Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDissent
IN THE NEWS

Dissent

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 30, 2013
The private ownership of property is embedded throughout the Constitution and is a foundational aspect of the American experience ("High court bolsters property owners' rights" June 26). Justice Elena Kagan's strongly worded dissent that state and local government land-use decisions would be subjected to heightened constitutional scrutiny reflects her apparently limited understanding - or more likely - socialist-leaning personal philosophy regarding the Constitution and the reasons the country was founded, one of which was individual property rights.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 1, 2014
It was sad to read that a court has approved the National Security Agency's spying on American citizens ("Judge upholds NSA phone scrutiny," Dec. 28). The agency is gathering "intelligence" on me when I make phone calls and collects the dates and phone numbers called. This is an illegal search and seizure, yet a federal judge in New York ruled that it is constitutional. The only reason would seem to be that he was protecting the NSA. What have I done that permits the NSA to seize my private data?
Advertisement
NEWS
November 19, 2013
"Dissent is the highest form of patriotism. " During George W. Bush's term that sentiment was often seen, usually with a statement of support for Democratic Party candidates. Now that President Barack Obama is in office, those who dissent are vilified and bullied by representatives of the party who espoused dissent a few years before. When opposition to the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) was voiced, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid called the dissenters "anarchists," and Sen. Barbara Boxer likened them to those who commit domestic abuse.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
COLLEGE PARK  - A year ago, coaches representing the University of Maryland's 19 athletic teams lined up across the back wall of a meeting room in the student union, all dressed in red. The plan, according to an internal email, was to present a "visual display of unity" behind university President Wallace Loh as he publicly announced the school's move to the Big Ten Conference after 60 years in the Atlantic Coast Conference. But the reality is that two of the school's most prominent coaches had reacted strongly against the decision in private, while others were stunned, according to interviews and emails obtained by The Baltimore Sun under a Public Information Act request.
NEWS
March 6, 1992
Keith Hudson got into an argument with another prisoner at Louisiana State Prison. Two correctional officers handcuffed and shackled him, removed him, unresisting, from his cell and beat and kicked him. By any definition of the word, that was "punishment." By any informed contemporary definition of the word, it was "cruel." Therefore, it seems clear to us, as it did to seven members of the most conservative Supreme Court in nearly 60 years, it was a violation of the Bill of Rights' ban on "cruel and unusual punishment."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | August 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Highlighting a level of internal foreign-policy dissent rarely seen since the Vietnam era, a fourth State Department official resigned yesterday to protest the lack of U.S. action to protect Bosnia.Stephen W. Walker, 30, Croatian desk officer in the department's Balkan Conflict Group, said in his resignation letter to Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher that U.S. policies are "misguided, vacillating and dangerous," threatening not only the Balkan region and its thousands of victims but also "vital U.S. interests."
NEWS
By Charles Levendosky | June 2, 1996
"GET A LIFE, judge." That was the reaction provoked by reading Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's petulant dissent in Romer vs. Evans, which struck down Colorado's anti-gay amendment.He doesn't bother to disguise his loathing for homosexuals. He criticizes them for having "high disposable income," "possessing political power much greater than their numbers" and enjoying "enormous influence in American media and politics."Could call it envy -- except U.S. Supreme Court justices enjoy more of the same.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2002
May a jurist rule in verse, if he's dignified and terse? Or are some texts meant to be wholly free of poetry? A dissent last month by a justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, in seven quatrains and one footnote, drew a sharp response from two colleagues. Chief Justice Stephen A. Zappala wrote that "an opinion that expresses itself in rhyme reflects poorly on the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania." Justice Ralph J. Cappy said "every jurist has the right to express him or herself in a manner the jurist deems appropriate," but expressed concern about "the perception that litigants and the public at large might form when an opinion of the court is reduced to rhyme."
NEWS
By LINDA GREENHOUSE and LINDA GREENHOUSE,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A Supreme Court decision yesterday in an uncelebrated criminal case did more than resolve a dispute over whether police are permitted to search a home without a warrant when one occupant gives consent but another objects. More than any other case, the 5-3 decision that said police do not have that power revealed the strains behind the surface placidity and collegiality of the court in its early months under Chief Justice John G. Roberts. It was not only that this case, out of 32 decided since the term began in October, provoked Roberts to write his first dissenting opinion.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2002
Second in an occasional series The afternoon sun breaks into a frosty glare across the picture window of Stefan Matheke-Fischer's high-rise apartment in Silver Spring. The 18-year-old is building a computer on a plain wooden table. He has stationed an electric guitar on the floor nearby and keeps a few good books around the room to feed his spirit. Over the last six months, Stefan has joined war protests in New York and Washington, survived his first stint in jail and become more intimately acquainted with surveillance tactics of the FBI. He seems surprisingly happy.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
"Dissent is the highest form of patriotism. " During George W. Bush's term that sentiment was often seen, usually with a statement of support for Democratic Party candidates. Now that President Barack Obama is in office, those who dissent are vilified and bullied by representatives of the party who espoused dissent a few years before. When opposition to the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) was voiced, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid called the dissenters "anarchists," and Sen. Barbara Boxer likened them to those who commit domestic abuse.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | September 27, 2013
There has been great controversy regarding the forcible removal of a Howard County parent from a Maryland State Department of Education town hall meeting a week ago after he insisted on orally asking a politically inconvenient question about the Common Core curriculum. Only written questions were allowed. Robert Small was roughly grabbed and physically removed from the meeting and humiliated and handcuffed, although charges of assaulting an officer were later dropped by Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger.
