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Dissertation

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By Los Angeles Times | October 11, 1991
A panel of scholars at Boston University has decided that the doctorate earned there by the late Martin Luther King Jr. in 1956 should not be revoked even though his dissertation contains plagiarisms that were disclosed last year, shocking admirers of the slain civil rights leader.Instead, the Boston University committee, in a report released yesterday, recommended that a disciplinary letter noting the scholarly improprieties be attached to the official copy of King's theology dissertation in the school's library.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Having achieved a degree of notoriety as an editor, I find myself in the uncomfortable role of mentor. A while back, I spent a year as a mentor to a younger newspaper editor in a program set up by the Maynard Institute, and there were a number of young editors whom I hired, when newspapers still hired people, whose careers I was able to foster. Now I find myself about to advise a would-be editor in a different program. It's a little awkward because of the circuitous route by which I found my own path.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1995
Karen Ann Stout successfully defended her doctoral dissertation yesterday at the University of Delaware.Earning a Ph.D. is hard enough, but Ms. Stout of Bel Air paid a high price for hers -- perhaps more than two Harford men who a year ago stole her laptop computer -- and two disks full of information gathered for her dissertation.One of the two thieves got a one-year suspended sentence last fall. The other got six months in jail when he was sentenced Wednesday. Both had been convicted in Harford Circuit Court.
NEWS
May 15, 2002
SOMETIMES, the more you try to keep something quiet, the louder it gets. That's a lesson learned the hard way by administrators at the Bryn Mawr School in the wake of news stories detailing the school's refusal to allow a historian's dissertation to be published. It all started when Andrea Hamilton, a graduate student at Tulane University, decided to write her dissertation on the history of the well-respected private girls' school in north Baltimore and got permission to mine Bryn Mawr's archives for material.
NEWS
May 15, 2002
SOMETIMES, the more you try to keep something quiet, the louder it gets. That's a lesson learned the hard way by administrators at the Bryn Mawr School in the wake of news stories detailing the school's refusal to allow a historian's dissertation to be published. It all started when Andrea Hamilton, a graduate student at Tulane University, decided to write her dissertation on the history of the well-respected private girls' school in north Baltimore and got permission to mine Bryn Mawr's archives for material.
NEWS
By Mark J. Drozdowski | March 3, 2002
RINDGE, N.H. - Spring semester is well underway, and college seniors across the country will soon face the prospect of beginning a career. With the job market in turmoil these days, many students are contemplating graduate school. Some might even think about the ultimate scholarly Holy Grail - the doctorate. As a recent grad school survivor, I can honestly address the key question: Is it worth it? I began graduate school when the word "millennium" referred to some science fiction show on cable.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Having achieved a degree of notoriety as an editor, I find myself in the uncomfortable role of mentor. A while back, I spent a year as a mentor to a younger newspaper editor in a program set up by the Maynard Institute, and there were a number of young editors whom I hired, when newspapers still hired people, whose careers I was able to foster. Now I find myself about to advise a would-be editor in a different program. It's a little awkward because of the circuitous route by which I found my own path.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sally McGrane and Sally McGrane,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 2002
Two years ago, Wayne Westerman, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Delaware, had a problem. His dissertation was almost due, and he couldn't type more than a page a day because of repetitive-stress problems that had begun when he was an undergraduate. "I couldn't stand to press the buttons anymore," he said. For Westerman (who ultimately did receive his doctorate), work also provided a solution. His dissertation in the university's electrical and computer engineering department involved the development of a keyless keyboard, one that did not require the same degree of finger pressure.
NEWS
April 4, 1999
Wilson Riles, 81, a charismatic and imposing educator who in 1970 became the first black elected to statewide office in California when he began a 12-year tenure as state superintendent of public instruction, died Thursday after a recent series of strokes and heart attacks.He gained national prominence after his stunning defeat of Max Rafferty, a white, right-wing ideologue who had spent much of his eight years in office preaching a return to basics and denouncing progressive approaches to schooling.
NEWS
By Steve Courtney and Steve Courtney,Hartford Courant | March 17, 1991
LAST CHANCE TO SEE.Douglas Adamsand Mark Carwardine.Harmony Books.220 pages. $20.Pairing British humorist Douglas Adams -- best known for thmind-bogglingly funny science fiction of "The Hitchhiker's Guide the Galaxy" and its many novelistic offspring -- with the serious issue of dying species may seem an odd idea.It turns out that, like the "Hitchhiker's Guide," this was the British Broadcasting Co.'s odd idea, although the BBC got the idea from a magazine article that paired Mr. Adams with zoologist Mark Carwardine of the World Wildlife Fund.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
In the waning months of 1998, Andrea Hamilton was on top of the world. She had earned a doctorate in history at Tulane University after toiling for three years on a scholarly paper about Baltimore's Bryn Mawr School and its place in women's education. She had sold the dissertation, a social history of the nation's first school dedicated exclusively to college preparation for girls, to the prestigious Johns Hopkins University Press. With her paper due for publication as a book, Hamilton would move from student to scholar, and her future as a historian looked rosy.
