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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
ADELPHI -- Gerald A. Heeger says the future of the University of Maryland, University College (UMUC) is in the hands of people like Judy Rowe. At age 55, back in school after 35 years, she is the classic model of a nontraditional student who takes advantage of UMUC, the state's adult education institution. But she is also sold on online education. "I love it," she says of the method she has used to take about a half-dozen courses while on her way to a bachelor's degree in psychology. "And I was not computer-savvy when I started."
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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 12, 2004
In Baltimore County Goucher to hold forum tomorrow on presidential election TOWSON - Goucher College will offer a discussion on "Social, Religious and Gender Perspectives in the Presidential Campaign" at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Merrick Lecture Hall. A panel consisting of author and historian Taylor Branch, journalist Eleanor Clift and the Rev. Frances Draper will participate in the discussion. Branch is considered to be an authority on the civil rights movement. Clift is a former White House correspondent for Newsweek.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
Odessa Dubose plans to earn a degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health without spending much time in Baltimore. She'll do most of the work from her computer in Miami.Peter Edwards plans to earn his in Milwaukee.Neither will have quit jobs, left families or lugged belongings across the country. But with any luck, they will learn biostatistics and epidemiology as if they had.Like just about everything else in American life, the correspondence course has entered the computer age.Last week, 37 students from around the nation arrived in Baltimore for the launching of Hopkins' "distance education" program -- a 15-month course that will be taught largely over the Internet.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
Gregg Ramsay is a busy man. He's director of online education at Capitol College in Laurel, where he teaches computer programming and software engineering. He teaches ethics and labor history at Pace University in New York. There's the other work of a professor: attending faculty meetings, advising students. But in one important respect, Ramsay is different from most professors: He does all of his work from a western New Hampshire mountainside. "I'm six steps from work, and my seven cats are my only traffic jam," Ramsay says.
NEWS
By Allen N. Smith | November 16, 1995
Telephone conversation soon to take place between a teacher and one of thousands of students who will be enrolled in the new University of Maryland Distance Education courses:SALISBURY -- Hello, is this my teacher?I don't know, son. What course are you taking?On my computer they call it Biology 101 DE.Young man, you must be enrolled in my new Distance Education course beamed throughout Maryland from our flagship campus in College Park. Where are you calling from?I'm in my dorm room at Salisbury State University on the Eastern Shore, and I just can't understand what chromosomes are. Can you help me?
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2000
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County will offer an online master's degree through United States Open University, the first American school to become a partner with what is potentially one of the biggest players in the distance education field. "They are really world class," Scott Bass, dean of UMBC's graduate school, said of the Open University, a 30-year-old British institution that opened its American arm a year ago. The master's will be in information systems, a computer-oriented course that will enroll its first 100 students next semester.
NEWS
November 25, 2001
School board to meet Wednesday to discuss promotion, retention The Board of Education of Carroll County will hold a meeting for business matters at 1 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices in Westminster. A work session on the promotion and retention policy will be held at 2 p.m. The public is welcome. Offices are at 125 N. Court St. Information: 410-751-3020. Carroll schools offer GED tests monthly The Carroll County public schools offer General Educational Development tests and practice sessions for those 16 and older who wish to earn their high school diploma.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 12, 2004
In Baltimore County Goucher to hold forum tomorrow on presidential election TOWSON - Goucher College will offer a discussion on "Social, Religious and Gender Perspectives in the Presidential Campaign" at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Merrick Lecture Hall. A panel consisting of author and historian Taylor Branch, journalist Eleanor Clift and the Rev. Frances Draper will participate in the discussion. Branch is considered to be an authority on the civil rights movement. Clift is a former White House correspondent for Newsweek.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
University of Maryland, University College's ballyhooed move into the dot-com business has been put on hold, but school officials blame the delay on federal regulations, not on the virtual collapse of the online economy. It was 18 months ago that the state's 50-year-old continuing education school announced plans for a for-profit company that would market its fast-growing Internet courses. UMUC President Gerald Heeger said he had encouraging talks with venture capitalists about funding the company, but U.S. Department of Education (DOE)
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
Gregg Ramsay is a busy man. He's director of online education at Capitol College in Laurel, where he teaches computer programming and software engineering. He teaches ethics and labor history at Pace University in New York. There's the other work of a professor: attending faculty meetings, advising students. But in one important respect, Ramsay is different from most professors: He does all of his work from a western New Hampshire mountainside. "I'm six steps from work, and my seven cats are my only traffic jam," Ramsay says.
