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By Jacques Kelly | November 12, 1990
In the days when Route 1 was the East Coast's main highway, northbound motorists knew they were just outside Baltimore when the whiff of a barroom floated into their DeSotos and Packards.The pungent smell of fermenting grains and yeast settled over Relay and St. Denis in the Patapsco River Valley along the old Washington Boulevard. The odor of Calvert whiskey marked roads, railroads and villages from the 1930s through the 1980s. When you smelled John Barleycorn, you knew Baltimore was not far away.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
So much of my time is taken up with doctoring sick prose, and complaining here about suspect advice on grammar and usage, that I thought it might be salutary to take a look, for once, at some good prose.  Here is the opening paragraph from "Josie's Well," an article by John McPhee on Scotch whisky first published in Holiday  in 1970 and reprinted in his collection Pieces of the Frame. The text The Laphroaig distillery is on the southern shore of Islay, one of the isles of Argyll, in the Inner Hebrides.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2010
Charles Wilbur "Stretch" Crisp, a retired distillery supervisor and collector of vintage Jaguars, was pronounced dead Saturday at Chester County Hospital in West Chester, Pa. The Woodlawn resident was 66. Mr. Crisp was attending a Cars of England at Oakbourne Mansion classic automobile meet in Westtown, Pa., when, while accepting an award for one of his Jaguars with his wife, he was stricken with the massive heart attack that took his life,...
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
A fire inside the former Seagram's plant in Dundalk on Saturday night remains under investigation after a man jumped three stories to escape the blaze and suffered life-threatening injuries, Baltimore County officials said. Investigators said Monday they still did not know what the man was doing at the vacant facility, and they plan to conduct more security checks there. Over the past five years, firefighters have responded to reports of fire there about a dozen times, said Elise Armacost, a county public safety spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
A trucking facility planned at the site of the former Calvert Distillery has residents in nearby Relay worried about its effects on their community.The neighbors' uneasiness is heightened, they say, because they know very little about the facility to be built at 5101 Washington Blvd. by TNT Redstar Express, a trucking company based in Newark, N.J.Some residents believe the presence of the trucking facility would mean more traffic from nearby Interstates 95 and 195 and U.S. 1, and increased noise for those living in the small, historic community.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 17, 2001
ALBANY, N.Y. - Nearly every time a shovel breaks ground for downtown development here, it strikes something from the deep past: In recent years, archaeologists hired to do pre-construction surveys have found Dutch cemeteries, American Indian artifacts and, most recently, an 18th-century rum distillery. And just as often, the shovel keeps on going: All of those discoveries have been unceremoniously reburied. Recently, the city dumped backfill over the distillery's vine-tied wooden fermentation vats to make way for a six-story parking garage.
TRAVEL
By Rosemary McClure and Rosemary McClure,Los Angeles Times | December 2, 2007
DUBLIN, IRELAND Those plump little cherubs smiling rapturously from the depths of dark baroque paintings have reason to be happy, I thought as I listened to tour guide Niall Stewart expound on "the angels' share," a term used to describe the amount of Irish whiskey that evaporates daily while aging in casks. "No one knows what the angels actually do with their share," said Stewart, as we began our tour of the Old Jameson Distillery here. "But we do know 6,000 bottles of Jameson are lost a day floating in the air."
NEWS
May 11, 2000
LAWRENCEBURG, KY. -- Who would have thought bourbon and water would be a problem in Kentucky? A fire at a distillery warehouse destroyed more than 17,000 oaken barrels of Wild Turkey and sent flaming bourbon into the water supply, forcing schools and businesses in this town of 8,000 to close yesterday. The liquor never got into the tap water, because the water plant shut down as the bourbon - some of it superbly well-aged at 15 years old - splashed by on its way into the Kentucky River.
