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By Steven Mufson and The Washington Post | December 26, 2009
China's leading dissident, Liu Xiaobo, was sentenced Friday to 11 years in prison after a court found the 53-year-old literary scholar guilty of "inciting subversion to state power" through his writings and role in Charter 08, a petition advocating human rights, free speech and an end to one-party rule. The verdict sent a signal that China's Communist Party will continue to stifle domestic political critics, especially those who seek to organize their fellow Chinese. And it provided evidence that political modernization might not go hand in hand with China's economic modernization.
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NEWS
By Thomas Cantwell | October 28, 2013
In 2003, I served as a senior military officer at Camp Ashraf, Iraq. In keeping with my responsibility as an oath-bound Army officer and under the Geneva Convention, I made a solemn promise to the group of 3,000 Iranian dissidents living there. I assumed U.S. Army responsibility for the security of these people, who were living in fear of being hunted by the Iranian regime and its allied Shiia death squads in Iraq. Initially considered "terrorists," the dissidents were detained, disarmed, confined, subjected to military intelligence and FBI screening and ultimately guaranteed protected persons status under the Geneva Convention.
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NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | November 16, 1992
CONTRARY TO POPULAR OPINION. By Alan M. Dershowitz. Pharos Books. 398 pages. $22.95.ONCE upon a time there was a young Harvard professor who decided that instead of getting all his legal knowledge from law ++ books, he also would get involved in actual court cases. From such unusual beginnings did Alan Dershowitz move on to become one of the most famous lawyers in America -- becoming in the process an author, talk show guest and even a major character in a motion picture.He also, somehow, finds time to write a syndicated newspaper )
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
  A Montgomery County woman who has split with other Second Amendment activists on how to fight Gov. Martin O'Malley 's recently passed gun safety bill said Friday that she has received the green light to begin a petition drive to bring the issue to a referendum. Sue Payne said has received approval from the State Board of Elections for the form and summary wording of the petitions she intends to circulate as she seeks signatures to put the gun bill, which O'Malley is expect to sign later this month, on the 2014 ballot.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 13, 2004
BOSTON - Ever wonder what happened to the State Department's chief of propaganda? The head of public diplomacy was supposed to win the hearts and minds of the Muslim street. After all that fanfare, the PR seat has been empty lo these many months. Is it possible that no one wants to be chief flack for the gang that couldn't shoot straight? Let's take the bungled case of Shirin Ebadi, the first Muslim woman to ever win the Nobel Peace Prize. This Iranian dissident is being prevented from publishing her memoirs in the United States because of regulations that prohibit "trading with the enemy."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 10, 2006
BEIJING -- In a development expected to put more pressure on foreign high-tech companies operating in China, a free-speech group yesterday accused Yahoo of providing information to the Chinese government that helped it arrest and imprison a cyber-dissident in 2003. The report by Paris-based Reporters Without Borders said Chinese court documents show that Yahoo helped authorities identify Li Zhi through his e-mail address and user name. The former civil servant from Dazhou in southwestern China was sentenced in December 2003 for "inciting subversion" after posting essays detailing local corruption.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 7, 1991
BEIJING -- Ill with hepatitis, denied proper medical treatment and confined to a tiny, squalid cell, a leading imprisoned Chinese dissident is threatening to launch a hunger strike next week unless authorities accede to his repeated requests to be hospitalized, the dissident's wife said last night.Wang Juntao, 33, sentenced in February to 13 years in jail for allegedly being one of "the black hands" behind the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, contracted the liver ailment while imprisoned in January before his trial, and his condition has steadily worsened, his wife, Hou Xiaotian, said in an interview.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2004
Victor Blok, a physicist and Soviet dissident who immigrated to the United States and settled in Baltimore in 1987, died Wednesday of a brain hemorrhage at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 58, and had been in a coma since 1998, suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Dr. Blok was born in Moldova. His father was a colonel in the Russian military, an engineer who built bridges during World War II. Victor Blok grew up in Volgograd, then called Stalingrad. He was a brilliant student, and studied at the prestigious Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.
NEWS
By Susan Hansen and Susan Hansen,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Dissident members of a leading maritime industry union have scored a major electoral upset, seizing key leadership posts in a victory they said will help restore union democracy and protect a $1 billion Baltimore-based pension fund.Dissident candidates ousted more than a dozen top officials of the District 1 Marine Engineers Beneficial Association/National Maritime Union."People wanted a change," said Gordon Ward, a Timonium resident who will take over as chairman of the union's licensed division, which represents about 4,800 marine engineers and ships' officers nationwide.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | September 16, 1993
BEIJING -- Wei Jingsheng is free from jail but not from police custody -- underscoring the limited meaning of freedom in China.China's most renowned political dissident, Mr. Wei was paroled from prison Tuesday morning, six months before the end of his 15-year jail term. But by late last night, he still had not shown up at his parents' apartment.Even relatives have not been able to see him or talk with him by phone, his sister, Wei Ling, said yesterday.She said police told her that they are keeping him at an undisclosed location for "these few days" to prevent him from talking to the horde of foreign reporters who have camped in a courtyard near his parents' apartment for two days.
