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NEWS
October 20, 1997
LONG-DISTANCE LEARNING is all the rage on university campuses. The number of colleges offering "cyber" courses has doubled in just two years, to 1,128. Now the University System of Maryland wants to take the lead in this new technology through a global learning center at its Shady Grove campus in Montgomery County.It could give Maryland a clear advantage in the heated competition for jobs and economic growth over the next decade.The Maryland Global Learning Connection, the first in this country, would serve a variety of education functions:As a research and development arm in distance learning -- interactive video, teleconferencing, the Internet -- for all USM campuses.
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NEWS
March 14, 2014
I don't know if it was poor reporting by The Sun or poor accounting by Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance, but in an article about technology in schools you recently wrote that Mr. Dance would "pay for the computers in part by evaluating whether central office employees who leave the school system should be replaced" ( "Baltimore County school board OKs $205 million technology contract," March 11). I'm not a bookkeeper, but I can't recall when the act of evaluating ever helped pay for anything.
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NEWS
By GEORGE HAHN II | March 31, 1991
The recently-announced University of Maryland plan for "distance learning" may make for good instruction. But make no mistake. It will not be good education.A branch of an Orwellian system called "Mind Extension U," the program, with admirable intention, would bring courses into the comfort of the home via cable television and video to reach students -- salesmen, housewives and other busy people -- who cannot take time to travel to the campus. A high-tech democratic version of a chicken in every pot, the system would put a professor in every parlor and ultimately a B.A. on many resumes.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
Two weeks after Beverly Poyer married her husband in 2007, he was deployed to Afghanistan. When he came home a year later, she was thrust into a role she hadn't expected: caregiver. Army Spc. Max Poyer, exposed to frequent mortar blasts in Afghanistan, suffered brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. Now the life the Southern Maryland couple had planned - to finish college, buy a house and have more children - had to be redefined. That's when Beverly Poyer, 32, found a new calling: helping military families overcome emotional battle scars and transition back to civilian life.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1998
For Dr. Henry Eisenberg, a surgeon at Cleveland's Hillcrest Hospital, a 10-week course on managed care at Johns Hopkins University seemed almost a necessity."
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Thomas W. Waldron and John W. Frece and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writers | August 8, 1993
Maryland telephone customers will foot some of the bill for a new statewide telecommunications network that the president of the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. had promised would have "absolutely no impact on basic ratepayers."C&P officials acknowledged last week that a favorable ruling by Maryland utility regulators in late March will allow the company to finance installation of a fiber-optic network, at least in part, with money that otherwise would have been refunded to telephone customers from excess profits.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
Three distance learning classes in history at Carroll Community College will give area students the opportunity to learn from professors at colleges outside county lines. Two of the classes, which will be offered this fall, are the product of an interactive video exchange with Howard Community College. They enable students at the Howard and Carroll schools to interact with each other and the instructor. "Basically I'm teaching in two locations at the same time," said Vladimir G. Marinich, a Howard Community College professor of social sciences who will teach "History of Modern Russia" on interactive video this fall.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2000
Three afternoons a week at Atholton High School in Columbia, six students sit in a room and watch television. For this they receive four college credits. It might seem strange, but it isn't when one considers that on the other side of the TV camera is a math professor at Howard Community College, teaching the fundamentals of statistics -- a college-level course usually reserved for undergraduate freshmen and sophomores. This is not a public access channel broadcast of a class that the Atholton students just observe.
NEWS
July 30, 1994
Once again, the Schaefer administration has created a contract controversy in which the state's cable companies charge they have been effectively excluded from bidding on a project to create an interactive telecommunications network linking the state's schools and colleges.These same charges were made last year, when Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced a statewide "distance-learning" network -- without seeking competitive bids. Only when the attorney general raised concerns did the governor back off.Recently, the state set out bid specifications for the project that cable companies say are beyond their capabilities.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
Bell Atlantic Corp. is among the 100 companies strutting its technological stuff this week at EDUCOM '92, the annual meeting on information technology in higher education being held at the Baltimore Convention Center this week.Bell Atlantic, the parent of Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., pushed "distance learning" in its booth. Distance learning is the idea of bringing together students in different locations for instruction by a teacher in yet another location. Although separated by geography, teacher and students are able to maintain communication.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
Calvert School, the private, pre-kindergarten through eighth grade day school in North Baltimore, announced Wednesday that it has sold its more than 100-year-old distance learning business to a private equity firm. The terms of the sale of Calvert Education Services to an investment group led by the Baltimore-based Camden Partners Holdings LLC were not disclosed. "It has a wonderful reputation as a real leader in both home schooling and online education," said David Warnock, Camden Partners' chairman.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | August 12, 2010
If you type "college costs bubble" into an Internet search engine as I did recently, you'll find quite the list of news stories and opinion pieces focused on the fact that the costs of higher education have risen so quickly and reached such heights that they are obviously unsustainable. "Unsustainability" is a word we see more and more as the economy continues its weakness. Public worker pension costs are described that way, having been sustained thus far only by tapping the federal Treasury to bail out the many states that can't meet their pension liabilities.
