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Disruptive Students

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By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1996
Parents of Patuxent Middle School students told four Howard County school board candidates last night that they want officials to crack down on students with disciplinary problems.The 35 parents who attended a forum at the Jessup school heard the candidates' ideas on standardized tests, budgets, placing children with disabilities in regular classroom settings and a new technology program.Then the parents pressed the candidates for solutions to the problems presented by disruptive students.
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NEWS
June 3, 2008
Schools obliged to offer support I applaud Gregory Kane for his insistence that students enrolled in high schools with academic entrance requirements take responsibility for their academic and social success. Indeed, all students should attend school with such a sense of responsibility ("There's no room for hand-holding," May 28). I fear, however, that he missed the point of Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso's insistence that these schools demonstrate support for these students before dismissing them from their programs.
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NEWS
January 11, 1996
THE NUMBER OF students committing assaults, carrying weapons or otherwise disrupting the classroom has been growing steadily -- and not just in the inner city. The problem has escalated to the point that Gov. Parris Glendening is assembling a package of legislation to deal with the problem, ranging from alternative schools to ensuring that teachers and principals have support so they can carry out a policy of "zero tolerance" toward disruptive youths.In Anne Arundel County, for example, serious incidents have increased monthly since the start of this school year, with 267 assaults and 74 weapons offenses in the first three months alone.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,[Sun Reporter] | April 20, 2008
Crofton Elementary's lunch is a series of six tightly choreographed shifts that takes up nearly three hours, twice as long as at most elementary schools. Classroom space in the school is so limited that a special education class meets in what used to be a guidance counselor's office. Over capacity by 200 students, the school houses the overflow in 11 portables that hem the school building in from the sides and back. "It can be very frustrating," Principal Donna O'Shea said. A new redistricting plan approved by the school board last week seeks to solve Crofton's woes by moving 210 of the elementary school's students from the Walden community to the new Gambrills-area elementary school, which will open on Nantucket Drive this fall with a capacity of 713 students.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
The Northern High School principal who garnered national attention last fall when she suspended two-thirds of her 1,800 students now plans to put 50 youths out of her building for good.Alice Morgan Brown announced yesterday that 30 of the most disruptive students in her building will be reassigned to alternative programs in the Baltimore school system.About 20 others -- all older than 16 and not in special education -- will be removed from the rolls of the public schools and encouraged to seek GEDs or job training.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | April 24, 1992
Peter Commanday pulls no punches when he lectures to teachers aroundthe country."Don't be suckered into the verbal abuse," he said. "Never fall for that because you either end up in the hospital, on the floor or in the court."Commanday, a 27-year veteran of the New York City public schools,is conducting a series of workshops in the county for teachers and administrators on how to deal with disruptive students.At Annapolis High, several recent fights have broken out between students from two of the city's public housing communities, and other county schoolshave seen an increase in violence and weapons.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1996
Teachers, principals and other school officials asked for help from lawmakers yesterday to deal with the growing problem of disruptive students in the classroom."
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1998
Baltimore schools chief Robert Booker announced last night that the system will assume a "zero-tolerance" standard for disruptive student behavior.Booker hopes the new policy will help rein in Southern High School -- where violent and unruly students and nonstudents have made the school year chaotic -- and prevent other schools from losing control.The rules, Booker says, will be simple:Start a fire, and you're out.Assault a teacher or another student, and you're out.Destroy school property, and you're out.Disruptive behavior will automatically be met with suspension, assignment to an alternative school or expulsion.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
All Howard County schools would adopt a very specific, uniform discipline code under a far-reaching plan to combat disruptive student behavior presented last week to the county school board.The $405,000 plan -- presented by the school system's Action Team on Disruptive Youth -- also calls for the creation of an alternative program for misbehaving elementary students, a Saturday school for disruptive middle and high school students, and an evening high school for students on long-term suspension.
NEWS
August 22, 2007
Overloaded by paperwork, testing, and the sheer numbers of kids before them, teachers lack the wherewithal to help disabled, difficult and disruptive students - especially those who come to school with problems rooted more in the world around them than in anything inside them. They must, for sheer self-preservation, move those kids out of their classrooms. Off they go into special ed, and, not infrequently, that's just the beginning of a long journey through program after program in school after school.