NEWS
January 1, 2008
Mary Louise "Wheezie" Gutman, who collected English ceramics and donated them to two Baltimore art museums, died of heart disease Sunday at her Lutherville home. She was 88. Born Mary Louise Fleischmann in Baltimore and raised in Reservoir Hill and Mount Washington, she was a 1937 Park School graduate. She attended Goucher College. In 1942, representing the Suburban Club, she won the city women's singles and doubles tennis championship. She later played golf and was a past president of the Women's Golf Association of Baltimore.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
While George Washington may have been "First in War, First in Peace, and First in the Hearts of his Countrymen," in his 1799 eulogy to the late squire of Mount Vernon, Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee failed to mention that he was also the first president to own a distillery. "There were lots of little distilleries in the 18th century that made whiskey, but what makes Washington's unique was that it was the largest distillery in the country at the time. This was a major commercial enterprise," said Dennis J. Pogue, assistant director for preservation at Mount Vernon in Virginia.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
A Baltimore County developer said he has abandoned pursuit of building "big box" stores at the site of the North Point Government Center in Dundalk and moving those offices to the site of a nearby former whiskey distillery that he owns. John Vontran of Perry Hall said this week that he had dropped the idea, which received mixed reviews in the community and no public backing from county officials, including the district councilman. "It was just an idea," Vontran said after a public hearing at Patapsco High School at which opponents outnumbered supporters of his remaining project: a mix of senior housing and offices at the old Joseph E. Seagram & Sons property on Sollers Point Road in Dundalk.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
No one makes whiskey any longer on Sollers Point Road in Dundalk, where the old distillery stands empty, the weeds poke through the paving and graffiti marks the brick walls. Joseph E. Seagram & Sons closed its bottling plant there in the late 1980s, and it's been empty for years, considered an eyesore by many neighbors and the scene of several recent fires. The latest owner of these desolate 14.5 acres is planning a redevelopment, and one of his ideas involves moving county-owned offices there, freeing up a nearby property for "big box" stores at one of the biggest crossroads in Dundalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Sloop Betty, the flagship spirit of new Maryland distillery Blackwater Distilling, has some fans outside of the state. The trade magazine The Tasting Panel gave it a 94-point rating in its July issue. In a small blurb in its review section, the magazine describes the vodka as "lush and rich with creamy texture and lovely grain notes; complex, elegant and dense with subtle vanilla space; long, deep and seamless. " Of all the spirits reviewed in the issue, the vodka got the highest rating besides Pappy Van Winkle's Family Reserve Bourbon.
TRAVEL
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
There's no such thing as a bad time to visit George Washington's Mount Vernon, the historic estate of our first president. Still, spring seems to be a natural fit, as the expansive gardens begin to show signs of renewed life, new lambs frolic in the paddock and stable area, and a host of special events prepare for launch. "We have 50 acres for our visitors to explore," said Melissa Wood, media relations manager for George Washington's Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens. "There really couldn't be a better time of year to be outside and experience George Washington's home than spring.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
Blackwater Distilling is set to begin bottling Sloop Betty vodka in Stevensville next month, marking the resumption after nearly 30 years of the proud tradition of distilling spirits in Maryland. "There's something about bringing that industry back that means something," Christopher Cook , a partner with his brother Jonathan in Blackwater, told Baltimore Sun reporter Jill Rosen recently. During rye whiskey's golden age, connoisseurs across the land instantly associated Wight's Sherbrook, Old Reserve, Ryebrook, Mount Vernon, Sherwood Pure Rye, Hunter's — "First Over the Bars" — and Pikesville Rye, to name only a few that were once distilled here, with Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 10, 2010
Charles H. Klaus Sr., a retired stationary engineer and lifelong Woodlawn resident, died Tuesday of a staph infection at his home. He was 96. Mr. Klaus was born in Baltimore and spent the remainder of his life in Woodlawn. "He lived in a house on Dogwood Road that was later torn down in the 1960s to make way for Martin's West," said his daughter, Cassie A. Klaus-Maye of Williamsburg, Va. Mr. Klaus attended Woodlawn Elementary School until the fifth grade, when he left to help support his family.
NEWS
By Delia M. Rios and Delia M. Rios,NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | July 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - George Washington's distillery was no mere backyard hobby. In 1799, Washington showed a profit of $7,500 for 11,000 gallons of whiskey made from corn and rye - worth up to $500,000 on today's retail market and making his one of the largest distillery operations in 18th-century America. And just six weeks before he died, he wrote to a nephew that "demand for this article is brisk." The letter, sent from Mount Vernon, went back to Washington's Virginia home recently, on permanent loan from the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, which represents most of the country's producers and marketers of distilled spirits.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 20, 1994
Drivers roaring up and down the Jones Falls Expressway often find themselves smelling pickles or sniffing fresh potato salad.Most people just think it's their imagination or blame it on the pungent odors that envelop Baltimore on sultry nights or humid days.A few people identify a group of old industrial buildings at Cold Spring Lane as "the pickle works." This identification is nearly correct. But you won't find any cucumbers here.Those who call it the vinegar works get the A-plus.A few more might even recognize the fieldstone and frame buildings alongside the Central Light Rail Line and not far from the expressway as the Melvale Distillery, once the largest liquor distillery in the state.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2010
Charles Wilbur "Stretch" Crisp, a retired distillery supervisor and collector of vintage Jaguars, was pronounced dead Saturday at Chester County Hospital in West Chester, Pa. The Woodlawn resident was 66. Mr. Crisp was attending a Cars of England at Oakbourne Mansion classic automobile meet in Westtown, Pa., when, while accepting an award for one of his Jaguars with his wife, he was stricken with the massive heart attack that took his life,...
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