NEWS
June 30, 2013
The private ownership of property is embedded throughout the Constitution and is a foundational aspect of the American experience ("High court bolsters property owners' rights" June 26). Justice Elena Kagan's strongly worded dissent that state and local government land-use decisions would be subjected to heightened constitutional scrutiny reflects her apparently limited understanding - or more likely - socialist-leaning personal philosophy regarding the Constitution and the reasons the country was founded, one of which was individual property rights.
NEWS
November 6, 2012
While visiting friends in the Baltimore area, I saw Dan Rodricks ' column "A priest speaks up for same-sex marriage" (Nov. 4). As a Catholic priest myself, I am dismayed by Archbishop William E. Lori's assertion that "preaching ... requires subordination of personal views to the word of God" in response to the Rev. Richard T. Lawrence's nuanced distinctions. It was precisely Jesus' personal views that led him to freely and frequently dissent in interpreting Torah Law (word of God)
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
Someone pass the popcorn, there's a new legal drama unfolding at City Hall — Law & Order: Special Municipal Unit. You might have seen the news that Joan Pratt, comptroller, is suing Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, mayor, or at least, her technology office. Not to be outdone — because he never is when it comes to governmental hijinks — Baltimore City Circuit Court Clerk Frank Conaway has filed notice that he will sue the city over bad charges on water bills. And who knows, by the time you read this, maybe the trend will have spread to Annapolis, where Mayor Joshua Cohen recently busted a man allegedly relieving himself from the third floor of a parking garage.
NEWS
July 2, 2012
Regarding the recent protest outside the Basilica of the Assumption against Archbishop William Lori celebrating a mass initiating the "Fortnight for Freedom," I fail to understand why those who don't agree with church teachings remain in the church ("Catholic leaders launch campaign against Obama policies," June 21). It seems that it is a case of the tail wanting to wag the dog. They don't want to adhere to church doctrine; they want the church to change to meet their beliefs. It is reminiscent of King Henry VIII and Sir Thomas More.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and By Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 1, 2002
The hallmark of American politics, dissent is the keystone of U.S. democracy. Every movement for social change in the U.S. has been predicated on dissent; every evolution of our democracy, including the abolition of slavery, the emancipation of women and the incorporation of civil rights for the disenfranchised, has been heralded by dissent. Yet increasingly since Sept. 11, freedom of speech is under threat. Attorney General John Ashcroft has asserted that dissent is unpatriotic. President Bush has implied the same in his quest for support for a war against Iraq, demanding politicians and the nation "speak with one voice" -- his. But doesn't differentiated discourse make for a stronger democracy?
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1999
Robert E. Hunt, a former Roman Catholic priest who became known nationally in the 1960s for his public disagreement with Pope Paul VI's teaching on birth control, died Thursday at his Homeland residence of acute myeloid leukemia. He was 65.A North Baltimore resident since 1984, Mr. Hunt was born and raised in Newark, N.J. After graduating from Seton Hall University in 1954, he studied for the priesthood at the Vatican. He was ordained in 1957 and spent three years in Rome earning a doctoral degree in sacred theology.
NEWS
June 5, 2012
During the recent special session in Annapolis, it wasn't just Republicans that were fighting tax increases. Democrats, like myself, offered amendments to cut spending rather than raise taxes, and seven of us voted against the tax package. The General Assembly had the audacity to raise taxes, while ending the budget year with a $207 million dollar surplus. That's in addition to the $721 million that was set aside for the rainy day fund. The knee-jerk reaction to raise taxes rather than live within our means shows a blatant disrespect for the business community in this state.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | April 9, 2012
Adam Jones, the always-opinionated center fielder for the Orioles, gave a bizarrely cantankerous interview to a few reporters last week. What he said became a little kerfuffle on the eve of the Orioles opening their quest for their first .500 or better season since 1997. Let me be up front and say that I don't know anything about Adam Jones, other than what I've read in The Baltimore Sun. Generally cast as a jovial, playful guy, he's probably weary like anyone would be after answering years and years of reporters' questions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.