awarded the Navy Cross, the Silver Star and the Distinguished Flying Cross. President Franklin D. Roosevelt presented him with the Medal of Honor.Mr. McCampbell's 34 victories made him the nation's fourth-leading ace of all time.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
Michael J. Marino, a highly decorated Navy aviator who participated in some of the most significant Pacific naval air battles of World War II, died of cancer Thursday at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center. He was 82. Mr. Marino was born in Baltimore, the son of an immigrant stonemason from Palermo, Italy, and grew up in the home his father built on First Avenue in Brooklyn. He was a 1939 graduate of Glen Burnie High School, where he played second base for the school's baseball team.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2001
Harry A. Meyd, former Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. manager and decorated World War II fighter pilot, died Monday of prostate cancer at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 80. He began his C & P Telephone career in 1940 working as a cable splicer and installer. He later was promoted to the commercial division and managed the company's Bel Air business office. He retired in 1982. He served as president of the Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce while living in Bel Air, and the Telephone Pioneers of Maryland.
NEWS
February 6, 2004
Christopher George Newberger, a retired Irvington postman and decorated World War II bombardier, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at Brightview Assisted Living in Catonsville. The Woodlawn resident was 87. Born in Baltimore and raised on Monastery Avenue, he was a 1934 graduate of City College. He was an inventory worker for the old Montgomery Ward mail-order house on Washington Boulevard before enlisting in 1943 in the Army Air Forces. He logged more than 700 hours of flying time over enemy lands in World War II. A first lieutenant with the 738th bomb squadron, he took part in raids on the Munich Motor Works, the Ploesti Oil Fields in eastern Romania and the Latisana railroad bridge in Italy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 4, 2007
William M. Cover, a decorated World War II pilot and retired home builder, died Sunday after surgery for an aneurysm at St. Joseph Medical Center. The former longtime Hamilton resident was 84. Mr. Cover was born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue. After graduating from City College in 1940, he worked at Bendix Corp. before enlisting in the Army Air Forces in 1943. After completing flight training, Mr. Cover was sent to India where he joined the 11th Cargo Combat Squadron flying C-46s and C-47s over the Himalayas.
NEWS
December 27, 2004
On December 20, 2004, ROLAND E. WILHELM brother of the late Margaret Elizabeth Myer, Stanley H. Wilhelm, Bertha Becker, Helen Louge and Elsie English, uncle of Estelle Harrison, Mary Jane Reeder, Esther Schmitz, Roland Wilhelm and Bonnie Mae Fewster. During WWII he was a member of the Army Air Corp as a nose gunner on the B24, he was awarded the distinguished Flying Cross for flying 39 missions. After the war Roland worked as a plumber until retirement. Services from the ELINE FUNERAL HOME, 934 S. Main Street, Hampstead, on Tuesday 1 P.M. Interment Forest Baptist Church Cemetery.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
Michael J. Marino, a highly decorated Navy aviator who participated in some of the most significant Pacific naval air battles of World War II, died of cancer Thursday at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center. He was 82. Mr. Marino was born in Baltimore, the son of an immigrant stonemason from Palermo, Italy, and grew up in the home his father built on First Avenue in Brooklyn. He was a 1939 graduate of Glen Burnie High School, where he played second base for the school's baseball team.
NEWS
February 6, 2004
Christopher George Newberger, a retired Irvington postman and decorated World War II bombardier, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at Brightview Assisted Living in Catonsville. The Woodlawn resident was 87. Born in Baltimore and raised on Monastery Avenue, he was a 1934 graduate of City College. He was an inventory worker for the old Montgomery Ward mail-order house on Washington Boulevard before enlisting in 1943 in the Army Air Forces. He logged more than 700 hours of flying time over enemy lands in World War II. A first lieutenant with the 738th bomb squadron, he took part in raids on the Munich Motor Works, the Ploesti Oil Fields in eastern Romania and the Latisana railroad bridge in Italy.
NEWS
November 2, 2002
John G. Hoey Sr., a retired insurance salesman who earned the Distinguished Flying Cross while serving in the Royal Air Force during World War II, died of heart failure Thursday at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 84. Mr. Hoey, a longtime resident of Keswick Road in Roland Park, was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland. After graduating from high school, he left Ireland for England, and enlisted in the RAF in 1938. As a radio operator and bombardier, he made history when he was aboard one of the first planes to bomb Germany.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
Robert R. Ayres Jr., whose World War II exploits as a Marine Corps dive-bomber pilot earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross for action against an enemy force of Japanese destroyers, died Saturday of heart failure at Kent & Queen Anne's Hospital in Chestertown. He was 82. Mr. Ayres was 22 when he dropped out of the University of Maryland in his junior year to enlist in the Marine Corps as an aviation cadet in the spring of 1941. Trained to fly SBD Douglas Dauntless dive bombers, Mr. Ayres was assigned to the Hawaiian Islands in 1942 and to Guadalcanal in 1943.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
Robert R. Ayres Jr., whose World War II exploits as a Marine Corps dive-bomber pilot earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross for action against an enemy force of Japanese destroyers, died Saturday of heart failure at Kent & Queen Anne's Hospital in Chestertown. He was 82. Mr. Ayres was 22 when he dropped out of the University of Maryland in his junior year to enlist in the Marine Corps as an aviation cadet in the spring of 1941. Trained to fly SBD Douglas Dauntless dive bombers, Mr. Ayres was assigned to the Hawaiian Islands in 1942 and to Guadalcanal in 1943.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Jerome L. Feeley Jr., a decorated World War II Navy pilot who later owned and operated a kitchen design firm, died Wednesday in his sleep at a daughter's Parkville home. He was 89. Mr. Feeley was born in Baltimore and lived in West Baltimore until 1934, when his family moved to a Guilford Avenue rowhouse. He was a graduate of the Cathedral School on Mulberry Street, and Calvert Hall College High School in 1940, where he was an outstanding basketball and football player.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2001
Harry A. Meyd, former Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. manager and decorated World War II fighter pilot, died Monday of prostate cancer at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 80. He began his C & P Telephone career in 1940 working as a cable splicer and installer. He later was promoted to the commercial division and managed the company's Bel Air business office. He retired in 1982. He served as president of the Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce while living in Bel Air, and the Telephone Pioneers of Maryland.
NEWS
July 4, 1996
David McCampbell,86, the Navy's all-time leading ace with 34 aerial victories during World War II, died Sunday in Riviera Beach, Fla.In 1944, his squadron saw almost six months of continuous combat and participated in two major air-sea battles. On one mission, he shot down nine planes. "I just kept on shooting," he said.He was awarded the Navy Cross, the Silver Star and the Distinguished Flying Cross. President Franklin D. Roosevelt presented him with the Medal of Honor.Mr. McCampbell's 34 victories made him the nation's fourth-leading ace of all time.
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