BUSINESS
By Trif Alatzas and Trif Alatzas,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | December 22, 2002
Real estate agents and brokers in Maryland could start taking required education courses over the Internet or by mail next year in a move aimed at making licensing requirements for the industry more convenient. The Maryland Real Estate Commission approved plans last week to allow certain continuing education courses to count as credit outside the traditional classroom. Called distance learning, the program is similar to Internet, teleconferencing and other educational courses offered by colleges and other schools that allow individuals to study and take examinations in their homes or offices.
NEWS
August 13, 2001
IN THE NEXT 10 years, Maryland's four-year colleges will see a sharp rise in part-time students, while community colleges confront a boom in full-time students. Meanwhile, enrollments for online "distance learning" courses will soar. Those changes will require a dramatic shift in focus. Maryland's education infrastructure can't handle all the students graduating from high school between now and 2010 - 61,000 more than forecast a year ago. Four-year institutions will see an increase in part-timers of 69 percent over 10 years.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
Three distance learning classes in history at Carroll Community College will give area students the opportunity to learn from professors at colleges outside county lines. Two of the classes, which will be offered this fall, are the product of an interactive video exchange with Howard Community College. They enable students at the Howard and Carroll schools to interact with each other and the instructor. "Basically I'm teaching in two locations at the same time," said Vladimir G. Marinich, a Howard Community College professor of social sciences who will teach "History of Modern Russia" on interactive video this fall.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
Three distance learning classes in history at Carroll Community College will give area students the opportunity to learn from professors at colleges outside county lines. Two of the classes, which will be offered this fall, are the product of an interactive video exchange with Howard Community College. They enable students at the Howard and Carroll schools to interact with each other and the instructor. "Basically I'm teaching in two locations at the same time," said Vladimir G. Marinich, a Howard Community College professor of social sciences who will teach "History of Modern Russia" on interactive video this fall.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
Three distance learning classes in history at Carroll Community College will give area students the opportunity to learn from professors at colleges outside county lines. Two of the classes, which will be offered this fall, are the product of an interactive video exchange with Howard Community College. They enable students at the Howard and Carroll schools to interact with each other and the instructor. "Basically I'm teaching in two locations at the same time," said Vladimir G. Marinich, a Howard Community College professor of social sciences who will teach "History of Modern Russia" on interactive video this fall.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1997
Take class in bed.An appealing prospect to that slothlike subset of Gen-Xers: The Laziest College Students in the Nation. A subset of which I consider myself an honored member.And taking classes in bed is exactly what the ad for Howard Community College's distance learning courses promised.As a senior at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., I don't need the course to graduate or for any practical reason. But with all the hype about Internet and distance learning and the tantalizing premise, I decide to give it a whirl.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2001
Baltimore-based Sylvan Ventures LLC, a subsidiary of Sylvan Learning Systems Inc., said yesterday that it will invest $32.8 million in Walden University, a Minneapolis-based distance-learning college, in exchange for a 41 percent ownership stake in the school. Walden also announced yesterday that it is teaming up with another Sylvan Learning Systems subsidiary, Canter and Associates, to offer students a master's degree program in education, specializing in elementary reading and literacy.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
Four years after first offering courses completely through the Internet, Howard Community College is trying out a hybrid: classes run partly on the Web and partly on campus. It's an idea that's quietly gaining momentum among colleges in the state, as more and more instructors are seeing the Internet as a tool to enhance classes. Officials at HCC will offer five classes in the fall semester that are taught half on campus and half online, a format they call "CampusWeb."On the schedule are one class each in economics, composition and public speaking, and two in computers.
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