NEWS
August 22, 2007
Overloaded by paperwork, testing, and the sheer numbers of kids before them, teachers lack the wherewithal to help disabled, difficult and disruptive students - especially those who come to school with problems rooted more in the world around them than in anything inside them. They must, for sheer self-preservation, move those kids out of their classrooms. Off they go into special ed, and, not infrequently, that's just the beginning of a long journey through program after program in school after school.
NEWS
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,Los Angeles Times | April 21, 2007
MILWAUKEE -- After a series of violent incidents on school campuses, public school officials here are considering the use of flexible plastic handcuffs on out-of-control students - from kindergarteners on up. The Milwaukee School Board voted yesterday to begin training security staff members to use the plastic handcuffs, but the issue has provoked a heated debate between parents and administrators over how to provide a safe learning environment....
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,sun reporter | March 30, 2007
Feeling pressed for time to open a school to help educate hundreds of chronically disruptive students who are struggling to pass state standardized tests, Baltimore County school officials have approved a $43 million, 30-year lease with a Baltimore real estate firm. The Secondary Academic Intervention Model School is scheduled to open in the fall at a large business park under construction along the White Marsh Boulevard extension in eastern Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Staff | January 28, 2007
At a mandatory study hall for about 25 Towson University freshmen last semester, teaching assistant Dorothy Williams repeatedly implored several male students in the back of the classroom to stop joking around and settle down. Moments later, in response to a perceived slight, one of the troublemakers stood and struck a fellow student --- hard --- in the back. Several students laughed. A clearly rattled Williams ordered the assailant to leave the room and "cool off" by the door. "They're usually very well behaved," she insisted later, her voice still shaking.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sun reporter | January 10, 2007
A Baltimore school board meeting was disrupted last night by student protesters who interrupted the agenda to demand support as they seek $1 billion for city schools. Meanwhile, about 250 parents, children and staff members from three Baltimore schools run by Edison Schools Inc. turned out to urge officials to renew the company's expiring contract. The protesters were from the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student tutoring and advocacy group. They were unable to secure one of the 10 spots for public comment at the meeting because of the crowd from Edison.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2004
Baltimore school officials are suspending fewer disruptive students to keep schools from being labeled "persistently dangerous" under the federal No Child Left Behind law, some city teachers and principals charge. "They don't want to suspend people," said Marietta English, president of the Baltimore Teachers Union. "But they have that backward. The children need to be disciplined. That's what makes the school safe." With 15 city schools placed on probation this summer and told they're one year away from the "dangerous" label - which would give parents at those schools the right to transfer their children to other schools - some principals and teachers say they're being pressured to avoid removing disruptive youngsters from school.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff Writer | November 6, 1993
A high school student punches his teacher, then tells the teacher he will return to kill him.Another teacher decides to quit after being physically assaulted four times in less than two months -- three times by the same student.Students brutally beat a middle school teacher, sending her to the hospital in an ambulance.This fall, more than ever before, city school teachers fear for their safety, the Baltimore Teachers Union said yesterday. Students have physically assaulted about 10 of them this school year and verbally abused, cursed at and threatened many more, the union said.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1995
For the second time this week, state lawmakers in Annapolis have voted to force change in the Baltimore school system.The Senate unanimously approved a measure yesterday that would require the city to create a new education program for violent and disruptive students.The proposal, House Bill 970, now goes to Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who has not yet said whether he will sign it.Earlier this week, legislators voted to withhold $5.8 million in state aid from the city school system until they see improvement in its management.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 16, 2002
STUDENTS ROLL dice outside the school, roam the halls and pack themselves into the restrooms. "You can't teach a disorderly mob," laments one teacher. "This is the garbage can of the educational system," chimes in another. Later, a student tries to rape a teacher. A portrait of Northern High School? No, the school is a fictional one. Think back 47 years, to 1955, when the film Blackboard Jungle came out. It starred Glenn Ford, then a major star, and Sidney Poitier, who was some five years into his film career.
NEWS
March 9, 2001
ANNE ARUNDEL County Executive Janet S. Owens and the County Council won't get a chance to decide this year whether their alternative high school should be expanded. The Board of Education didn't include the proposal in its $594 million budget recommendation that's headed to the county executive for the next fiscal year. Planning and construction snafus got in the way. But now that school officials and board members have a breather to rethink the Mary E. Moss Academy expansion, they ought to think bigger.
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