NEWS
May 3, 2012
American embassy officials in Beijing didn't exactly throw out the welcome mat when one of China's leading human rights activists showed up on their doorstep last week seeking refuge. But having allowed him inside and sheltered him for several days while they negotiated his fate with Chinese authorities, the U.S. made itself responsible for his safety, and it must honor that commitment even though he is no longer under the embassy's protection. Chen Guangcheng, a blind, self-taught lawyer and fierce critic of China's forced-abortion policy, told officials he had traveled 400 miles to Beijing after escaping de facto house arrest in a provincial town.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
Abbey Victor Kovens, a Baltimore travel agent who during the 1970s circled the world in record time, earning him a mention in the Guinness Book of World Records, died Wednesday of complications from heart disease at his Owings Mills home. He was 67. The son of a vending machine manufacturing executive and a homemaker, he was a cousin of the late Baltimore political kingmaker Irv Kovens. Mr. Kovens, who never used his first name, was born in Baltimore and raised near Mondawmin and later in the Strathmore Park neighborhood in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Steven Mufson and The Washington Post | December 26, 2009
China's leading dissident, Liu Xiaobo, was sentenced Friday to 11 years in prison after a court found the 53-year-old literary scholar guilty of "inciting subversion to state power" through his writings and role in Charter 08, a petition advocating human rights, free speech and an end to one-party rule. The verdict sent a signal that China's Communist Party will continue to stifle domestic political critics, especially those who seek to organize their fellow Chinese. And it provided evidence that political modernization might not go hand in hand with China's economic modernization.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 3, 2009
As cold cases go, this one's a doozy. The world's first Methodist college, one of Maryland's earliest institutions of higher education, burned in 1795. Newspapers at the time said it was arson. The governor offered a $1,000 reward - a lot of money then - to catch the perpetrator. But no one was ever charged. Enter Bonnie McCubbin, an anthropology and history major at St. Mary's College of Maryland, who graduated in May. More than two centuries after the mysterious fire, the 22-year-old from Bel Air tracked down artifacts excavated decades ago at the site in Harford County where Cokesbury College once stood.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | July 22, 2008
Yahoo Inc. and Carl C. Icahn announced yesterday that they had settled their dispute over the makeup of the company's board, striking a compromise that will give the dissident investor and his allies three of the board's 11 seats. The move ends a showdown that had been set for Yahoo's annual meeting Aug. 1, when shareholders would have voted on a rival slate of board members proposed by Icahn. He had vowed to pursue a sale of Yahoo to Microsoft Corp. Under the agreement, Yahoo co-founder Jerry Yang will remain chief executive and Roy Bostock will remain board chairman.
NEWS
August 24, 2007
Ralph Marsh, 70 Author and journalist Ralph Marsh, an author and veteran journalist for the Associated Press and various newspapers, has died. He was 70. Mr. Marsh died Wednesday at his home near Heavener, Okla., after a short illness, according to Evans and Miller Funeral Home in Poteau, Okla. He worked for more than three decades as a reporter and editor at newspapers in Kansas and Oklahoma, including the Wichita, Kan., Eagle-Beacon, The Oklahoman, the Tulsa Tribune, the Chickasha Daily Express and the Topeka Capital-Journal, as well as at the AP. Mr. Marsh was Capitol correspondent for the now-defunct Tribune and covered the Capitol for the AP in the 1970s.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 21, 2002
BEIJING - China announced yesterday that it had recently arrested a prominent U.S.-based dissident, whom colleagues had reported missing in June while he was on a trip to Vietnam. Wang Bingzhang, a permanent U.S. resident who lives in New York, was arrested on charges of espionage and "violent terrorist activities," said Xinhua, the Chinese government news agency, quoting a spokesman from the Ministry of Public Security. The announcement gave few details of Wang's alleged activities, other than to accuse him of passing state secrets to Taiwan and posting essays on the Internet related to terrorist acts that threatened state security.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 1, 1994
MOSCOW -- Supporters of two Central Asian journalists who have been arrested here launched a campaign yesterday to try to block their extradition to Turkmenistan.The two men are critics of the Turkmen president, Saparmurat Niyazov, who has smashed his opposition at home, spread his portrait everywhere (even on coins and bills), and renamed himself "Turkmenbashi," or Father of All Turkmen.Like many dissidents fleeing oppression in the former Soviet republics of Central Asia, the two journalists, Murad Esenov and Khalmurad Soyunov, had come to Moscow to continue their work.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 24, 2007
Iran is in the throes of one of its most ferocious crackdowns on dissent in years, with the government focusing on labor leaders, universities, the press, women's rights advocates, a former nuclear negotiator and Iranian-Americans, three of whom have been in prison for more than six weeks. The shift is occurring against the backdrop of an economy so stressed that although Iran is the world's second-largest oil exporter, it is on the verge of rationing gasoline. At the same time, the nuclear standoff with the West threatens to bring new sanctions.
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