NEWS
By Mark J. Drozdowski | March 3, 2002
RINDGE, N.H. - Spring semester is well underway, and college seniors across the country will soon face the prospect of beginning a career. With the job market in turmoil these days, many students are contemplating graduate school. Some might even think about the ultimate scholarly Holy Grail - the doctorate. As a recent grad school survivor, I can honestly address the key question: Is it worth it? I began graduate school when the word "millennium" referred to some science fiction show on cable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sally McGrane and Sally McGrane,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 2002
Two years ago, Wayne Westerman, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Delaware, had a problem. His dissertation was almost due, and he couldn't type more than a page a day because of repetitive-stress problems that had begun when he was an undergraduate. "I couldn't stand to press the buttons anymore," he said. For Westerman (who ultimately did receive his doctorate), work also provided a solution. His dissertation in the university's electrical and computer engineering department involved the development of a keyless keyboard, one that did not require the same degree of finger pressure.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - For Jeremy Korr, the question is fast becoming what won't people do on the Capital Beltway. The 28-year-old graduate student at the University of Maryland has discovered that they'll put on makeup, fly kites, send e-mail, read novels, play poker, revive a romance and even shave while driving along one of the nation's busiest and most traffic-choked highways. One thing is certain: The old "hands at 10 and 2" steering-wheel position appears to be a relic found only in driver's education textbooks.
NEWS
April 4, 1999
Wilson Riles, 81, a charismatic and imposing educator who in 1970 became the first black elected to statewide office in California when he began a 12-year tenure as state superintendent of public instruction, died Thursday after a recent series of strokes and heart attacks.He gained national prominence after his stunning defeat of Max Rafferty, a white, right-wing ideologue who had spent much of his eight years in office preaching a return to basics and denouncing progressive approaches to schooling.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 30, 1998
Faith Ford plays a small-town girl who returns to her roots after the bust-up of her big-city marriage in the new CBS sitcom "Maggie Winters."Ford is a nice supporting player, as anyone knows who watched her Corky Sherwood character over the years on "Murphy Brown." But this leading role may be too much for her to handle. Ford's two or three Corky moves start wearing thin by the first commercial break.But just because she's not much of a leading actress and the sitcom is not all that entertaining, it doesn't mean "Maggie Winters" is dead meat.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - For Jeremy Korr, the question is fast becoming what won't people do on the Capital Beltway. The 28-year-old graduate student at the University of Maryland has discovered that they'll put on makeup, fly kites, send e-mail, read novels, play poker, revive a romance and even shave while driving along one of the nation's busiest and most traffic-choked highways. One thing is certain: The old "hands at 10 and 2" steering-wheel position appears to be a relic found only in driver's education textbooks.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 30, 1998
Faith Ford plays a small-town girl who returns to her roots after the bust-up of her big-city marriage in the new CBS sitcom "Maggie Winters."Ford is a nice supporting player, as anyone knows who watched her Corky Sherwood character over the years on "Murphy Brown." But this leading role may be too much for her to handle. Ford's two or three Corky moves start wearing thin by the first commercial break.But just because she's not much of a leading actress and the sitcom is not all that entertaining, it doesn't mean "Maggie Winters" is dead meat.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1995
Karen Ann Stout successfully defended her doctoral dissertation yesterday at the University of Delaware.Earning a Ph.D. is hard enough, but Ms. Stout of Bel Air paid a high price for hers -- perhaps more than two Harford men who a year ago stole her laptop computer -- and two disks full of information gathered for her dissertation.One of the two thieves got a one-year suspended sentence last fall. The other got six months in jail when he was sentenced Wednesday. Both had been convicted in Harford Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 11, 1991
A panel of scholars at Boston University has decided that the doctorate earned there by the late Martin Luther King Jr. in 1956 should not be revoked even though his dissertation contains plagiarisms that were disclosed last year, shocking admirers of the slain civil rights leader.Instead, the Boston University committee, in a report released yesterday, recommended that a disciplinary letter noting the scholarly improprieties be attached to the official copy of King's theology dissertation in the school's library.
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