NEWS
November 25, 2001
School board to meet Wednesday to discuss promotion, retention The Board of Education of Carroll County will hold a meeting for business matters at 1 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices in Westminster. A work session on the promotion and retention policy will be held at 2 p.m. The public is welcome. Offices are at 125 N. Court St. Information: 410-751-3020. Carroll schools offer GED tests monthly The Carroll County public schools offer General Educational Development tests and practice sessions for those 16 and older who wish to earn their high school diploma.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
University of Maryland, University College's ballyhooed move into the dot-com business has been put on hold, but school officials blame the delay on federal regulations, not on the virtual collapse of the online economy. It was 18 months ago that the state's 50-year-old continuing education school announced plans for a for-profit company that would market its fast-growing Internet courses. UMUC President Gerald Heeger said he had encouraging talks with venture capitalists about funding the company, but U.S. Department of Education (DOE)
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2000
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County will offer an online master's degree through United States Open University, the first American school to become a partner with what is potentially one of the biggest players in the distance education field. "They are really world class," Scott Bass, dean of UMBC's graduate school, said of the Open University, a 30-year-old British institution that opened its American arm a year ago. The master's will be in information systems, a computer-oriented course that will enroll its first 100 students next semester.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
ADELPHI -- Gerald A. Heeger says the future of the University of Maryland, University College (UMUC) is in the hands of people like Judy Rowe. At age 55, back in school after 35 years, she is the classic model of a nontraditional student who takes advantage of UMUC, the state's adult education institution. But she is also sold on online education. "I love it," she says of the method she has used to take about a half-dozen courses while on her way to a bachelor's degree in psychology. "And I was not computer-savvy when I started."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
Odessa Dubose plans to earn a degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health without spending much time in Baltimore. She'll do most of the work from her computer in Miami.Peter Edwards plans to earn his in Milwaukee.Neither will have quit jobs, left families or lugged belongings across the country. But with any luck, they will learn biostatistics and epidemiology as if they had.Like just about everything else in American life, the correspondence course has entered the computer age.Last week, 37 students from around the nation arrived in Baltimore for the launching of Hopkins' "distance education" program -- a 15-month course that will be taught largely over the Internet.
NEWS
By Allen N. Smith | November 16, 1995
Telephone conversation soon to take place between a teacher and one of thousands of students who will be enrolled in the new University of Maryland Distance Education courses:SALISBURY -- Hello, is this my teacher?I don't know, son. What course are you taking?On my computer they call it Biology 101 DE.Young man, you must be enrolled in my new Distance Education course beamed throughout Maryland from our flagship campus in College Park. Where are you calling from?I'm in my dorm room at Salisbury State University on the Eastern Shore, and I just can't understand what chromosomes are. Can you help me?
NEWS
January 10, 2002
The University of Maryland University College is closing its campus in Germany, saying it has failed to live up to expectations and is a financial drain at a time of state budget constraints. University College, the system's distance education branch, created the campus in southwestern Germany in 1992 - forming the college's only overseas branch, other than classes at U.S. military posts. The campus was expected to have an enrollment of 800, but has only 260 students, with a full-time faculty of 15. Its $5 million budget is running a $300,000 deficit.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Founding MythEditor: At a time when the majority of Americans were in favor of the war against Iraq, Ray Jenkins chose to publish someunpopular opinions concerning our nation's history and belief in its own moral superiority. After an extremely negative and totally predictable reaction, he again had the courage to express his opinions in print. I congratulate him.Concerning the overwhelming reaction to his opinions, allow me to quote from Marie-France Toinet, author of ''Does Anti-Americanism Exist'':''.
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